Sonia Saraiya

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For 199 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sonia Saraiya's Scores

Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Handmaid's Tale: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 I Wanna Marry Harry: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 14 out of 199
199 tv reviews
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Sonia Saraiya
    The FX comedy’s fifth season reveals a show that is as confident and distinctive as ever, a sitcom that is not quite like anything else on television.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Sonia Saraiya
    Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale is a worthy, heartbreaking adaptation of the text, anchored by strong performances and profound visual grammar.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Sonia Saraiya
    An exquisitely rendered documentary of the natural world. ... As a show, it is masterful work. As an instrument of love and affection for the multitudes of life on this fragile world, it is indispensible.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Sonia Saraiya
    With Masters and Johnson occupying a space in between love, work, and friendship, the heart of the Masters feels like it is finally beating; the joy of the show is watching the two of them interact with each other, and Lizzy Caplan and Michael Sheen have thrown themselves wholeheartedly into their roles. Ashford and her team have also become more confident with pacing and plotting.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Sonia Saraiya
    Outlander succeeds admirably, and partly that’s because it follows the bent of both of its creators: It refuses to sit comfortably in any genre.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Sonia Saraiya
    This isn’t just a story, it’s a history, and admirably, the work of the players has brought it to life.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Sonia Saraiya
    If there is just one thing that The People v. O.J. Simpson is, it’s maddening. Fascinating and involved and nuanced and sympathetic, too.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Sonia Saraiya
    Fortunately, it continues to be fascinating.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Sonia Saraiya
    The series is ambitious and shaggy--those two go hand-in-hand--but despite its blurry spots, The Honorable Woman is hard not to watch all the way through. The story sucks viewers in farther and farther down a rabbit hole that does not end.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Sonia Saraiya
    Penny Dreadful is a surprising show, one that offers both some putrid rotting at the core of London’s soul and a way of going about excavating humanity’s inherent darkness in a different and unexpected way. That is easily worth a penny, and maybe more.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Sonia Saraiya
    As of right now, Satisfaction is actually suspenseful--leaving the audience unsure if its protagonists will embrace their better natures or succumb to their special version of suburban ennui. And though some of that suspense is a result of some messy decision-making, those types of messes look a lot like life.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 91 Sonia Saraiya
    Game Of Thrones has not moved away from “sexposition,” prostitution, and casual rape as titillating plot points, and that will always tarnish what is otherwise a groundbreaking show. But the good outweighs the bad. Game Of Thrones was and is an astonishing achievement.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Sonia Saraiya
    Burton And Taylor is not comprehensive or perfect as a film--the direction in particular is lackluster--but as a character study in both writing and acting it is, as Burton says of Taylor herself, “peerless.”
    • 67 Metascore
    • 91 Sonia Saraiya
    The result is a show that isn’t always “ha ha” funny, but is scathingly brilliant.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    In the fifth season, the story has been distilled to just the moments of pathos and characterization and gorgeous direction that make the story work.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    This season has done a much better job at focusing on the characters and stories that really pop, and sidelining or writing out the relationships that were boring.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    It carries a stronger sense of artful engagement with the viewer, through both direction and tone.... It’s still not exactly an easy watch, but it’s a far more engrossing one than in season one.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s quietly brilliant, as we have come to expect from Simon.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    A finished, cinematic, and beautiful production that may be one of the best new shows of the fall.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s not easily definable as a format, being the love child of a passion for O’Neill, stand-up comedy, and the most available format C.K. has--a webseries. That makes for a strange and sublime episode, one that is gripping in both how different it is and how familiar it feels.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    What’s best of all about A Series of Unfortunate Events is how every element of it--from the performances and set pieces to the detailed production design and steady pacing--come together to form a complete, considered vision.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    The drama is not perfect, but the ambition behind it is breathtaking.... As if the scope of the show weren’t enough, American Crime ups the ante with surprisingly affecting directorial choices.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    Witty, airy, convoluted Lady Dynamite is no exception, showcasing a brilliance of concept and bizarre execution that would be hard sells on many other networks.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    A show that cannot help but carry with it the burden of being a standard-bearer for diverse voices on television, even as it attempts to be, you know, funny. Insecure proves to be ably up to the challenge. The show marries specific issues with universal questions to create situations that are both precise and affecting. ... Issa herself is a profane, brilliant lead character.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    BoJack Horseman is deeply, ridiculously funny.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    What makes Transparent season two different from last season--which was itself technically and thematically brilliant--is that creator, writer, and director Jill Soloway introduces a thread of historicity to the story, with flashbacks, of a sort, to 1933 Berlin.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    This fourth season is not pretending that things are funnier or more upbeat than they really are. Either by accident or design, Kohan and her team have found a way to pull the rug out from under its audience, with a sudden reminder of the horrors of mass incarceration.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    The new show, which updates the original’s single-mom plotline to follow a Cuban-American family in Los Angeles, is fresh, funny, and smart. ... The pilot episode alone is an exercise in using sitcom rhythms to further, not just flatten, the themes of the show.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    The Night Of is compulsively watchable and extraordinarily rewarding, a brilliant and addictive mystery that inspires the viewer to go back and watch the same scenes again, looking for subtler character beats and hidden clues.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    Samantha Bee’s Full Frontal debuted last night with an acerbic, bracing premiere that felt like, in the best way possible, a much-needed slap in the face.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 83 Sonia Saraiya
    Black Box doesn’t have that show’s [HBO's Enlightened] subtlety, but it’s certainly demonstrated an interest in creating a portrait of a contradictory and flawed, but powerful and engaging female character.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 83 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s not doing a whole lot of work to examine the role of women in society, but it is a show with a single and still-novel goal: to entertain women, without patronizing them.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Sonia Saraiya
    Now, three seasons in, Dunham and her team are better at doing what they’ve been trying to do all along: create a string of lovely character vignettes, with a deliberate disinterest in plot and a fascination with a certain zeitgeist. This is specific enough that it has its disadvantages, but now that the characters have been around for two seasons, it’s become easier to understand their different versions of cluelessness.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Sonia Saraiya
    Where Bletchley succeeds is in its unapologetic, decidedly feminine take on British life in the ’50s.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Sonia Saraiya
    Fargo is a singular idea with, so far, not-so-singular execution, perhaps suffering from the fact that what was revelatory in 1996 might be just humdrum in 2014.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Sonia Saraiya
    Madam Secretary is not perfect, but it could be. There are seeds of something excellent in this pilot, one that’s able to tell a character-driven story in a world that’s constantly changing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Sonia Saraiya
    Ultimately it’s that frisson of complication that makes Manhattan worth watching--the performances are good, the writing is good, and the premise is good, but the complication of our own history is involving and fantastic.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 83 Sonia Saraiya
    There’s something lighthearted about the proceedings, murder and mayhem aside, because the show is more interested in the character drama than the procedure. Taxi Brooklyn embraces the New York-ness of both its main characters, and that bodes well for its future--and provides something fascinating to watch through the summer, in the meantime.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s not perfect, but it’s never boring.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Sonia Saraiya
    Despite what feels like risky storytelling, Homeland is staying true to its characters, following through on its fireworks to examine the ashes as well. It’s hard to tell which way it’s going to go, but for its performances and sheer courage, it’s worth watching.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 83 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s not exactly groundbreaking, but it’s fun to watch and slightly addictive.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Brockmire is a weird, funny portrait of a singular man, and it paints its picture very well--working both as a snapshot of this aging oddity of Americana and a universal story about a washed-up person coming to terms with himself, despite several drunken efforts to the contrary.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Corden and bandleader Reggie Watts make a fantastic team, but they bear eerie resemblance to Fallon and his bandleader Questlove.... The total randomness of the stars made for some of the show’s alchemical appeal.... So, so often, these pre-recorded videos or rehearsed segments look and feel excruciatingly awkward or boring. It bodes very well for Corden, and for CBS, that he made these excursions into the absurd look like a lot of fun, both to be in and to watch.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s essentially fun and easy to watch, and isn’t attempting to comment grandly on humanity.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Season 2 makes room for Jimmy’s relationship with Kim, and to my mind, it gives the show a jolt of emotional resonance.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The show’s strength is that it makes the experience of inevitable catastrophe so watchable, like being enraptured by a car-crash in slow motion. You live with creeping dread, and so do the characters.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Rather than break down each episode into sketches, each episode is its own, contained sketch, focusing on one particular set of characters and their stories. It makes Portlandia a lot easier to watch--and a bit more profound, too.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Adam Reed--creator, showrunner, voice actor, and writer--seems to have composed Archer both as a love letter to douchebags and as a set of instructions for destroying them. Having a baby might be the final nail in the coffin. Then again, maybe not; Sterling’s the resilient type.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Metatextual commentary aside, the third and final season of Kroll Show starts off strong.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Master of None is about grappling with a specific kind of privilege, and figuring out how to live with it; in that sense, it is the definitive millennial comedy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s frequently possible to see the jokes in Trial & Error coming from a mile away, but the commitment of the performers somehow makes even the silliest punchlines very funny.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    This is a sumptuously produced, beautifully executed show, and if the story doesn’t always make sense, the metaphysics always does.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Making a Murderer doesn’t have that arresting peg of the audience surrogate, which can so often be a galvanizing force in and out of a dense journalistic tale. But it’s worth observing that while Making a Murderer is more detached than those other docuseries—with a very uncinematic, nonfiction, brass-tacks style—the series also can’t help but evoke some other critically acclaimed series of the past few years.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Harlots is unsparing and sympathetic, able to find humor in its characters’ romps and compassion for the profession’s tragedies.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Perhaps this third one will exhaust the audience’s desire for sharks sliced in half by chainsaws; perhaps not. (Oh hell, no.)
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Literally everything in the show is ridiculous, in a way that is not even necessarily funny, just confusing; what eventually makes it work is how seamlessly it all fits together, from the cold opens in each episode to the completely absurd situations that Todd gets himself into.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s smart enough to make the mechanics and facts of its premise just plausible enough, but its real interest of exploration are the details that are relevant to the audience--what it is like for us, with our current values and awareness, to enter into times that are so far removed from where we are now.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Where “Louie” is frequently taken by flights of fancy and an inexhaustible curiosity about why the world is what it is, Better Things is, so far, more focused on the Fox family’s daily grind. The world is full of puzzles, but Sam and her daughters largely leave others to the solving.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The kinetic energy of the production wasn’t quite at the level of “Grease Live”, but the vocal performances and wonderful dance numbers made up for most of that. And most importantly, Hairspray Live! in the main was genuinely entertaining, even amid some messy moments of a huge production that seemed to be striving for a lot of different emotions all at once.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    A a behind-the-music celebrity miniseries with a surprising sense of humor and humility. ... It helps also that Carey--through sheer charm--makes what is essentially an eight-episode misdirect so delightfully human and engaging.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    But where “Battlestar Galactica’s” story engine ran almost entirely on mystery, The Expanse is a little more like “Game of Thrones,” with its intensely detailed and ever-broadening world inhabited by very recognizable characters.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The Missing is harrowing, absorbing, and difficult to stop watching; in its multifaceted storytelling about one toxic case in a small town, it offers a wide-ranging, intimate, and mercilessly honest view of human tragedy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s sometimes horrifying and sometimes silly, and at times, Search Party can get a tiny bit precious with its own cleverness. But when it works, it’s an astounding and engaging journey through genre conventions that should be at odds with each other.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The eight episodes together make for just four hours of television, which is only a bit longer than a very long movie; the natural breaks of title sequences and credits serve to break up the gleefully disjointed adventures into bookended chapters. And because making a prequel series 15 years later with the same actors set on just one day is patently ridiculous, the style of humor that Showalter and his longtime collaborator David Wain bring to Wet Hot American Summer: First Day Of Camp is spot-on: It embraces that absurdity, and pushes it to every possible extreme.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Perhaps it is a little over-the-top to remind our audience of B-movie thrillers in the midst of what is otherwise a negotiation between several rich adults. But the lingering taste of fear makes The Arrangement into a dark, delicious fantasy, one that feels voyeuristic even when it’s telling a scripted story.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The result is a show that is lushly intimate, the second season building on the foundation of the previous.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The third season isn’t nearly so neatly constructed [as the second]; the end of the season feels less like a conclusion and more like a plateau. But without the smooth lines of deliberate plotting, the show is able to find some really brilliant sweet spots.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    It is a plot that is reminiscent of nothing more than “Braveheart.” This might make Frontier a little predictable--but it’s a highly entertaining and satisfying journey, too, if you’re in the mood for it. The story is vast and at times either slow or confusing. But it always reads as considered and thoughtful--an adventure epic full of characters, not caricatures.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The political comedy, starring Nick Nolte and Sela Ward, is both genuinely funny and genuinely moving, displaying a kind of rigor in its storytelling that is frequently lost on networks new to original programming.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The Girlfriend Experience isn’t perfect. Christine’s motivations are sometimes opaque, and sometimes not; the plot is sometimes thrilling, and sometimes not. ... But it is riveting--and sexy--to watch Christine watch the rest of the world.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The premiere is the strongest, largely because Sudeikis is the perfect serious foil to Richardson and Robinson. (Sudeikis isn’t a regular cast member, but according to press materials, he will reprise his role as the Chrysler rep.) Without him, the show is a weirder journey, one that de-emphasizes story for the more elusive quality of atmosphere. But it’s a bizarre, rollicking joy to watch.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The pilot does everything it needs to, checking off the necessary boxes for the unwilling American hero-president in efficient, compelling scenes. This show isn’t going to be for everyone, but it comes with one of the highest-quality pilots broadcast is offering this fall, and it’s ABC’s strongest drama.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The series assembles a lot of different approaches in its one story, with a touch of the didactic tone of “American Crime.” But Guerrilla’s remove makes its concerns more accessible.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The drama is an enjoyable, ridiculous romp through the early days of the first Tudor king, Henry VII, and his marriage to Elizabeth of York, the titular white princess.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The result is a sprawling, beautiful show that is fascinating, brilliantly executed, and rather hard to follow.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    One thing is immediately clear about Stephen Colbert as the anchor of The Late Show: He’s very good at it. It’s impossible to take the measure of a show based on the first episode, but given the most superficial of impressions, the immediate takeaway is assurance. Colbert has this in the bag; it’s now just a question of letting him do his thing.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s fantastically made--a clearly written, beautifully rendered story of misdirected energy, bad science, megalomaniacs, and the many good intentions on the way to hell.... Still, it’s odd: In many ways, Going Clear is a collection of alleged abuses that have been reported on many times in the past; it’s revealing little to no new information on the church. Instead, it’s really an exercise in effective packaging.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    To Sinclair and Blichfeld’s credit, the HBO series presents its new season as one that can be appreciated by both first-time viewers and long-time fans. It builds on what’s happened before, but there are few inside jokes and veiled references--just the continued dedication to finding intimacy with these characters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Wayward Pines is a splashy, melodramatic thriller: smart enough to stay ahead of itself, well-made enough to keep the audience engaged; creepy enough to be delightful.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The Jinx can be a tad too self-referential at times, and unlike the hot-blooded thrill of the podcast “Serial,” this is a story whose particulars can all be found—albeit presented far less well—on Wikipedia. But it’s absorbing, due to the exhaustive research underpinning it and the hook of Durst’s actual, shiftless presence.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    With just two episodes made available for review, it’s difficult to say yet whether or not Mr. Robot will be able to produce a second season as wild and seductive as the first. But the show remains an artfully constructed receptacle for our cyber-paranoia, whether directed at the government, or capitalism, or technology, or most pressingly, one’s ability to betray oneself, with hallucinations or selective memory or--worst of all--a self-serving notion of the right thing to do.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    An absurdity that is disturbing real, funny at times, and depressing at others.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    I Love Dick is a treasure trove of charged moments, an intriguing dance of provocation, creation, and self-reflection. It digs to the roots of desire with unflinching curiosity. It is a daunting show to step into, with its scathing critiques and blunt personalities. But there is something cleansing and freeing about its unvarnished intimacy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Fortunately, Looking: The Movie is a lovely coda to a lovely show. It’s not always possible to get a satisfying ending out of television. But this one is also graceful, a closing pirouette that drops the curtain on these characters so that we can let them go, however unwillingly.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The new episodes aren’t perfect. Brooker, who has joint or solo writing credit on every installment, is more successful at building devastating second acts than he is at earning his endings, and several episodes turn again and again to social media’s terrors, as if vigilante justice and mob mentality didn’t exist before hashtags.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The show’s pastiche resolves into a gorgeous, fantastical tapestry of music legend and urban history, a reclamation of, and a love letter to, a marginalized community of a certain era, told through the unreliable tools of romance, intuition, and lived experiences. All that can be alienating, but simultaneously, the show feels like vital, radical work.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    In this third season, Inside Amy Schumer’s satire is sharper than ever, taking the contradictions of our world’s approach to gender and pushing them to the farthest logical extent.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s got some of the same appeal [as Scandal], but at its core, it’s a strong spy thriller with a few fascinating characters, not a splashy nighttime soap. And that’s okay.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Sonia Saraiya
    Even though the father-son territory has been trod before--in Halpern’s body of work alone!--it’s also where the show feels most alive.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    The show is not perfect. At times, Good Girls Revolt can be very smart about the themes of the ‘60s; at others, it can be painfully obvious. ... With a show that is as much about atmosphere as plot, some sprawl can be forgiven.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    I’m not entirely on board with all of Fuller’s operatic, bloody vision, but if it’s hard to watch, well, that’s the point.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    Broad City is still very funny. That being said, though, the second season is where the flaws in the show’s premise start to become more apparent, as more and more pressure is put on the structure.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    It remains to be seen if the strength of the performances from the rest of the cast (which includes another Academy Award nominee, Gabourey Sidibe--it might be hard to find work as a black actor, hm?) will balance out the show’s pulpy premise.... Empire is notable for doing something different, in a landscape populated by dramas of an entirely different stripe. For that, and that alone, it’s worth checking out.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    Vince Gilligan and his team, as usual, have surprised me. I haven’t totally fallen for the prequel series Better Call Saul--it doesn’t quite feel like its own show yet--but it did make me care about the man who becomes Saul Goodman in a way I never did in “Breaking Bad.”
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    Riverdale, the CW’s new teen drama based on the Archie comics, is an eerie and offbeat take on the high school mythos--both addictive and confusing in equal parts.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    I’m interested to see where The Path goes with its musings, because although it took me a while to accept the premise of the show, I cannot deny that it is well-made and thoughtful, if mostly concerned with the thoughts and feelings of very frustrating people.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    Like so many Netflix comedies, Santa Clarita Diet is a slow burn, and the first batch of episodes doesn’t quite deliver the sendup of suburbanite foibles that it could. But the seeds are all there.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    Generally an appealing little comedy, able to juggle things like identity and success and privilege and a general terror of aging with some nimble skill in a way that felt actually fresh.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    Casual is a weird show, and at first, it’s not entirely easy to go with its erratic flow.... The show is perplexing, but as evidenced by the care it shows for Laura’s fragile relationship with her father, or the siblings’ devotion to each other in the face of their egotistical, manipulative mother (Frances Conroy)--it has a poetry to it, too.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s a shaggy, ridiculous, tonally inconsistent show, and in the first two episodes, its pacing leaves something to be desired. But it owns its own nuttiness, which allows the audience to adjust its expectations accordingly--and makes for a fun, unexpected journey.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    Review gets a solid rating. Forrest MacNeil’s life? Zero stars.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    The Nightly Show With Larry Wilmore isn’t perfect, and it might not find its stride for a few weeks yet. But with this first episode, Wilmore and his team are demonstrating that they are not afraid of asking hard questions, whether those questions are about police brutality, representation in film, biracial identity, or how and when women feel safe in public. It takes a lot of skill to boil a complicated issue down to a single question; it takes even more to make that question funny.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    Nightcap is lightweight, rewarding, and extremely watchable comedy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    The inner snark is much of the appeal of the show--the ongoing soliloquy where Katie tells the truth, punctuated by Mixon’s skillful balance of eye-rolling cynicism, cheerful enthusiasm, and deep-seated worry.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    The show has dispensed with a lot of the real-world elements that made it so coldly compelling.... On the other hand, though, that purging of minor characters is setting the stage for a bigger drama entirely: the showdown between Claire and Frank.... It is a satisfying, slow build, and one that feels not just 13 episodes in the making but three seasons--not just three seasons but 30 years--for the inscrutable Claire Underwood.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    More often than not, Man in the High Castle doesn’t seem to know what it’s about but to its credit, it still manages to engage with its ideas in interesting, evocative ways. The show can sometimes produce moments of astonishing and quiet loveliness, even when the scope of the plot has gotten so strangely overbearing that the characters could be all Atlases, holding up the weight of the world.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    There’s a brazen quality to Doubt that is frothy enough to be silly but grounded enough to take on topical, controversial subjects. It doesn’t require too much effort to let unfold, and with such a talented, deep bench of actors, it’s usually enough to watch them bounce off of each other while flaunting their impossibly stylish accessories.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    The set and the substance feel a little dated, and the show leans into that ‘80s aesthetic with a bit of nostalgia that is both disorienting and a little comforting (much like going back to visit your parents’ house after moving out). That being said, once the show settles into its rhythms, there’s a lot of humor to go around.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    The show could certainly stand to find some more rhythm to its comedy, as it hammers out the right tone for the tricky comedy of minimum-wage Middle America. It’s neither the wildly confident (and brilliant) “Carmichael Show” nor the wildly predictable (and bad) “Undateable,” both on the same network. But even its raw edges and sticking points are appealing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    There’s a light, nimble humor to the show’s treatment of superpowers and heroic antics--a much needed respite from the angst and self-seriousness of so many superheroes on the small-screen, who are all so fixated on saving the world.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    Chicago Justice is not going to change our notion of courtroom dramas, but for what it is, it’s solid, satisfying stuff.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    The rest of the show is built around her, and it’s her performance that is able to make the show’s softer parts work, even as the show’s best moments showcase her skills.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Sonia Saraiya
    The original film’s strengths are washed out in this version, which is instead mining it for televisual drama.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    The Magicians tries to create three different worlds simultaneously--Quentin’s New York City, Fillory, and Brakebills, complete with different casts of characters and different sets of rules. It’s not as sloppy as it could be, but it’s hard to not feel rushed through the pilot.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    To its credit, Snatch the show is one of the better riffs on an original idea you’ll see on television, owing partly to its young and talented cast and partly to a few tweaks to the formula. But it’s still irritatingly derivative, when no derivation was really necessary.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    Tracey Ullman’s Show is like an oddity found at a flea market--interesting only to an audience who already reads something into it, or knows about where it came from, or is eager to add to a dusty, long-neglected collection.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    Grease: Live was so crammed with anachronisms--and so weirdly faithful to other things that should have been turned into anachronisms--that it landed somewhere between ‘50s time capsule and ‘50s themed-party, with some ‘50s-themed karaoke tossed in.... But overall, Grease: Live was a lot of fun. There were some poor decisions made by the producers, and some brilliant ones, too.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    Galavant is extremely silly--but at least it knows it’s silly.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    Though the central relationship is captivating, Divorce makes missteps with its comedy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    Helen now has a perspective, which adds a lot of necessary depth (and gives us the added benefit of seeing Tierney do more things on-screen, which is never a bad thing). But the show is paralyzed by its own vision, at times; the problem with making a show about singular perspectives is that those people are necessarily self-absorbed.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    Aside from being a vehicle for a fascinating performance, Nightingale doesn’t quite satisfy as more than a very well-executed student film--a one-trick pony whose trick we’ve seen before.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    It is frequently lovely to behold. The real Versailles is of course gorgeous, and the series renders the palace through expensive sets and substantial on-location filming. But like the plot, the prettiness is a little superficial; this is more the CW’s “Reign” than Starz’s “Outlander.”
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    Dates is a tad precious--a little too smart for its own good.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    The show isn’t great yet, though it has potential.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    The pilot is not exactly thoughtful. Queen of the South is more interested in being torrid and splashy than it is in offering the narrative gymnastics of a “Mr. Robot” or the ripped-from-the-headlines verisimilitude of “Narcos.” Rather, winning at the narcotics game seems to be enough for both the show and its heroine. But Braga is riveting as Teresa--believable and empathetic in a way that the rest of the cast isn’t, quite yet.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s a lot of unwieldy plot points--borrowing indiscriminately from “Alias,” “National Treasure,” and “John Doe.” What keeps it together is Alexander’s performance.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    Johnson himself is the best part of Ballers, a charismatic, mostly responsive force that is our window to the precarious world of retirement from football. His perspective on the life of the partying ball player is one of nostalgia. But in the absence of forward momentum, the camera turns to looking for shock value anywhere it can.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    And yet one wishes that Swanberg had tried a bit harder to get out of his intimate, meandering comfort zone. It would be interesting to see what Swanberg would produce if he gave himself a more difficult challenge.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    Not every episode of High Maintenance feels groundbreaking or perfect; despite being a set of loosely connected short films, few stand alone entirely. The second season--which is now funded by Vimeo, who will be charging a nominal fee for the six episodes--lets the show experiment with better production values and bigger casts. At times that gets in the way of the show’s quiet, intimate charm.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    A Very Murray Christmas is ruminating over its own mingled loneliness and disillusionment and occasional flights of whimsy; mostly, it’s busy laughing at its own jokes.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    There is merit to The Sinner, but it remains to be seen if the story will find a way to transcend its hokier elements to tell a larger story about mental illness or post-traumatic survival. Hopefully at some point the show will also explain who the titular sinner is supposed to be.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    While Barkley was tolerable and the segments choppy but intriguing, Simmons’ interview with Ben Affleck about the New England Patriots and the scandal termed “Deflategate” turned into one of the most fascinating character studies I’ve seen on a talk show.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    Nobodies is funny, and in a few specific details, it’s quite original. In others, it does unfortunately fit a template that seems difficult to escape in the current cutting-edge comedy scene. ... As it is, Nobodies could be easily confused with other shows on the same subject.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    What saves the show is that even when the humor doesn’t quite land--usually because it gets trapped in the tortured egos of the protagonists--the story of these flawed people attempting to be better is engaging.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    The A Word is guilty of some sloppy plotting and an over-investment in maudlin plots better left to more masterful chroniclers of the charms of small town life. But at its core, there is a fascinating and unique story of one child’s difficult-to-understand world, and his parents who are being dragged into compassion, kicking and screaming all the way.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 58 Sonia Saraiya
    Bad Judge is fine, but it’s unlikely that it’ll get the chance to be something good.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    [Red Oaks] is executed with a lot of flair and sophistication--a nearly deceptive amount of sophistication, really.... But mostly, the story is scattered and unfulfilling.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    The reality event series eventually reveals itself to be a slightly crotchety and mostly warmhearted buddy comedy about bucket lists.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    The 10-part series is the kind of layered sequential story that British comedy excels at, but is a bit too drawn-out and American to feel truly brilliant.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    This is not a show that is particularly original; every twist is a cliché, and every character is playing to type. But with so many well-worn at play, Dead of Summer makes for a schlocky hour that never quite gets boring.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s enlightening, but rarely serves as more than a rah-rah rally for Rep. Frank, who is the subject and source material for the film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    He neither excelled nor failed; it wasn’t perfect, but it wasn’t flawed, either.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    Season 3 is pushing harder to pop--with both color and threesomes--the show still doesn’t quite cohere into a compulsively watchable story.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    YouTube is a fascinating medium because of how intimate it can be; the viewer is brought right into the star’s bedroom to share in flights of fancy or upfront confessional. “Haters Back Off!” offers traces of that fascinating landscape, including moments where Miranda’s kooky, sullen frustration is completely understandable. But the show is too caught up in the foreground of attempting to be brutally funny with material that was fresh 12 years ago.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    The mere existence of When We Rise is almost virtue enough. But in terms of tone and execution, the four-part event series from ABC is wildly uneven, crossing from moving stories of romance under oppression to retellings of history that are so broadly pitched--and with such bad wigs!--that they’re too after-school special to be truly affecting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    A fourth season that, while competent, also feels somewhat beside the point.... This season the characters are making a concerted effort to change, but the show itself: not so much.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    Girlboss does not seem to know what it wants to be when it grows up. And while the potential is thrilling, it’s messy, too.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    Based on the pilot, Kevin Can Wait is a serviceably funny show that works best if the audience already accepts Kevin’s worldview.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    Clarkson, Hammond, and May’s love for machinery--and what human machinery indicates, which is adventure and expansiveness--is still present, pure, and appealing, even with the shift in networks and formats. ... Its ethos is also wrapped up in Clarkson’s glee at having escaped punishment, and in his mockery of the Prius and the bicycle for not being devoted to consuming fossil fuels as quickly and loudly as possible. The show is an embodiment of the self-righteousness of wrongheadedness.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    The 120-minute pilot released to critics is bloated and sometimes melodramatic; most of it is spent waiting for the inevitable to happen--for the good stuff to start.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s always interesting--Maslany is particularly transcendent when she acts as one clone disguised as another clone, which occurs again in season 3, and the show even finds a way to introduce waterboarding into its already politically charged narrative. But Orphan Black lost its grip on the story sometime early in season 2, and introducing even more characters has not proven to be a way to reclaim it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    An ultimately very well-produced after-school special--important and honest, yes, but unlikely to meaningfully reach its target audience.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    Without either dramatic stakes or grounded reality, Pure Genius is flat and saccharine, a longer version of the carefully pristine world seen in pharmaceutical commercials.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s deceptively difficult to build a surprising and complete story in just 40 minutes with so many characters. Yet This Is Us manages to both craft an intimate series of portraits and stitch them together. ... But at the same time, waves of cloying sentiment threaten to submerge everything.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    Atwell is skilled, but with just 42 minutes and a whole murder case to get through, her First Daughter backstory and the wide net cast for her character feel a lot like grasping at distant, barely visible straws. Still, Conviction is a fun watch, and a series that will likely resolve its initial hiccups.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 42 Sonia Saraiya
    The premiere tries to do too much with too little, and even though the cast gives it their all, Red Band Society never finds the right note.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 42 Sonia Saraiya
    The premise is ambitious and messily executed, as several contestants and judges are introduced without any clear metric of accomplishment or difference between the two.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 42 Sonia Saraiya
    For a show so bent on shock value, it has to this point failed to surprise much.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Feud is ultimately caught in an awkward limbo--neither as brilliantly campy and hateful as “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?” or as contextualizing and profound as “People v. O.J. Simpson.” Instead, it is primarily too long.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Taboo has far too much going on for its relatively thin material; it insinuates more than it says, and the first episodes only make sense if you are willing to believe that there is something intriguing about the “darkness” that James and sometimes Zilpha have at their core.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    It is, on some level, more than enough that "The OA" tries so hard and with such sincerity. "The OA" is fascinating and adventurous, both with formal limitations like episode runtime and narrative experimentation. ... But "The OA" is offering a story that cannot be thought about too deeply without falling quickly to pieces.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    The real question for The Blacklist: Redemption’s future success is whether or not Janssen and Eggold will be able to carry a title that has been, until now, entirely dependent on Spader’s magnetism. Based on the premiere, it seems unlikely--Tom is not even the second-most interesting character from “The Blacklist,” and Scottie’s mystique makes it hard to feel intimately connected to her character.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Downton Abbey is not even trying anymore.... despite its astonishing talent and productive values, took the path of predictable, repetitive soap opera.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Occasionally, his dog-ologue finds great material--such as Martin’s fear of an automatic door turning into the dawning realization that he must have secret powers over the universe--but that is smothered with oddly entitled “zingers” about the dog’s dissatisfaction with “monogamy.”
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    The pilot is hardly memorable at all, a pale facsimile of a thing that might have been funny, once.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Everything else is kind of a mess: The story never fully makes sense, and the characters are rarely fleshed out. It’s hard to begrudge the motorcyclists their fun, but Harley and the Davidsons is a historical production that doesn’t feel authentic in any capacity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Girls itself now knows how disposable its own plotting is, and is struggling to discover what all this ceaseless, fruitless discovery of self actually means. What remains are snapshots of a show that doesn’t quite know why it matters.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Allen’s decampment to television does not really feel like television; although Crisis in Six Scenes is in six episodes, there is little to distinguish it from an overlong Allen film. The episodes do not stand alone, and serialization does not add anything of note to the story.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Perhaps, if one took copious notes, consulted the show website’s “About” page, and discussed each element thoroughly in a subReddit, the convolutions in Falling Water would yield rewards. As it is, it’s hard to imagine finding the time for this dull, plodding thought experiment.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Good Behavior is a convoluted antihero crime drama, prone to episode bloat and pulpy titillation. Too little vision spread out over too many episodes, the blank spaces of Good Behavior throw its limitations--plot, perspective, performance, and a lot of product placement for automotive brands--into sharper relief.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    The show is far more invested in being a lightweight, soapy set of biopics--there’s a lot of meet-cutes in charmingly ‘50s spots, like the roller rink or the high school gym--that is more about playacting with a sanitized version of the ‘50s than it is about the history of this moment. It doesn’t help that Sun Records is devoid of plot.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    When Startup manages to leave its sex scenes behind and gets to creating storytelling around largely unexplored territory in the cinematic universe, it is its smartest and most compelling. ... Unfortunately, those moments of interest are sporadic. Startup otherwise meanders forward with all the grace of a sex-starved teenage boy, skidding from the exotic to the illicit.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    In the choice between making a good adaptation or a good film, L.M. Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables chooses... neither, content with being a dull film and a mediocre adaptation. It’s not poorly done as much as it’s just off, with an interpretation of the story that feels like a blurred copy of the original.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    As far as comfortable, mediocre family sitcoms go, Man with a Plan appears to be finding a nice groove, establishing a patter between easy stereotypes and incrementally encouraging Adam to grow.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Madoff is a miss, quite unable to measure up either on the outrage/explanation quotient (“The Big Short,” “Too Big to Fail”) or the reveling in billions quotient (“Billions,” naturally, as well as “Wolf of Wall Street”). As a piece of history, the miniseries is hard to follow and a bit too sordid; as a piece of fiction, Madoff feels rushed-off and incomplete.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Allegiance does not demonstrate any of that careful planning; indeed, it is almost exactly the same thing as “The Americans,” except executed less well, with the complexities sanded off.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    The new sitcom isn’t bad, it’s just bland; low-impact, lightweight, and nothing to write (or tweet) home about. It’s too bad for Epps, who does his best with a limited role.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s not freaky, or scary, or erotic, or even particularly weird. It’s just a kind of boring musical with a particularly nonsensical plot. The highlight is Laverne Cox, who plays Frank-N-Furter, the role made deliciously creepy by Tim Curry. Cox is the strongest performer in the production, and she has much of the necessary screen presence and vocal timbre to stand out in the middle of the mediocre spectacle.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Mars is a smart idea, and an educational one, too. But the factually dense production is not always able to accelerate from information to narrative.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Intriguing but unsatisfying.... The sketches aren’t thought out well enough; the lead, Jay Baruchel, lacks presence on-screen; and the drama lacks stakes. But above all, what struck me is that it’s a story that we’ve seen a thousand times.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    If Freakish had committed to far fewer characters, it might have perhaps been able to make sense of the leftover plotlines. As it is, the half-hour is overstuffed with characters it can’t carry--each with secretive subplots that the actors also cannot carry.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Their characters still do not feel particularly novel or real or interesting--or funny, sadly, which wastes both Fonda’s talent for physical comedy and Tomlin’s deadpan wit--but their friendship does eventually become real, which is something.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    The Catch, unfortunately, reads as an attempt to combine many of the elements of the previous shows into something new and fun without infusing enough originality into it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Not only does the music get lost in the mix, but despite Cannavale’s excellent performance as Richie, there’s almost nothing to invest in with that character, whom we’re introduced to at literally the least interesting point in his life.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Weatherly, who spent 13 seasons with “NCIS,” is an able charismatic lead--snarky and smart-alecky in a way that suggests both unnecessary toughness and vulnerability underneath it. ... But the show itself is totally ridiculous, in concept and execution.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 33 Sonia Saraiya
    Ray Donovan is in the remarkable position of being a show that appears to be built entirely of moments that are gratuitous, provocative, and emptily thrilling.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Sonia Saraiya
    Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll merely has the dramatic backdrop of loud guitars and middling lyrics. The show is so abrasive I had to stop watching partway through the second episode; even though I individually appreciate Corbett, Leary, Gillies, and rock music, the combination in the show offered nothing for me.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Sonia Saraiya
    As a production of television, The Passion’s main problem is that it didn’t quite know what it wanted to be--Christian “Glee,” Jesus-y “Romeo + Juliet,” or Tyler Perry’s megachurch concert extravaganza.... The real problem with The Passion: It was trying to engage a mainstream audience through pandering.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Sonia Saraiya
    It feels often as if the show cannot contain the anger and resentment it is trying to tap into, and instead of doing the work of converting it into comedy, it has just unleashed unpleasantness into the ether.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Sonia Saraiya
    In an unwieldy episode that otherwise felt strained, the elimination scenes where the women faced the judges were unusually compelling, mostly because of how excruciating they were.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s haphazardness that most radiates from the sitcom. Imaginary Mary feels a little hasty and half-baked, with a few ideas that point to interesting concepts without the full force of consideration behind any of them.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Sonia Saraiya
    The sitcom could have a little bit of melancholic sweetness to it, but The Great Indoors instead takes it upon itself to issue value judgments on an entire generation of people, and the result is perplexing and off-putting. It makes for a rather uncomfortable half-hour, where the audience is asked to identify with an undermining, insulting protagonist.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Sonia Saraiya
    Aside from Stroma, who is a charming fellow even in the worst circumstances, there is nothing to recommend in Time After Time, which feels neither adequately steeped in time travel or the lore of H.G. Wells to really deliver what its premise suggests.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Sonia Saraiya
    A nearly wall-to-wall mess. ... Every convoluted plot twist of the pilot feels like an unnecessary embellishment on top of an already nonsensical premise--because the show also fails to explain why this producer and this lawyer being friends with each other is unusual or interesting.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Sonia Saraiya
    It sits at the intersection of just enough sincerity and just enough script, which made shows like Laguna Beach famous. But clearly, the show hasn’t done enough to hide its PR tracks.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 20 Sonia Saraiya
    There is, undoubtedly, some camp appeal there, especially in Campbell’s performance as the histrionic Patsy. But the production is so limited, even on the level of pure spectacle, that it is difficult to see anything beyond its almost gleeful exploitation.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 10 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s screechingly awful.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 10 Sonia Saraiya
    One of the more aggressively terrible debuts of the fall.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 0 Sonia Saraiya
    Instead of just creating the horror show that is 12 women competing for a man, it chooses also to play them for fools.

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