Scott Foundas

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For 869 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Scott Foundas' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Before Sunset
Lowest review score: 0 Grind
Score distribution:
869 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Dog Days is in fact a bleak but deeply felt humanism -- a yearning that we might all learn to better love our neighbors and, perhaps more importantly, ourselves.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Beguiling and intoxicating.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    There's greater consistency to it, and considerably more humor, with macabre slapstick and fun-house ghoulishness that, at their best, recall early Tim Burton.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Stickler goes straight to the source, combining terrific archival footage with interviews of Tony Hawk, Stacy Peralta and others who knew Rogowski back in the day.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Surprisingly enjoyable, even if you'd hesitate to call it a complete success. Indeed, Figgis expects you to sit back and roll with the pleasurable moments.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The bigger-than-big, rambunctious spectacle is way too much of a questionably good thing.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The movie surely owes something to Polanski, Cronenberg, et al., in its use of an apparently placid, upper-middle-class setting as the background for perverse horrors, but De Van's fearless, high-wire performance is uniquely its own.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The romance that ensues between Macy and Bello (both of whom are terrific) is exactly the kind of mature, sexy adult relationship that people complain doesn’t exist in movies anymore.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Bell forces us to see characters from the proverbial wrong side of the tracks in a distinctly human light, neither ennobling nor pitying.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    On the plus side, The Company is directed by Robert Altman, who's clearly drawn in by the rare opportunity of putting ballet on film, and who responds brilliantly...The rest of the time, the film fails to catch us up in the workaday intrigues of its characters (most of whom are played by real Joffrey dancers) the way Altman can when he's working in top form.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    This is a heartfelt endeavor, given weight by Shimono's extraordinary performance, in which the actor uses the subtlest flicks of his weary brow to call forth torrents of sorrow and minefields of regret.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Hidalgo can still be a wonder to behold, especially in its dynamic racing sequences, but the movie bogs down in its midsection with a needless kidnapping subplot that ultimately becomes quite tedious.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Morlang has surprises up its sleeve that even the seasoned genre fan may not see coming.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Rigged toward a sentimental conclusion and overpopulated with cutesy touches (including a curtain-call finale), but there are many remarkable sights along the way.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    If the movie is finally something of a failure as a romance, it's rarely less than a triumph of soulful imagination.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Far from a complete success: It takes too long to get to its central premise and, once there, too often meanders away from it. But Campbell is close to astonishing whenever she's onscreen.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    A remarkably clear-eyed look back at a moment in which real revolution seemed possible - even probable - in America's streets.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Turturro keeps Fear X fascinating, practically in spite of itself.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The movie isn't particularly tasteful or finely crafted -- but it grabs you by the jugular, and only during an overcooked climax does it finally relax its grip.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Peet is triumphant as the beguiling object of desire with wounded-bird eyes and devilish smile -- sexy and tart, then, in the space of a breath, totally, tenderly tragic. Like Oliver, we'd happily follow her anywhere.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The strengths of Dominion, however, have been little diminished by its long shelf life and, in fact, may have grown stronger with age.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Though Lifshitz's attitude toward sex and sexuality ranks among the most progressive in contemporary movies, he doesn't belabor it; seen through his eyes, Wild Side is a love story in which love is unrestrained by matters of gender or sexual orientation or even the number of lovers.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Love him or loathe him, Avrich proposes, Wasserman mattered -- which is a lot more than can be said for most of the multinationals and their MBA-bearing surrogates who came to run the studios in his wake.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    It's a finely tuned Motor City engine: The action, including a nighttime car chase through a blinding snowstorm, is fast, brutal and efficient; the Motown soundtrack never cuts out; and as a gangster called Sweet, the British-Nigerian actor Chiwetel Ejiofor gives an electrifying performance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    There's something magical about seeing a packed house of 300 Taveuni locals laugh equally uproariously, and, without a nanosecond’s worth of culture shock, at Queen Latifah in "Bringing Down the House" and Buster Keaton in "Steamboat Bill, Jr."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Playing something of a cipher who reinvents himself as the occasion demands, Wood is unusually well cast, but it's Hunnam, with a psychotic twinkle in his eye, who turns the movie on whenever he's onscreen.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    American independent movies about awkward adolescence are never in short supply, but this highly assured first feature by commercials and music video director Mike Mills is the first since "Donnie Darko" to view the latter stages of teenagerdom as fodder for a phantasmagorical odyssey of Lewis Carroll–like distortions.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    G
    A handsome, compelling drama, about the African-American elite settling in the Hamptons, that more than stands on its own.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    As in many of his films, Jaglom establishes a striking intimate rapport with his female subjects, and as the funny and bitter revelations pour forth, an activity that many men may view as something done strictly out of necessity takes on unforeseen narcotic, romantic and therapeutic dimensions.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The flawed, fascinating Land of Plenty is easily Wenders' most vital work in more than a decade -- a troubling meditation on terrorism paranoia, poverty and homelessness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    This is as corny as it sounds, and yet not half as cloying and sentimental as you expect. At the end of the day, the horse may win the race, but the fate of the American heartland looms large and unresolved.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The Roost advances a nifty man-vs.-nature scenario that harks back to Fessenden's own "Wendigo" and provides a nice chaser to a summer movie season populated by cuddly penguins and benevolent cheetahs.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    If you cut through Lucas' thickets of self-reflexivity, metaphysical mumbo jumbo and banal potshots at media violence, there are three ace performances here by actors who can elevate and enliven even as mediocre a piece of material as this.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The infectious high spirits of the performers help to carry the day.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    It's not a great movie, or even a particularly good one, but it's spectacular. No expense has been spared. The technical crew reads like a roll call of Oscar-night regulars.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    A warm, spacious road movie with a stirring sense of the wide-open landscapes of the American West.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    This is exceedingly earnest stuff, dolloped with Christian goodness and solid production values.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    It's true, of course, that Trier still hasn't set foot on U.S. soil, but it may be that he sees us, in all our virtue and victimhood, that much more clearly for it.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Like the best pulp, though, it gets its hooks into you faster than you can start to wonder why you should possibly care about what happens to any of its despicable characters, and, before you know it, you’ve been pulled deep into its Dantean vision.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    What seduces most about Ask the Dust isn't its verisimilitude, but its gloriously old-fashioned backlot sheen - the L.A. of old Hollywood movies and of our collective fantasies.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Johnson pulls us into his world and keeps things oddly plausible, despite the intense stylization
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    If "Crash" grew a pair of cojones, it might look something like Larry Clark’s cheerfully defiant Wassup Rockers.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Cruise is probably the most graceful physical performer to occupy the screen since Burt Lancaster, and in this sort of action role, he's just about peerless...He may not be a great actor, but to find a greater movie star would be a nigh impossible mission.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Art School Confidential reaches its dementedly brilliant peak in the company of Jim Broadbent.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The pleasure of La Moustache is that it doesn't feel the need to explain itself at every turn. Part absurdist comedy about the institution of marriage, part paranoid Kafkaesque fantasy, it's a minor-key reverie on the way our own lives can sometimes feel alien to us.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Manna from gearhead heaven, the third and most guiltily pleasurable Furious emits the crude thrills of a 1950s drag-racing cheapie, only with souped-up Toyotas and Nissans in place of gas-guzzling hot rods, and slinky Asian temptresses substituted for poodle-skirted teenyboppers.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    This is the umpteenth movie I’ve seen this year about guys in their 30s who aren't quite sure what they want to do with their lives, and it's the only one that strikes a real chord, because it's neither an exaltation nor a condemnation of slackerdom, but rather just a sweet little fable about how sometimes the life that you think could be so much better is actually pretty damn good already.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    A one-joke movie if ever there was, but the joke happens to be a good one -- a Tracy-and-Hepburn-style battle of the sexes in which Kate can fly and blast through walls -- and director Ivan Reitman (who made Ghostbusters) feels at home with the mix of screwball and supernatural.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The result is (no pun intended) a powerful wake-up call, not just for Hollywood but for a nation that once fought passionately for the eight-hour workday and now, ever more willingly, works itself to death.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Worms is one of those rare kiddie flicks that successfully adopt a child’s-eye view of the world, where nothing is more important than saving face on the playground and where parents are as distant and clueless as storybook giants.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Core has a touch with actors, too, and there are surprisingly fine performances here.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The film's power is undeniable, as a bittersweet valentine to Buzz and the many others who came to Hollywood and found a factory that produced dreams, yes, but nightmares too.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    A highly enjoyable programmer about those brave young men and their rickety flying machines.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    These hunks of greased lightning tell how a gearhead SoCal teen got wind of the post-World War II hot-rodding craze, crossed paths with a pinstriper named von Dutch and ended up as the automotive visionary whom Tom Wolfe famously called “a genius of the only uniquely American art form.”
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Repeatedly, Iñárritu and Arriaga stop themselves just short of suggesting that we're all going to hell in a hand basket. Had they not -- well, then Babel might really have been onto something.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The movie is enjoyable, but not passionately engaging in the way we've come to expect from Almodóvar, and it leaves you somewhat cold in spite of the warmth of Cruz's galvanic performance.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    "The Blues Brothers" it is not, but in its best moments, the movie feels like a comic exaggeration of the real hardships that a couple of average, decidedly unhip guys went through on their unlikely way to the top.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    For a movie conceived and executed in the mainstream Hollywood idiom, it has uncommon depth and honesty.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Always good with actors, Hanson brings out a beaten-down charm in Bana that works nicely against the hotheaded authority the actor shows in the gambling scenes, while Duvall is, like the veteran card shark he plays, a master of subtle gestures. The low card here is Barrymore, somewhat awkwardly shoehorned into this boys' club to provide some romantic relief.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The canniness of Bale’s performance (which may be the best of his young but brilliant career) is that he plays Dengler as a fundamentally kind and simple yet rather ingenious man.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Far from an embarrassment and a generally fine piece of work.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Like most of the men in the film, we would happily follow her anywhere.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    It is the point -- and the power -- of Deep Water that the vast, unknowable fathoms of the sea are rivaled only by those of the human psyche.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Under Mangold’s sure if uninspired hand, the new Yuma is reasonably exciting and terse, and, like its predecessor, built around a memorable villain of ambiguous villainy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    He Was a Quiet Man casts its own perversely funny spell thanks in large part to Slater, whose wonderfully shifty, beaten-down performance is easily his best in the 17 years.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    In a boom time for movies about the scars of the battlefield, Half Moon reminds that the unending strife and religious fundamentalism of the Middle East kills not just people but culture too.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    I’d be lying if I said that The Band’s Visit isn’t touching and uplifting and all those other audience-friendly emotions against which film critics are believed to religiously steel themselves. But in a season rife with movies (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, Grace Is Gone, The Kite Runner, et al.) that aggressively pry open viewers’ chest cavities and yank on their heartstrings, Kolirin’s film is the only one that plucks at them gently, tickling the funny bone as it goes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    To call Shine a Light a documentary doesn’t quite nail it; it’s more of a macro-mentary, shot in such tight close-up that you can see the fillings in Mick’s teeth and the sweat stains in the armpits of his sequined magenta top.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Just around the halfway point, something unexpected happens -- the movie actually gets good. You can chalk that up to the delightful Alan Rickman.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The movie is basically on one level and Faris on another -- in that exclusive aerie occupied by Judy Holliday, Carole Lombard, Lucille Ball and a few other blissfully original comedy goddesses.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    When most filmmakers want to say something important about cultural conflicts, they labor to bring tears to our eyes. Dabis, by contrast, makes us laugh at ourselves and, in turn, each other.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Moments of genuine insight alternate freely with those of banal psychologizing, but even then there can be no denying that the filmmaker has an ear for a certain brand of self-absorbed discourse often overheard in restaurants and bars in the shadow of the Hollywood sign. And given the choice, I’ll take Henry’s home movies over Jonathan Demme’s any day of the week.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The Berlin File keeps narrative coherence far down on a priority list that privileges expertly choreographed hand-to-hand combat, hair-raising stunt work...and such familiar genre accoutrements as secret rooms hidden behind bookshelves, shiny metallic attaché cases, and pens concealing fast-acting vials of poison.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Jaglom's quickest and funniest picture in years and the most accessible.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The happiest marriage yet of the disparate propagandistic and narrative influences inherent in the subgenre of "religious" cinema.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The most affable and endearing of the recent wave of films about Indian immigrants assimilating in the West.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Fine new chapter in the long-running franchise should score well with family audiences.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    As a spy pic, it has more pizzazz than the last few Bond adventures, "The Sum of All Fears" or "The Recruit."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Jokes about impotence, menopause and other middle-aged maladies reside where a screenplay ought to live.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Inoffensive adolescent escapism laced with surprising amounts of genuine charm.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Moves along at a clip and provides a terrific action lead for Dwayne "the Rock" Johnson.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Not as insightful as "Topsy-Turvy" or "Vanya on 42nd Street" about the process of putting on a show, it's nonetheless a fascinating meeting of the minds -- between iconic New York indie filmmaker Michael Almereyda and laconic American cowboy and dramatist Shepard.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Sublimely trashy, this conceptual sequel to 1997's surprise hit, "Anaconda," doesn't expect to be taken any more seriously than its schlock predecessor, and keeps its tongue-in-cheek thrills flowing rapidly.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Largely plays down the ethnic stereotyping to deliver a carefully observed, fundamentally human roundelay about the wonders and horrors of looking for someone to love.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Ultimately something of a softball satire, its climactic evocation of the "true meaning" of the holidays is surprisingly touching.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Snicket's macabre tale of three newly orphaned siblings has been lavishly visualized. But for all its elaborate splendor, production pic lacks the feeling and imagination that have distinguished the best recent kidpics.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    The genocide of some one million Rwandan Tutsis by their Hutu neighbors remains a disgraceful and too-little-known episode in recent world history. Alas, Terry George's ineffectual Hotel Rwanda only partly rectifies that problem, taking what ought to have been a complex, powerful inquiry and simplifying it to a story about the resilience of the human spirit.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    May not be a complete success, but it is in some ways that rarest of commodities in American movies: It is a movie about sex and sexuality, in its many perversions and permutations, done without falling back on an exploitatively comic or violent scenario.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Looks with fresh eyes at a new millennium in which, seemingly, the entire world is bought and sold in neatly wrapped packages engineered for mass consumption.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Like a really, really high-tech version of a high school class trip to the planetarium.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    A noteworthy piece on a difficult subject.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    An immensely likable, funny comedy that finds a novel approach to that familiar combo of kids and sports.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Brings a fresh perspective to age-old human dilemmas.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Has a relaxed poeticism to it; it's a sweetly naive, adolescent Hemingway fantasy with a star-making performance by Shawn Hatosy and good ones from everyone else (including Caan).
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Pic makes up in strong performances and wry observation what it sometimes lacks in narrative drive. Result is a perceptive (and unexpectedly moving) portrait of lives in crisis.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Examines 50-odd years in the life of its eponymous subject -- a most compelling character -- and in doing so literally provides the viewer with food for thought.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Result is imperfect and overlong, but hugely ambitious and often breathtaking.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    A perceptive, unsettling psychodrama marking the assured feature writing and directing debut of shorts filmmaker Kyle Henry.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Billed as a silent film, Guy Maddin's Brand Upon the Brain! is actually closer to a live theatrical event -- a feature-length motion picture screened with the accompaniment of a live orchestra, plus Foley artists, sound effects technicians and assorted vocalists, too. Together, they provide the elaborate soundscape for a typically frenetic, Maddin-esque amalgam of the autobiographical, Freudian and willfully absurd.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Scott Foundas
    Blessed with a witty script (by Zobel and co-writer George Smith), a talented ensemble of little-known character actors and a Meredith Willson-like feel for just-plain-folks Americans, this is a low-key but enormously charming picture.

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