Scott Foundas
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For 805 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Scott Foundas' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Junebug
Lowest review score: 0 Reasonable Doubt
Score distribution:
805 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Scott Foundas
    At nearly six hours, pic's extreme length lets Giordana and screenwriters Sandro Petraglia and Stefano Rulli build up a novelistic rhythm, pulling the audience so deeply and forcefully into their story that it becomes like a enveloping dream; when it's over, parting with the characters is truly sweet and sorrowful.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Scott Foundas
    A superior all-ages adventure pic made by a filmmaker who knows more than a thing or two about the genre.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Scott Foundas
    Enormously absorbing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Scott Foundas
    A superb, eye-opening and often absurdly funny deconstruction of the myths and realities of global terrorism that is marked by a balance, broadmindedness and sense of historical perspective so absent from many recent political-themed documentaries.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Scott Foundas
    Zoo
    A breathtakingly original nonfiction work by Seattle-based filmmaker Robinson Devor (whose "Police Beat" was among the highlights of Sundance's 2005 dramatic competition).
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Scott Foundas
    Markedly grander in scale, although never at the expense of its richly human (and half-human) characters, “Into Darkness” may not boldly go where no “Trek” adventure has gone before, but getting there is such a well-crafted, immensely pleasurable ride that it would be positively Vulcan to nitpick.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Scott Foundas
    Snowpiercer has been brought to the screen with the kind of solid narrative craftsmanship, carefully drawn characters and — above all — respect for the audience’s intelligence rarely encountered in high-concept genre cinema.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 90 Scott Foundas
    This two-ton prestige pic won’t win the hearts of highbrow critics or those averse to door-slamming, plate-smashing, top-of-the-lungs histrionics, but as a faithful filmed record of Letts’ play, one could have scarcely hoped for better.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Scott Foundas
    Cooper seems to make actors feel safe and willing to expose themselves in ways they ordinarily might not, and time and again he takes scenes to places of unexpected emotional power.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Scott Foundas
    At every turn, we can sense what’s going on behind Kumiko’s doleful, downcast eyes; Kikuchi pulls us deeply into her world.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Scott Foundas
    Now and then, Winterbottom nudges the movie in the direction of narrative... But even when it’s just ambling about, The Trip to Italy casts a warm, enveloping spell.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Scott Foundas
    It’s a familiar tale, but one told by Perry with immense filmmaking verve and novelistic flourish, and acted by an exceptional ensemble cast.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Scott Foundas
    As in all Godard’s best work, precise meaning is subsumed in an exhilarating tide of sound and light, impish provocations and inspired philosophizing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Scott Foundas
    Rock is enormously appealing here, balancing his patented comic abrasiveness with a real tenderness, the faint bewilderment of an ordinary man blindsided by his own success. And Dawson makes an excellent foil.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Scott Foundas
    What emerges, finally, is an urgent distress call from one of America’s many, predominately black inner cities cast adrift by decades of municipal neglect and institutional racism.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Grim, grueling and triumphantly powerful.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Here is a Western without irony or innovation, without any of the overt efforts toward “revisionism” we’ve come to expect even from Eastwood -- a movie that waxes elegiac about the end of the West, but remains sure that cowboys and cattle and ramshackle frontier towns will live on in perpetuity at the cinema.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    One of the best part 3's ever made, and Rodriguez's knack for concocting the most imaginatively deranged children's entertainments since "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory" remains unassailed.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The movie is enormously, convulsively funny, and it never lets up -- it has no shame.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Campbell is flat-out great, muting his beloved Sam Raimi shtick in favor of a genuine character turn, an act of transformation that makes you wonder why he's never been called on to interpret Elvis before.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Surprisingly airy, jungle-set adventure, boisterously winking at Huston, Peckinpah and the same Saturday-morning serials that birthed Indiana Jones. R.J. Stewart and James Vanderbilt's tongue-in-cheek script, a hybridization of "Midnight Run" and "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre," provides lots of amusing byplay for its two mismatched stars.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The movie looks like it cost a fortune, with Dean Cundey's glistening widescreen compositions and Bill Brzeski's towering, storybook sets providing the backdrop for seamless visual effects. What's more, it's equally rich in ideas.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    It aims simply to relate a great and enveloping story -- one that may lead us to ponder the things that unite (rather than distance) peoples of differing belief systems, and may compel us to marvel at the many wonderful and horrible endeavors undertaken in the name of religion.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Webber spins a slight but considerably enchanting tale of impossible romance and artistic discovery.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The quiet and intimacy of what is essentially a two-character piece are well juxtaposed by Brooks against the vast desert expanses of her home country, captured in sumptuous wide-screen cinematography by the great Ian Baker.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Though his work has been little seen outside of France, writer-director Jean-Claude Brisseau's reputation as one of the most terribles of his country's filmmaking enfants precedes him. This 2002 film offers ample evidence as to why.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The result is the work of a funereal yet darkly funny neorealist, sounding the rallying cry against the inflexible maxim casually delivered by one of his own film's characters.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    At the center...lies the stunning Golbahari, a nonprofessional who recalls some of Bresson's most haunting model-actors in her intense, anguished grace.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    At the movie's core, disguised with pitch-perfect Minnesota accent and bushy comb-over hairdo, the perpetually underrated Kurt Russell (as the late coach Herb Brooks) delivers a brilliant performance of immaculate control.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    In the landscape of contemporary movie comedies, Kitchen Stories is like a rejuvenating blast of crisp Nordic air.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    If we never do find out exactly why Wilbur is so intent on offing himself, it almost doesn't matter, given Sives' magnetic, star-making performance and the careful, elating mixture of comedy and pathos.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    A postmodern morality play stripped nearly bare by its precocious creator, until only its boldness, cutting insight, intermittent hilarity and bracing violence remain.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    An electrifying modern-dress noir, directed by Ernest Dickerson with a tough, terse, unapologetically brutal attitude that evokes the heyday of Sam Fuller and Robert Aldrich.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Scottish director Andrew Black keeps the pace brisk and the images sunny, while screenwriters Anne Black (his wife), Jason Faller and Katherine Swigert afford lively dialogue that, without pressing the issue, hones in on some insightful parallels between the morals of Austen's society and those of contemporary Mormon culture.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    From its very first frames it exerts a powerful fascination.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The cast is brilliant, not least of all Reilly -- vaguely despicable, smooth as an oil slick and altogether mesmerizing in the most impressive screen performance he's yet given.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    A dense and dazzling science-fiction mind-bender unassumingly dressed up in a tech geek’s short-sleeved oxford shirt, pocket protector and safety goggles.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    All three actors are more than up to the challenge, particularly the radiant Salazar, who feasts upon that rare gift of a role that allows an actress the wrong side of 40 to be funny, sexy and vital without apologizing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    It's the third feature Miller has shot using lightweight digital video cameras, and the result is a special lightness in the work itself -- the glowing images ease into one another like leaves turning in a summer breeze, while the performances are similarly effortless.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Strikes me as one of Godard's most accessible works - one in which the graying, stubbly maestro, who turns 74 today, presents himself and his ideas to the audience in a less combative way than he sometimes has in the past.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Put simply, the film is a dazzling and fearless piece of showmanship.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    If Blake Edwards wrote a script and then Abel Ferrara directed it, it might look something like Nowhere Man.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The movie catches us up so profoundly in Frankie's self-destructive spiral (and gradual rehab), it's as though we’re seeing it all for the first time. I'd like to say that's because the story is true, only it isn't.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    It's a style at once ravishing and mysterious, austere and intimate, carrying with it the suggestion that even cinema may be powerless to invade the most clandestine antechambers of human behavior.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    In its depiction of a fleeting, but nevertheless factual, peace in the Middle East, Ridley Scott's Kingdom of Heaven may seem a more quixotic Hollywood fantasy than all six Star Wars movies lumped together.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The most enjoyable film Besson has had his name on in eons.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Of course, a Batman movie is nothing without a Bruce Wayne, and, by a mile, Bale is the best of a lot that has ranged from the square-jawed slapstick of Adam West to the more dedbonair stylings of Michael Keaton, Val Kilmer and George Clooney.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The acting is uniformly superb.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The imagery is startling not just for its symbolic resonances, but for the breathless intensity with which it sears the screen.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    There may be no other actor (Thornton)working today (or as frequently) who is this good each and every time out.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The result is a film chilly and externalized in all the ways that Mood was bottled up and woozily dreamlike.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Whether you take it as horror show or social commentary (or both), this is sublimely terrifying stuff.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The emotional truthfulness of Clean enters into our bloodstreams with its muted vigor, and we find ourselves getting hooked by this tale of getting unhooked.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This ridiculously entertaining sequel is that rare part deux that leaves you hankering for part trois. The action is, in a word, spectacular, but also playful, inventive and witty.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This is still powerful, undiluted stuff -- a jolt of backwoods moonshine whiskey injected into the veins of the atrophied American relationship drama.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This meticulously well-made picture is disarmingly funny at times - not least during the ballet of bloody absurdity that is the assassination itself - but also subdued and straight-faced, with one eye planted on 1979 and the other on the violent student demonstrations looming in the distance.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The Weather Man begs to be taken seriously and can't easily be dismissed; it kicks around in your mind for a good long while after you've seen it. Cage, who does his finest work since "Leaving Las Vegas," has stripped himself bare of the patented tics and mannerisms he honed in one Jerry Bruckheimer movie too many.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Its jazzy rhythm and economy of form place it closer to a 1950s film noir, shot through with humor so dark you need a flashlight to see it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Queen Latifah gives a spectacular performance in this hugely enjoyable wish-fulfillment fantasy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This is some of the best filmmaking ever done by director Richard Donner, a longtime Hollywood journeyman known more for his proficient deployment of three long-running movie franchises (The Omen, Superman and Lethal Weapon) than for his lyricism.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Shot quickly and cheaply in high-definition video and almost entirely on one set, the movie has almost zero visual energy, but it teems with snappy dialogue and the same carnival anarchy Lumet brought to "Dog Day Afternoon" and "Network."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The heist at the heart of Inside Man is brilliant, and so is the movie.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    It's the kind of movie that used to be called "trashy good fun," only there's nothing trashy about it: Gunn, who scripted the 2004 "Dawn of the Dead" remake, is clearly punch-drunk with horror-movie love; Slither is, among other things, a freewheeling homage to "The Blob, Invasion of the Body Snatchers" and just about everything by George Romero.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    At once playful and thorough, the documentary is also stacked teased-hair high with wicked performance footage.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This remarkable film from Australia, the debut feature of writer-director Cate Shortland, moves to the lyrical rhythms and unhurried pace of a 1970s road movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Becomes one of those wonderfully weird adventure stories beloved of children who don't mind getting a good old-fashioned case of the heebie-jeebies. It's kind of a blast for adults too.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Not just the funniest but the smartest comedy around by a mile.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This is also an acidly funny work, even if the humor is that of a man who drinks to stave off the pain and madness of sobriety. In his finest performance since "Drugstore Cowboy," Dillon plays Chinanski with funereal grandiosity.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    As before, Bujalski's preference for nonprofessional actors, his ear for the rhythms of conversation among bright young 20-somethings and his adept use of a roving, hand-held camera (this time shooting in fuzzy black and white) lend the film an invigorating energy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    As merry pranksters they have no match, and as they age (Knoxville is 35 now), they only grow in appeal. As they proudly hurl their tattooed (by ink and battle scars) bodies into harm's way, a devilish glint in their eyes, it's as if they've discovered the fountain of youth, and its name is Jackass.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    For the soul of Gondry's work, it seems to me, is neither its soaring flights of visual fancy nor its sometimes crude slapstick, but rather its pained understanding of a generation hopelessly tongue-tied when it comes to matters of the heart.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    It's forceful and alive and spilling over with crazy poetry.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The boldest provocation of Mitchell’s sweet, tender and gently funny film may be its exuberant celebration of community and togetherness at a cultural moment rife with fatalism and disconnect.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Infamous is the better Capote film, yes, but also the less easily digestible one, the more eccentric one and -- yes -- the gayer one.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The actors are superb -- especially Smith, who exudes some of the live-wire charisma of the young Sean Penn in Rosenthal's "Bad Boys," and the smoldering Brewster.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The gimmick is simple but devastatingly effective: Never once breaking character or acknowledging that he’s in on the joke, the Jew-fearing, grammatically challenged reporter ingratiates himself with his unsuspecting, average-American victims before uproariously turning the tables on them.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    That may not exactly thrill those who admire the Saw films only for their splatter quotient, but all told, this is a more affecting study in grief, guilt and human frailty than "Babel."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    It's something of a family affair -- only this time, instead of casting his relatives in the leading roles, Ceylan has cast himself and his real-life wife, Ebru, as Isa and Bahar. And if, in the hands of a lesser filmmaker, such a decision might foster a mood of lurid home-movie voyeurism, both Ceylans are such commanding and subtly expressive performers that any charges of nepotism here are as erroneous as in the storied collaborations of John Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Much of the film is as strange and oddly beautiful as one of Arbus' own photographs, bold in its attempt to find new ways of cracking the biopic chestnut and sensitive in its portrayal of a 1950s woman who, like so many of her contemporaries, finds herself imprisoned in a "Good Housekeeping" nightmare.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Whereas "Nine Queens" was a movie of clockwork precision and blindsiding reversals, El Aura is more internalized and digressive but no less striking, in large part thanks to Darin's mesmerizing performance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    What gives Rocky Balboa its unexpected pathos is the titanic humility of Stallone's performance, the earnestness with which he plays a man knocked down (but not out) by the ravages of time.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    At its best, Behind the Mask offers some, um, cutting insights about mass-media blood lust and the cult of the serial killer, and in Baesel, who is by turns charming, manic and thoroughly scary, it has a gifted young actor who clearly relishes a role he can sink his pitchfork into.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    It all sounds like a recipe for the most noxious liberal jerk-off movie since "Crash," but in the hands of writer-director Richard LaGravenese, Freedom Writers turns out to be a superb piece of mainstream entertainment -- not an agonized debate over the principles of modern education à la "The History Boys," but a simple, straightforward and surprisingly affecting story of one woman who managed to make a difference.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    In his best film to date, Nick Cassavetes directs with ferocious energy, taking scenes past their logical stopping points and pushing his actors (particularly Foster, who can be as terrifying as Edward Norton in "American History X") to, but never over, the precipice of absurdity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Here is one of the best American actors (Chris Cooper) in one of his best parts.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This is gloriously self-aware hokum, a fantasy movie that is, above all, about our need for fantasy and escapism -- and even our need for movies like The Astronaut Farmer -- to help us combat the depression and disappointments of the everyday.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Though Akel and Mass share writing credit, Chalk was actually shot in a loose, improvisational manner in the mode of Christopher Guest's films, and its best set pieces are like devastatingly effective pinpricks puncturing the Hollywood hot-air balloon of inspirational teacher/coach melodramas.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The film arrives at a familiar conclusion -- that war is hell -- but the getting there is made uniquely unsettling by Dumont's relentlessly anti-psychological disposition.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Provided you don't think too long or hard about it (and why ever would you?), Live Free or Die Hard is infectious good fun, and a tremendous encouragement to the middle aged.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    It casts an increasingly hypnotic spell, thanks in no small measure to Wright -- a fearless actress (and the real-life wife of writer-director Ruscio) who brings this sometimes despicable, often heartbreaking character to life with every atom of her being.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Crossing the Line, like its subject, remains a fascinating and frustrating enigma -- a declassified government report still marred by redacted passages.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Jolting narrative ellipses sometimes threatens to bring the whole house of cards tumbling down. What never lessens is the movie's rapturous eroticism, and the exquisite longing in each one of Yu Hong's sideways glances.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Margot at the Wedding gives its characters (and us) something to laugh about.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The film’s appeal is at once sentimental and perverse: It’s not every day that you get to see a 92-year-old woman soloing on “Should I Stay Or Should I Go.” Not surprisingly, a feature remake is already in the works.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This won't be remembered as one of the prodigiously talented Armstrong's great films (My Brilliant Career, High Tide, Little Women), but it's still 90 percent better than everything else out there.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Anderson and his very fine cast keep things chugging along at a breathless pace, complete with a midfilm reversal of fortune nearly as unexpected as "Psycho's" shower scene. All aboard!
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Witty, insightful portraits of hyperverbal, self-conscious young people falling in and out of love.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    By the standards of today's bombastic "event" movies, this is a refreshingly modest endeavor—one in which the main event is the skillful holding of our attention, all the way from "Once upon a time" to "Happily ever after."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Playful and tense, loaded with wry cine-references and propelled by an ebullient energy...It seems more obvious than ever how much Rivette has influenced a subsequent generation of filmmakers—Spike Jonze, Charlie Kaufman, Michel Gondry—and expanded our sense of the possible.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Kiarostami shoots Africa with an uncanny verisimilitude, coming close here to his idea of a "poetic cinema" indebted more to poetry and music than the theatrical novelistic storytelling tradition.

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