Stephanie Zacharek
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For 1,434 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephanie Zacharek's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Bourne Ultimatum
Lowest review score: 0 The Amityville Horror
Score distribution:
1,434 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Mysterious Skin isn't a picture about existential vacancy; it isn't even about anything so simplistic as the horrors of child abuse. It's more of a meditation on the necessity of making your way past, or through, any obstacle that prevents you from being a thinking, feeling person.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Stephanie Zacharek
    If nature -- if life -- is as wild and precious as the movie makes it out to be, Hirsch needs to give us something, someone, to watch on-screen. We need to feel a presence before we can take the measure of an absence.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    A clever picture, and something of a novelty -- it's not going to change the face or direction of horror filmmaking in any drastic way. But it's fun to watch something that's so obviously made with love.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    At its best when Creadon is burrowing deep into the world of the puzzles themselves, particularly when he sits down with puzzle constructor extraordinaire Merl Reagle.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Stephanie Zacharek
    One of the most inventive and joyous movies of the year.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    De Niro's performance works because it isn't exactly likable -- he's totally at ease with his own jokes, but he's not out to make us feel relaxed.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Super Size Me is exploratory, as opposed to being just numbingly didactic, and that's what makes it so engaging.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    Heading South is a seemingly straightforward and simple picture that's really defiantly complex, sexually, politically and emotionally.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    I'd put To's Exiled -- into the category of Hong Kong movies that even people who think they don't care about Hong Kong movies should see.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Cold Mountain is a romance, refreshingly free from the taint of any political realities other than the "War is hell" variety. It's also completely juiceless.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    A sweet, modest snapshot of a long-lost time when a bold kid with a showbiz dream and a little luck could actually get somewhere, and if he could sing and dance to boot, his chances of success would be even greater. Zac Efron fits right into 1937; in 2009, he's a lost boy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    A well-meaning little picture that's piercingly genuine in places and annoyingly affected in others.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 85 Stephanie Zacharek
    It's the kind of movie that makes the world feel like a smaller place, suggesting that the similarities connecting us across continents and cultures are more resonant than the things that divide us.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 65 Stephanie Zacharek
    Between the Truffautish voice-overs and Jacques Demy-style musical interludes, it's a wonder anyone in this sort-of drama, sort-of comedy ever gets any rest.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Stephanie Zacharek
    Cars is an elaborate concoction all right. But it feels soldered together from a scrap heap of tired ideas.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    The picture is beautifully paced, with an exhilarating, comically violent opening, a halcyon middle section where, in what could be viewed as a sideways homage to "Rebel Without a Cause," our rootless wanderers share a brief respite in an empty, lavish mansion, and a finale filled with light and color and movement (as well as piles of vanquished zombies).
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    A sweet and sexy celebration of real women's real bodies.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    Isn't bold or daring, but it is delicately distinctive; it's the kind of picture that stirs subterranean rumbles of empathy in us rather than flashy, gushing waves.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    This quiet French thriller gets to the heart of motherhood, and then pays off with comfort and calm.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    So refreshingly straightforward that at first you may not know what to make of it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Stephanie Zacharek
    The Hangover is a shaggy-dog tale that's actually, when you step back from it, perfectly shaped.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    The women of Pussy Riot have an idea of what the new Russia should sound like; Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer shows just how hard it is to make that new world audible.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    This is a superb, delicately calibrated comic performance: Carell never allows the character to swerve into excessive cuddliness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Smart, tightly coiled.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 20 Stephanie Zacharek
    Extravagant in movie terms but stingy in emotional ones, it embodies all of Spielberg's bad impulses and almost none of his good ones: It's a grand display of how well he knows how to work us over, and yet the desperation with which he tries to get to us is repulsive.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    It's valuable for both the vintage footage Rostock has collected and for the observations provided by Belafonte, who is as charming, handsome and persuasive in his mid-80s as he ever was.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    This is a story told in shards; Wong is so obsessed with visual details – faces refracted as if in a broken mirror, or fragile arcs of blood being traced out on the pavement by the feet of two feuding kung fu masters – that the story he’s trying to tell is partly obscured by them.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    It's dull in a very tasteful way, with none of the reverberating tenderness and sometimes surly vigor that characterize Rohmer's best work, things like "Summer" and "The Aviator's Wife."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Feels like a movie that keeps wishing it were something else: an award-winning play, a grand novel, an epic poem, anything but that populist thing we call a movie. Mendes makes movies as if he hates them.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Stephanie Zacharek
    Ben Affleck is smart about setting the scene -- he's even better at it than Clint Eastwood was in another Lehane adaptation, "Mystic River." But he's less adept at defining individual personalities, at making us care about the characters who deserve our sympathy -- or, maybe more important, the ones who don't.