Stephanie Zacharek

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For 1,599 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephanie Zacharek's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Hamlet
Lowest review score: 0 Over Her Dead Body
Score distribution:
1599 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    It's nicely made, well shot, and reasonably well acted, yet it's enough to filet the life force right out of you. We need stories in order to dream, and to live. But that doesn't mean we have to buy every crappy one that comes down the pike.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    In terms of the gap between the movie it's trying to be and the movie it actually is, Mona Lisa Smile is in many ways indefensible. Yet for all its problems, it's satisfyingly movielike. The minutes drift by pleasurably and mindlessly.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Cold Mountain is a romance, refreshingly free from the taint of any political realities other than the "War is hell" variety. It's also completely juiceless.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    An eminently defensible light entertainment, peopled with characters that are easy to like and care about.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Suffers from a lack of conviction.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    So unself-conscious and breezy that you find yourself sailing along with it; its flaws become as negligible as harmless barnacles nestled well below the water line.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Mel Gibson may have changed the face of cinema forever. I think he has: He's made the first true Jesusploitation flick, a picture that, despite its self-righteous air of grave religiosity, is barely spiritual at all.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Even as a nostalgia ride, Starsky & Hutch poops out before it ever gets going.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Instead of taking us someplace we fear to go, Secret Window leads us to a place we've already been -- we know it so well, we could write the book on it ourselves.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Spartan is the same old stuff, but now it's been thoroughly Mametized, like a spray-on treatment you could spritz out of a can.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    The Replacement Killers has a plot -- barely -- but no story.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Isn't really a movie but a blatant girls' night out vehicle.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    The reality is that it's neither hip nor funny: Instead, it's excessively broad one minute and unctuously instructional the next.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Never as delightful and silly as it needs to be. The action is often manic, and there's a veneer of unapologetic corniness to it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    I, Robot strives to be so many things that it ultimately falls away to nothing, a heap of expensive metal parts.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Toothless, gutless, one-note political movies like Jonathan Demme's The Manchurian Candidate, a picture that purports to have a galvanizing, liberal-minded theme (big business is taking over our country and our lives) but is really just ploddingly pedestrian.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    So captivating to look at that you can almost forget there's virtually nothing to it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    A little like the '80s crowd-pleaser "Ghost," but way artier.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    The difference is that Michael Caine delivered the impossible; Jude Law can't.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Here, Lynch has traded some of his disturbing originality for noir formula and schticky weirdness.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Jon Voight shows up as Ben's daddy, and Harvey Keitel plays a devilishly goateed FBI agent: They're the only two actors who seem to have a sense of how ridiculous National Treasure is, but there's not enough of them to carry the picture.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    So bloodless that it feels like an act of arty dishonesty.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Overburdened with knowingly charming touches. It's waterlogged with whimsy.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    If there's any reason to bother with Meet the Fockers, it's to see Hoffman and Streisand.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    It's dull in a very tasteful way, with none of the reverberating tenderness and sometimes surly vigor that characterize Rohmer's best work, things like "Summer" and "The Aviator's Wife."
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    A simple entertainment that's by and large carried on the backs of its actors, some who are wonderful and others who are merely likable.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Does feature one or two jump-out-of-your-skin moments.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Through its first two-thirds, at least, Hide and Seek does a good enough job of piquing our curiosity that the movie's ultimate dumbness is more than a minor insult.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    As lousy as it is, Diary of a Mad Black Woman is weirdly fascinating.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    A disappointingly blunt, monochrome work.

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