For 33 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephen Dalton's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 80 Exhibition
Lowest review score: 30 Grace of Monaco
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 33
  2. Negative: 1 out of 33
33 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    The film repays patient viewing as it evolves into an engrossing, nuanced, philosophical drama.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    Baird can be forgiven for a handful of careless and ham-fisted touches. Filth is still a hugely entertaining breath of foul air fueled by McAvoy’s impressively ugly star performance.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    A Field in England is a rich, strange, hauntingly intense work from a highly original writer-director team.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    Dolan's fifth feature feels like a strong step forward, striking his most considered balance yet between style and substance, drama-queen posturing and real heartfelt depth.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    A deluxe multi-character drama that blends real history with semi-fictionalized spy thriller and soap opera elements, Burning Bush feels in places like an extended Czech remake of the Cold War-themed German Oscar-winner The Lives of Others.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    Beautifully shot with an acute eye for crisp composition, this intimate mood piece explores the subtle intricacies and low-level power struggles of long-term love in forensic detail.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    An ingenious micro-budget science-fiction nerve-jangler which takes place entirely at a suburban dinner party, Coherence is a testament to the power of smart ideas and strong ensemble acting over expensive visual pyrotechnics.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    The sleepy-paced, elementally simple plot initially requires a degree of patience, but the story ends up gently absorbing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    However mindless and heartless it may be, Through the Never succeeds as pure sense-swamping spectacle. It is a blow-out banquet for Metallica fans, and a blockbuster rock-and-rollercoaster ride for any heavy metal tourists curious to see this music played at major-league level.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Weekend of a Champion begins as a motorsports movie but ends up a portrait of two wily elder statesmen who have survived into their seventies by skill, stealth and sheer luck.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    The young Spanish director Eugenio Mira and his American screenwriter Damien Chazelle have fun paying homage to the pulpy potboilers of yesteryear.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    The tone veers into film-fan geekery in places, but Jodorowsky is such a natural showman and irrepressible egotist that his ancient anecdotes never become tedious.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Though not the finest screen outing for Coogan’s best-known alter ego, this is a worthy addition to the ever-growing Partridge archive, with enough weapons-grade comic zing in the first half to excuse the less sure-footed second.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Finely acted and minutely observed, Ilo Ilo certainly has the texture of real life. The performances feel authentic, the emotional shadings agreeably nuanced.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    An unflinching portrait of state-sponsored evil, Manuscripts Don’t Burn feels like the work of an angry artist who has been jailed, censored and harassed too long. This time it’s personal.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Drones is not exactly subtle, but it is a commendable attempt to dramatize a hot contemporary issue without resorting to clumsy didacticism or obvious political bias.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Gebbe has made a robust and compelling first feature, deftly shot and ably acted, especially by its younger cast members.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    An uneven mix of serious issue movie and sensational thrill ride, Honour is no masterpiece, but it is an accomplished debut.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Dalton
    There are just enough laugh-out-loud moments here to excuse the lurches into shameless, tear-jerking sentimentality.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Dalton
    Any sense of narrative momentum or intellectual focus quickly unravels as the film evolves into an almost wordless symphony of disconnected images, sounds and music. But the nature-heavy montages are mostly beautiful and bizarre enough to excuse the film’s pretentious excesses.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Dalton
    Strip away the Middle East backdrop and Bethlehem is a fairly routine thriller about good cops, corrupt bureaucrats and armed criminal gangs.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Dalton
    The story is rich in juicy anecdotes and epochal events, even if the man behind these striking images remains a little too elusive throughout.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Dalton
    The Dance of Reality is a rich pageant of nostalgic narcissism laced with New Age mysticism and fortune-cookie wisdom.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Dalton
    The premise of this Hungarian/German/Swedish co-production is solid, even if the execution feels a little slack and the running time too long.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Dalton
    The pace is gently hypnotic and the topic fitfully interesting, but the format will test the patience of all but serious art-cinema fans with its narrow focus and chilly film-school minimalism.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Dalton
    The film relies on high production values and sense-battering shock tactics to make up for wooden performances and an illogical, silly script. As an exercise in retro pastiche, it impresses. But as a postmodern genre reinvention, it fails to deliver.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Dalton
    With its splashy paintbox palette and jaunty pop soundtrack, All Cheerleaders Die just about hangs together as a cheerfully goofy romp.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Dalton
    Ahluwalia has striven for a very self-consciously arty aesthetic here, more Gus Van Sant than Michael Mann. This is a commendably bold way to approach material that might otherwise have drifted into routine lowlife crime-thriller territory, but it also drains a rich story of narrative momentum and emotional punch.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Dalton
    Heli is undoubtedly made with serious intent, but it is also relentlessly depressing and curiously uninvolving.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Dalton
    Omirbaev fails to invest either the murder plot or its political subtext with much suspense or conviction.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Dalton
    Halfway between a guilty pleasure and a missed opportunity, it makes the crucial mistake of treating curious viewers like deferential subjects, demanding far more sympathy than it deserves.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Dalton
    The film’s facile message of cross-cultural unity owes more to fairy tale than reality, but the action is slick and the story gripping.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Dalton
    The real problem here is not the shameless blurring of fact and fiction, but how unforgivably dull it all seems.