For 228 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephen Cole's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Pool
Lowest review score: 25 The Condemned
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 28 out of 228
228 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Cole
    Detective Dee is the action flick of the year, a two-hour epic that blows the "Pirates of the Caribbean" to the Bermuda Triangle.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    After witnessing the wearying parliamentary debates among good and bad senators in recent Star Wars episodes, it's a pleasure to watch a sci-fi movie where more than just the spaceships move quickly.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    It’s a corny, old fashioned boy-dog love story, as adorable as anything Walt Disney ever signed off on.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    A typically hypnotic, slow-coiling drama from 80-year-old French filmmaker, Jacques Rivette.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Michelle Monaghan's clowning response to her boyfriend's sudden histrionics lends the drama a giddy fizz.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    As expected, it has gaping holes where back stories used to be. Still, it's a historical war movie with impressive sweep, strong characterizations and the kind of idiosyncratic flourishes that made Woo such an irresistible storyteller.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    The film lacks the comic ingenuity of the best in CGI critter movies. It's not fun-for-the-whole-family, like "Shrek." Still, it's a howl and amazement for anyone under 12.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Though only 85 minutes, the film captures an entire, bewilderingly extended family and way of life inside a sturdy frame.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    An amused and affectionate look at the writer who formed a crucial link between the New Journalism of the 1960s and today's blogosphere.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    By hiring James Earl Jones to narrate, Disney has prepared youngsters to understand that man is equally capable of heroism and villainy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Good Hair is also about how African-Americans spend $9-billion annually chemically treating and straightening their hair, buying 80 per cent of America's hair products. It's such a fascinating, complex tale that you hope one day some probing filmmaker will make a conclusive documentary on the subject.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Von Trier's proficiency at the quicksilver business of comedy comes as a surprise, given the grinding seriousness of earlier films.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Warrior is a weirdly affecting hybrid, a 100-proof melodrama that's two-thirds Sylvester Stallone and one-third Eugene O'Neill. Think Rocky's "Long Day's Journey into Night."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Dragonslayer documents what happened when California stopped dreaming.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Cole
    A mess of a movie – a sprawling PowerPoint argument that covers too much ground way too fast, dispensing Wikipedia-calibre essays on a variety of subjects, from a blurred bio of J. Robert Oppenheimer, creator of the atom bomb, to an unsatisfying sidebar on A.Q. Khan, the world's first door-to-door nuke salesmen.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    As Blank City proves, the all-night, every-night party was fun while it lasted.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Cole
    Though beautiful to look at and graced with moments of ticklish camp, The Skin I Live In is also sluggish, arbitrarily conceived and, especially in its sagging middle, unaccountably dull.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Stephen Cole
    Noir connoisseurs, however, will receive Moverman's latest like a double-bourbon from heaven. Rampart is the best crime-movie fix from Hollywood since "Gone Baby Gone."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Contagion isn't meant to provide delicious roller-coaster chills. Released two days before the 10th anniversary of 9/11, it's a film meant to scare the bejesus out of us.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    Rallies in the last reel.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Cole
    Cold Souls begins to lose its comic focus, however, when Giamatti comes to realize that he needs his soul back.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Todd Solondz isn't for everyone, maybe not even most people...he's a comic filmmaker whose idea of entertainment is shredding chum into a shark tank.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    In a better work, the filmmaker would talk to hardcore punks about their parents, affairs, regrets, dreams and day jobs in an effort to explore the fledgling movement. Here, however, we get little more than a marathon MTV rap session, as Rachman drives about North America, yakking with aging punk heroes about the good ol' bad ol' days.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    A stylish, sharply observed erotic mystery.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    For all North Country's blockbuster elements, the film remains a curiously uninvolving affair.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    Alas, the filmmaker, maybe because he had to account for every week of his more than year-long visit to the Times, has crowded his film with too many subplots and way, way too many cameos of all the usual suspects, wringing their hands over what will become of newspapers.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Cole
    Has a provocative, ticklish premise – five North England Muslims become suicide bombers, but can't decide who or what to take with them.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Watching Moon is kind of like seeing a booster rocket thrust seventies' sci-fi films deeper into orbit.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    The star of Sound of My Voice is co-screenwriter, female lead Brit Marling, who plays Maggie with melancholy, amusement and scorn. Compulsively watchable, she can change who we think she is by simply turning her face. In profile, she's Vanessa Redgrave. Laughing, she becomes Debbie Reynolds. Marling might become a great character actress. Let's hope the movies use her well.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    Robocop isn't going to win Verhoeven any medals - the focus remains on action, guns and gore - but it's a flashy movie with enough wit to be more than just another dumb bucket of bolts. [17 Jul 1987]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

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