For 415 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephanie Zacharek's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Stories We Tell
Lowest review score: 10 The Internship
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 20 out of 415
415 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Zacharek
    Is it entertainment? Is it satire? Is it art? It's probably a little of all three, and yet ultimately not quite enough of any.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Zacharek
    Everything in The Adventures of Tintin is meticulous - this is a Steven Spielberg movie, after all.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Zacharek
    What Cedar captures here is the way a father and son can be bound so tightly they almost choke the air out of one another. You can't exactly call it affection; it's that far more complicated thing we call kinship.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Zacharek
    Spirit counts for something too, and John Carter has plenty of that, in addition to the requisite dashes of wit.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Zacharek
    There's such a thing as having too much reverence for your material, and although Davies is an extraordinarily gifted and principled director, The Deep Blue Sea may suffer for that reverence.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Zacharek
    Rather than rushing to determine the cause of death – of love, or of a country -- it stubbornly keeps listening for a heartbeat, even though there may not be one.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Zacharek
    To Rome with Love - rangy, vaguely ridiculous and trepidatiously optimistic - is Allen's film for tomorrow.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Zacharek
    Ted
    One of the tricks of Ted -- perhaps its smartest one -- is that everyone, not just John, knows the bear can talk.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    For all the absurdity, there's also something strangely touching about it, maybe because for once Malick has allowed himself to be unsure. To the Wonder is an irresolute piece of work, a sketchbook of a movie, one made by a human being rather than an august master.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    It's an expressionist work, a story reinvented to the point of total self-invention, polished to a handsome sheen and possessing no class or taste beyond the kind you can buy. And those are the reasons to love it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Forster's meticulousness—coupled with ample excuses to blow stuff up—isn't enough to turn World War Z into one of those class-A end-of-everything movies that leaves you feeling just a little bit queasy, momentarily uncertain of your own small place in this unmanageable world.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Big Star may not be the best introduction for those who don't yet have at least some passing familiarity with the bruised-knee wistfulness of songs like "Thirteen," or the quavery undersea despair of "Kangaroo." But for anyone already curious, Nothing Can Hurt Me delivers the goods.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    People who don't understand movies often speak of them as escapism, a kind of passive fantasy. Lohan's performance in The Canyons, so naked in all ways, is the ultimate retort to that kind of idiocy: To watch it is to live in the moment.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    In the end, though, Our Nixon is an elusive piece of work. It doesn't add much to our understanding of the man himself, though admittedly, there may not be much more that we want or need to know, anyway.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    The movie is delightfully crude in places (including an instance of relay puking) and just plain silly-clever in others.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Even if Captain Phillips treads into some ideologically rough waters, there's one thing that's hard to find fault with: Hanks gives a performance that goes from good (through the first 124 minutes) to extraordinary (in the last 10).
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Tillman is clumsy in his handling of a few scenes, and considering what these kids are up against—junkie moms, drug-dealing pimp neighbors—the ending might be a little too implausibly upbeat. But Tillman seems to know that we need to go home feeling hope for Mister and Pete, who, it turns out, aren't so easily defeated.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Catching Fire suffers from the movie equivalent of middle-book syndrome: The story is wayward and rangy, on its way to being something, maybe, but not adding up to much by itself. Still, it’s entertaining as civics lessons go, and it’s a more polished, assured picture than its predecessor.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Mori — director of the 1991 documentary Building Bombs — assembles the information here with clarity and sensitivity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    It's hard to imagine Ms. 45 with any other actress. Lund is a particularly effective avenging angel, easily making the leap from innocent mouse to worldly wise killer.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    The Monuments Men fails in its grand ambitions, but it's still satisfying in bits and pieces, like a busted statue. Even a tribute made of shining fragments counts for something.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Lush with feeling that could easily be mistaken for sentimentality, Stalingrad is more like a 19th-century novel than a 21st-century blockbuster. It's theatrical and intense, sometimes in an overbearing way, but it's never boring.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Rise of an Empire might have been essentially more of the same, but for one distinction that makes it 300 times better than its predecessor: Mere mortals of Athens, Sparta, and every city from Mumbai to Minneapolis, behold the magnificent Eva Green, and tremble!
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    If you've never seen the show, it's a great excuse for binge-watching. And if you loved the show, the movie is a welcome homecoming. It has the feeling of a story that has been, against all odds, loved into existence. Probably because that's exactly what it is.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    This isn't so much a movie about sports as it is a riff on politics in the broad sense of the word, and the ways in which smart, insightful people play along to get along -- and then change the game for the better by following their gut.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    22 Jump Street isn't uncharitable or mean-spirited; at worst, it's just confused. Tatum is, predictably, adorable. His Jenko is a pumped-up naïf bumbling through life with a crooked smile, and Hill again makes a great sparring partner.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    The plot is needlessly busy, and much of the action is more manic and indistinct. But How to Train Your Dragon 2 cuts deeper than the first picture — it will be particularly resonant for anyone who has ever worked with or adopted rescue animals — and there are a few sequences of cartoon grandeur.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Berlinger covers lots of territory, including heartrending accounts from the family members of some of Bulger's victims. The whole exercise is fascinating, if vaguely unsatisfying.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    At times Jonah Hex carries whispery echoes of The Searchers and Sam Peckinpah.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    The problem is that just as we’re getting to know these characters as people, the movie pulls a veil over them: It loses its nerve and mutates into an only mildly compelling crime drama, albeit one whose protagonist is maybe more tortured than usual.