Stephanie Zacharek

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For 1,767 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephanie Zacharek's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Before Sunset
Lowest review score: 0 The Amityville Horror
Score distribution:
1767 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    Over and over, American Honey calls attention to how observant it is, rather than just being observant.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    As with most animated films today, there’s lots of boring bromides about “family” and “belonging” that you have to suffer through to get to the good stuff.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    The picture is action-packed but mindlessly so, and it’s neither light enough to work as a coltish entertainment nor smart enough to cut beyond anything but the most rote notions of masculinity.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Stephanie Zacharek
    A coming-of-age movie, and a love story, that leaves you feeling both stripped bare and restored, slightly better prepared to step out and face the world of people around you, with all the confounding challenges they present. There’s not much more you can ask from a movie.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Stephanie Zacharek
    As shot by the gifted cinematographer Seamus McGarvey, Nocturnal Animals is beautiful—or at least arresting—every minute, and it sure isn’t boring. But it’s unclear exactly what Ford is trying to say, though it’s clear he’s trying hard to say something. And that’s the most frustrating thing about this picture.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Stephanie Zacharek
    Both gentle and staggering, an examination of the way our personal experiences can spur creativity—or render it inconsequential.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    I don’t think you could tell this story properly or honestly without being forthright about the horrors of the Pacific Theater, and as Gibson dramatizes them, they put Doss’ actions in jaggedly sharp perspective.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Adams gives a nicely polished, muted performance: She keeps the story grounded when the ideas Villeneuve is striving for threaten to get too lofty. And the picture is intelligently and effectively crafted, one of those enterprises where the cinematography, sound design and score, as well as the special effects, melt into a seamless, organic whole.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Stephanie Zacharek
    La La Land is both a love letter to a confounding and magical city and an ode to the idea of the might-have-been romance, in all its piercing sweetness. It’s a movie with the potential to make lovers of us all. All we have to do is fall into its arms.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Stephanie Zacharek
    Bridges knows just what he’s doing, and with the splendid West Texas waltz of a drama, Hell or High Water, British director David Mackenzie has given him the perfect hook on which to hang his hat.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Stephanie Zacharek
    Lowery stumbles, working too hard to squeeze a response from us.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Stephanie Zacharek
    Harley Quinn’s entrance is the best moment in Suicide Squad. After that, you can leave. Robbie is a criminally appealing actress, likable in just about every way, but that intro aside, Suicide Squad doesn’t serve her well. It serves no one well, least of all its audience.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    You don’t need to be a woman working in finance to get a shivery thrill—and possibly a few chills—from watching Equity, a modestly scaled but perceptive drama about an investment banker who just happens to be a woman.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Stephanie Zacharek
    Greengrass, a meticulous, thoughtful filmmaker (he also directed the second and third films in the series, The Bourne Supremacy and The Bourne Ultimatum), clearly believes in what he’s doing. But his earnestness is at odds with the movie’s desperate, frenetic desire to keep us engaged every minute.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    Lin keeps this tense adventure (co-written by Doug Jung and Simon Pegg, who also reprises his role as chief engineer Scotty) from stumbling over its own excess: he knows that any good Star Trek needs wit as well as spectacle.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    The movie glows with vitality, thanks largely to the performers, who revel in one another’s company.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    So where’s the line between rigid parental standards and possible abuse? Captain Fantastic crab-walks tentatively toward that question, and even though its conclusion feels rushed, the movie still works as a portrait of an unorthodox family that’s well adjusted in its own odd way.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Stephanie Zacharek
    Goldblum manages to rise above the proceedings via his invisible jetpack of dry wit — thank God for that. The only newcomer who emerges unscathed is Gainsbourg, who glides through this mess with Zen equanimity—even as chaos reigns, she keeps her cool.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Cheerful and efficient, this is the stripey tights of melodramas.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Together, the three wheel through absurd gags that shouldn’t work and somehow make them sing, giving the movie a loose, joyous energy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    The modest pleasures of The Nice Guys lie not in following the wiggy story twists but in watching Gosling and Crowe mix it up and mess everything up.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    This ambitious blend of live action and computer animation runs the risk of being overwhelming and sterile, but it turns out to be a pleasing and sweet-natured adventure thanks in large part to Spielberg’s big, friendly secret weapon: Mark Rylance, as the BFG himself.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    The Neon Demon isn’t much of movie, at least if you’re looking for an actual story. Nor is it a moralistic fable about the emptiness of Hollywood—if anything, it’s a winking mockery of that sort of thing. But whatever the heck it is, it throws off a chilly, pleasurable sheen. This is visual hard candy.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    Nichols—director of Take Shelter, Mud and, most recently, Midnight Special—tells the Lovings’ story in a way that feels immediate and modern, and not just like a history lesson.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    Somehow, it works, thanks largely to Farrell.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    Like the provocative classics Dog Day Afternoon and Network, this is discomfiting entertainment–its edges are serrated, sharp enough to cut. The camera moves to just the right place every minute, and the editing is crisp. Moments of nearly unbearable tension are broken by bursts of energy and even humor.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    It’s that rare superhero movie that doesn’t grind you down with nonstop action or, worse yet, the usual tiresome cavalcade of smart-ass wisecracks.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Stephanie Zacharek
    There’s only one reason to see The Huntsman: Winter’s War: Gowns! Insane, off-the-hook gowns.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    You’ve seen every element of Sing Street hundreds of times before — it’s Carney’s knack for assembling them that makes the difference. In his hands, this isn’t just a nostalgia trip. It’s an homage to teenage kicks and the urgency of getting them any way you can.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    Somehow this Jungle Book works, because Favreau has both a sense of humor and a sense of spectacle.

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