For 1,660 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Scott Tobias' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Funny Games (2008)
Lowest review score: 0 From Justin to Kelly
Score distribution:
1660 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    Solomon handles their crises of conscience with a studied compassion that hangs over scenes like a lead weight, though the actors (particularly Dunst) do their best to bring more range to his gray palette.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    Elf
    The cast wrings laughs out of David Berenbaum's script as if it were a damp washcloth.
    • The A.V. Club
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    It’s undeniably moving, but straightforward to a fault.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    The film falls apart once its mysteries dissipate. With them go all the dark ambiguities that colored the first hour.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    A documentary that focuses rigorously on process and atmosphere at the expense of context and engagement.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    Next Goal Wins could stand to go deeper into game strategy, or local customs and living conditions, or any number of personal stories, but the victories it does achieve are enormously satisfying.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    As it settles in, the thrilling chutzpah of The Blue Room’s opening salvo gets lost in the intricate curlicues of the plot, which take away much of its illicit rush.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    While it’s a shame Leong couldn’t find a fresher approach to Lin’s story—and that he left out any postscript about his struggles the following season in Houston—he does well in setting the stakes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    For all their brutality, the fights are so seductive and exciting that their consequences - the physical and mental toll exacted from the men and their families - sometimes fail to register.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    Searching for originality in an addiction narrative like Animals is a problem, because these stories of decline and degradation tend to sound the same. So the limited time frame is the film’s strongest asset, because it’s only paying attention to the final hours.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    As her character resorts to increasingly cruel and devious pranks, Hudson only seems funnier and more endearing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    Given an irresistible premise, Nathanson doesn't trust his material enough to follow through without excessive mugging, but his sense of the absurd leads to amusing digressions along the way.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    The connection between Hu and Liu seems more scripted than real, founded on musty allegorical clichés about innocent country folk and corrupt city slickers.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    Carries a potent statement about the superficialities of appearance, and how they're more meaningful to people than anyone likes to acknowledge. But when the players themselves are conceived this superficially, LaBute winds up invalidating his own point.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    Moves forward on the conviction of its performances. Brody, in particular, shows uncommon sensitivity as a politically committed and temperamental photographer who responds to MacDowell's half-crazed resolution with heartbreaking zeal.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    With its genuine interest in the immigrant experience and what it means to be an American, McFarland USA ekes out a victory in the margins, proving that a little openness and a little self-awareness can do wonders.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    The film is righteous but propagandistic, gearing its considerable insight into the Deepwater disaster and its aftermath into a narrow, prodding call to arms. For a documentary wide-ranging to the point of being diffuse, the last-ditch rallying cry seems entirely out of place. It undermines its own complexity.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    The film's outsized ambitions are deceptive: Everything here is less than meets the eye.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    The small grace of The Good Lie, from Monsieur Lazhar director Philippe Falardeau, is that it fully recognizes the problem of telling stories of black hardship through the prism of white charity, and does everything it can to avoid those pitfalls.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    Only in the final minutes, when Kári overreaches for ironic effect, does the film plumb too far into the darkness.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    With their fawning documentary Year Of The Yao, directors James D. Stern and Adam Del Deo unreflectively buy into the spin on charismatic 7'6" basketball center Yao Ming, but on a certain level, who can blame them?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    As in Hoop Dreams, troubles at home raise the stakes hugely on the court, though the dream here is far more modest: to slake their thirst for just one victory, and to know, for once, what winning feels like. Their pursuit of this elusive goal gives Medora a strong narrative through-line, but Cohn and Rothbart cling to it too fervently.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    There's ample opportunity here for a sharp consumerist satire, like a dryer cousin to the candy-colored pop-culture send-up “Josie And The Pussycats,” but Hartley misses his own joke.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    The film's moralistic streak leaves a sour taste, especially because its battle of the sexes is so wildly off-balance.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    Sags into a dreary, humorless family melodrama.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    Leaves all the real risks to the young warriors at Ia Drang and collects easy dividends on their bravery. In the end, it honors them by paying tribute to itself.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    As Collyer risks caricature—if a caricature of Florida is even possible at this point—Watts and Dillon ease Sunlight Jr. back to more grounded, fundamental truths.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    Save for two spectacularly impressionistic sequences, Taymor brings little of that imagination to Frida, a turgid and conventional biopic that skips through the major incidents in Kahlo's life without giving them any special resonance, or even much visual panache.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    For a comedian who thrives on spontaneity, the heart of Reno's act seems conspicuously canned.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Scott Tobias
    Mommy puts all its personal baggage on the table like Ally Sheedy emptying her purse in The Breakfast Club, and Dolan is to be admired for sharing so much of himself, and doing it with such evident passion. But it isn’t enough for an artist simply to share—he has to shape, too.

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