Stephen Dalton
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For 54 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1 point higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephen Dalton's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 90 For Those in Peril
Lowest review score: 20 Mortdecai
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 27 out of 54
  2. Negative: 4 out of 54
54 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Dalton
    Haunting and atmospheric, For Those in Peril proves that creeping grief and guilt can deliver just as much dread-filled dramatic tension as a straight horror movie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    The film repays patient viewing as it evolves into an engrossing, nuanced, philosophical drama.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    Baird can be forgiven for a handful of careless and ham-fisted touches. Filth is still a hugely entertaining breath of foul air fueled by McAvoy’s impressively ugly star performance.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    A Field in England is a rich, strange, hauntingly intense work from a highly original writer-director team.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    Dolan's fifth feature feels like a strong step forward, striking his most considered balance yet between style and substance, drama-queen posturing and real heartfelt depth.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    A deluxe multi-character drama that blends real history with semi-fictionalized spy thriller and soap opera elements, Burning Bush feels in places like an extended Czech remake of the Cold War-themed German Oscar-winner The Lives of Others.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    Beautifully shot with an acute eye for crisp composition, this intimate mood piece explores the subtle intricacies and low-level power struggles of long-term love in forensic detail.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    An ingenious micro-budget science-fiction nerve-jangler which takes place entirely at a suburban dinner party, Coherence is a testament to the power of smart ideas and strong ensemble acting over expensive visual pyrotechnics.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    Red Army is a slick, witty, fast-moving blend of sports story and history lesson.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    Tales of the Grim Sleeper is unusually somber and conventional by Broomfield's standards, relying more on slow accumulation of detail than caustic commentary or ambush interviews. But it has a quiet emotional force which pays off during the powerful final sequence.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    The sleepy-paced, elementally simple plot initially requires a degree of patience, but the story ends up gently absorbing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    However mindless and heartless it may be, Through the Never succeeds as pure sense-swamping spectacle. It is a blow-out banquet for Metallica fans, and a blockbuster rock-and-rollercoaster ride for any heavy metal tourists curious to see this music played at major-league level.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Weekend of a Champion begins as a motorsports movie but ends up a portrait of two wily elder statesmen who have survived into their seventies by skill, stealth and sheer luck.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    The young Spanish director Eugenio Mira and his American screenwriter Damien Chazelle have fun paying homage to the pulpy potboilers of yesteryear.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    The tone veers into film-fan geekery in places, but Jodorowsky is such a natural showman and irrepressible egotist that his ancient anecdotes never become tedious.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Though not the finest screen outing for Coogan’s best-known alter ego, this is a worthy addition to the ever-growing Partridge archive, with enough weapons-grade comic zing in the first half to excuse the less sure-footed second.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Finely acted and minutely observed, Ilo Ilo certainly has the texture of real life. The performances feel authentic, the emotional shadings agreeably nuanced.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    An unflinching portrait of state-sponsored evil, Manuscripts Don’t Burn feels like the work of an angry artist who has been jailed, censored and harassed too long. This time it’s personal.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Drones is not exactly subtle, but it is a commendable attempt to dramatize a hot contemporary issue without resorting to clumsy didacticism or obvious political bias.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Gebbe has made a robust and compelling first feature, deftly shot and ably acted, especially by its younger cast members.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    An uneven mix of serious issue movie and sensational thrill ride, Honour is no masterpiece, but it is an accomplished debut.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    There are so many witty touches and sharp little observations here that The Strange Little Cat can be forgiven for ultimately making no dramatic statement.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Goldberg has made a commendably adventurous and mostly enjoyable meta-comedy that recalls both the best and worst of 1970s Hollywood.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Strickland and Fenton bring an extra layer of visual invention, smartly expanding on the show's pre-existing video elements and adding their own bespoke cinematic touches.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    With a scare factor far greater than its modest dimensions initially seem to promise, The Canal is a polished indie psycho-thriller full of macabre twists and nerve-snapping tension.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Even if it tells us nothing new, Pulp is still a handsome cinematic homage to a unique band, a proud city and the unifying power of pop music.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Inevitably harrowing and sickening in places, but with tender and uplifting moments, Night Will Fall is a somber treatment of a serious topic which earns its place in the broad pantheon of Holocaust-themed cinema. It is just a shame that Singer's worthy memorial feels a little too small for its world-shaking theme and world-famous cast list.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Dalton
    There are just enough laugh-out-loud moments here to excuse the lurches into shameless, tear-jerking sentimentality.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Dalton
    Any sense of narrative momentum or intellectual focus quickly unravels as the film evolves into an almost wordless symphony of disconnected images, sounds and music. But the nature-heavy montages are mostly beautiful and bizarre enough to excuse the film’s pretentious excesses.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Dalton
    Strip away the Middle East backdrop and Bethlehem is a fairly routine thriller about good cops, corrupt bureaucrats and armed criminal gangs.

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