Stephanie Zacharek

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For 1,740 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephanie Zacharek's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Logan Lucky
Lowest review score: 0 Speed Racer
Score distribution:
1740 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Stephanie Zacharek
    Don't Think I've Forgotten is a testament to how much a song can mean: You can destroy the vinyl it's been recorded on, but the sound itself, and all it stands for, is indestructible. Groove is in the heart.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Stephanie Zacharek
    This is a dignified piece of filmmaking, and one that uses brutality to great effect.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Stephanie Zacharek
    Especially for a movie that springs from a horrific and grisly crime, True Story feels undershaped and indistinct; it’s too dispassionate to be genuinely chilly.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Stephanie Zacharek
    Dior and I is a great fashion movie, but it's also a superb picture about the art of management, applicable to any field.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Stephanie Zacharek
    The movie's true center, the meteorological phenomenon that makes it so pleasurable to watch, is the half-prickly, half-affectionate interplay between Binoche and Stewart.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Stephanie Zacharek
    You can feel the good intentions vibrating off the screen, but it's still a listless affair, one that takes forever to go almost nowhere. The picture struggles so valiantly to be a woman's empowerment fable that it leaves you wishing for just a little romance.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Stephanie Zacharek
    For all the full-throttle dazzle of Furious 7, the best scenes are the quietest ones, in which these characters make observations about love, life, and family that would seem overcooked in any other movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Stephanie Zacharek
    If director Tim Johnson -- adapting Adam Rex's book The True Meaning of Smekday -- can't do much with the story's confused, if well-intentioned, agenda, at least he's got some charming, vivid characters to work with.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Stephanie Zacharek
    Baumbach has made some fine pictures (Frances Ha) and some deadening, hermetic ones (Margot at the Wedding), but it's While We're Young that really fulfills the promise of his brash but fine-grained debut.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Stephanie Zacharek
    The movie Wenders and Juliano have made is a tribute that feels both grand and modest in scale: Just as Salgado's photographs do, it extends the notion of friends and family to include every citizen of the world.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Stephanie Zacharek
    Even beyond its charismatic star, Jauja is captivating, not least because of Alonso's ability to capture the cruel beauty of the natural landscape — you can almost see the earth itself refusing to accept European imperialism blithely.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Penn’s vanity — both in the way he shows off his bod and in the way he drives home the nobility of the once-wayward Terrier — is either the most deeply annoying thing about The Gunman, or the one thing in it that actually works. I’m leaning toward the latter.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    The film Hawke has made — which borrows its title, though little else, from J.D. Salinger — works both as a celebration of Bernstein, whose spirit is at once gentle and boldly generous, and as a way of exploring creativity and the meaning it can have in our lives.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    This Cymbeline is brash and inventive and more than a little wild. Perhaps we've been wrong about this play all along.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Stephanie Zacharek
    Like all of Branagh's films, even some of the bad ones, Cinderella is practically Wagnerian in its ambitions — it's so swaggering in its confidence that at times it almost commands us to like it. But it's also unexpectedly delicate in all the right ways, and uncompromisingly beautiful to look at.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    In the end, listing this sequel’s flaws and charms is a loser’s game, and I throw up my hands: I just had fun, maybe mostly because watching these actors brings me so much joy. There’s nothing second best about that, or about them.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    The story Levine spins out of this premise has a rambunctious, woolly quality, though in the end there may be too many stringy loose ends for him to weave in properly. Still, Wild Canaries has its quiet charms.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Stephanie Zacharek
    The fact that Cronenberg directed almost works against Maps to the Stars: We expect greatness from him, not just proficiency, and he doesn't exactly have a gift for comedy, not even the black kind. But the movie still has the darkly glittering Cronenberg touch, even if it's just a light brushing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Stephanie Zacharek
    Wild Tales is loose-limbed, rowdy, and exhilarating — in its vibrant lunacy, and with its cartoonishly brash violence, it's a little bit Almodóvar, a little bit Tarantino.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    What We Do in the Shadows is never as self-conscious as you fear it might be, and it has some of the loose, wiggy energy of early Jim Jarmusch, only with more bite. It makes getting poked a pleasure.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Stephanie Zacharek
    Mommy is first and foremost a mother-and-son story, but it's also a surprisingly delicate exploration of lonely lives, and the temporary islands of companionship that make them bearable.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    Levinson and Pacino's willingness to explore the creakier end of life isn't a drawback; it's what gives The Humbling its bittersweet vitality.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Black Sea is so almost-terrific that it's ultimately more disappointing than a movie that's merely badly or carelessly made.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Stephanie Zacharek
    Strickland builds the film, artfully, into a complex and ultimately moving essay on the privileges of victimhood and the nuances of what it means to suffer for love.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Stephanie Zacharek
    The triumph of Still Alice is that it’s not about an illness; it’s about a person.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Stephanie Zacharek
    There’s visual thinking everywhere you look in Blackhat, which is great until you realize that it’s bled into a kind of overthinking — the movie is too much of a good thing, an exercise that flattens any potential exhilaration or excitement into the sensation of grading a term paper.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    The Spierigs had the framework for something wonderful here, if only they’d trusted themselves to keep things simple.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    Although there's nothing sensationalistic about his approach, [Graf] treats the characters' tentative, often problematic bohemianism as a wild, brave, and precious thing, and the lead actors — restrained where it counts and bold where it matters — are a pleasure to watch.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 40 Stephanie Zacharek
    Grand in its aims but tepid in its conclusions, A Most Violent Year burns slow and gives off very little heat. It's not really that violent. But it sure feels like a year.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Stephanie Zacharek
    This is a dense, multilayered picture, one firmly rooted in a specific landscape, a dramatic coastal spot dotted with the carcasses of decrepit fishing boats, as well as the magnificent skeleton of one long-dead whale.

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