Stephen Holden

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For 2,185 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephen Holden's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 American Psycho
Lowest review score: 0 Hearts in Atlantis
Score distribution:
2185 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    This is the sort of gallows humor that Hitchcock relished drawing out in cruelly amusing cat-and-mouse games, not to be taken too seriously. The same is true of Married Life. The murder plot is not to be taken any more literally than the lethal games of “Mr. and Mrs. Smith.”
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    At its most provocative, Severe Clear pungently evokes a heroic Marine Corps mystique.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It's all very beautiful, not to mentioned high-minded. But the loftiness comes at a sacrifice.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Brokedown Palace is good enough so that you wish it were better.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    This intelligent, well-acted movie is not helped by the fact that its story in some ways parallels that of "Stigmata," the trashy supernatural spookfest that flared briefly at the box office earlier this year.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As blunt as it is in depicting child abuse, El Bola is a movie steeped in an ambiguity that lends its conflicts a symbolic resonance.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    If Race is a standard inspirational biopic that exalts the legend of an athletic hero, at least it doesn’t soft-pedal the racism that Owens encountered at every turn.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Puss has his charms, but he is not as memorable a character as Shrek or Shrek's mouthy sidekick, Donkey. Consequently the story, which involves a quest for magic beans and golden eggs, feels improvised and diffuse.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    This is a film that wears a smile button on its sleeve along with its happy heart. It believes that most people are absolutely wonderful, and it is well enough made so that a dusting of that dogged optimism is bound to rub off on you.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The nuanced performances of Ms. Smulders and Ms. Bean are flawless. Yet the movie’s calm levelheadedness is a subtle detriment. Everything is a little too easy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    By discarding most of the theological debate, the movie is no longer a passion play but a gritty and despairing noir. That's good enough for me.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A perfectly silly movie for a silly season that in recent years has forgotten how to be this silly. Directed by Angela Robinson, this latest installment in the movie-television franchise about a tiny car named Herbie with a will of its own and the temperament of a rambunctious 7-year-old knows exactly what it is and what it isn't.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Ms. MacLaine and Mr. Plummer make an especially compatible match, because his understated portrayal of a despairing misanthrope reins in her scenery-chewing exhibitionism.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It takes an actor with the finesse of Tom Hanks to turn a story of confusion, perplexity, frustration and panic into an agreeably uncomfortable comedy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    For all its flaws, the movie, filmed with nonprofessional actors, is steadily gripping.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    "Miramax porn." The term refers to manipulative tearjerkers like Dear Frankie whose sensitive performances, along with a light dusting of grit, allow them to be marketed as art films. This one is clever enough to fool a lot of people.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie, adapted by Terry McMillan from her semi-autobiographical novel, is pointedly boundary-breaking in its positive portrayal of a May-September relationship between a younger man and an older woman.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    For all its melodrama To Die Like a Man is a not a tearjerker. Its gaze into the void is as unblinking as that of the H.I.V.-positive 60-year-old hustler in Jacques Nolot's even more hard-headed film, "Before I Forget."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    For its first two-thirds, the film, written and directed by Thomas Cailley, seems to be groundbreaking. Then it slides into comforting familiarity.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A smart seriocomic playlet with some emotionally harsh moments, although it refrains from plumbing its subject in agonizing depth.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Hynes, who wrote the screenplay, seems well aware of the challenge of breathing fresh life into a familiar formula. Much of the dialogue is so quirky it sounds overheard instead of scripted. The performances are correspondingly spontaneous.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The screenplay ultimately bears out Alceste’s observations about treachery, selfishness and deceit, but with such charm and zest that their sting tickles more than it hurts.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    To realize that you may have the world while still feeling as if you have nothing is to experience a closer encounter with the void than most of us are likely to have.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    If Liberty Heights is much too soft at its center, it still offers a deeper immersion in that old '50s feeling than any other Hollywood film in recent memory.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Fits squarely into a Gallic tradition of wistful, worldly-wise comedies that reflect on the weakness of the flesh.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It is an appealing, gently comedic prologue to a love story.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    If Sweet Home Alabama, directed by Andy Tennant from a screenplay by C. Jay Cox, has the ingredients for a classic screwball comedy, the movie is in such a rush to entertain that it barely connects the dots of its story. But it still has its effectively goofy comic moments.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Stuck, while not strictly a horror film, is steeped in gore and carries a seam of mocking gallows humor as relentless as that of "Sweeney Todd."
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It all looks easy when it's carried off this smoothly. But as any number of stilted duds can attest, applying a Philip Barry or Woody Allen sensibility to 21st-century New Yorkers in their 30s is as delicate a craft as diamond cutting.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    For all the grimness and desperation on view in Mango Yellow, the characters emerge as robust, full-dimensional people in touch with their explosive feelings.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    These episodes, some staged as surreal dream sequences, inject this otherwise prosaic-looking movie with a visual pizazz that makes Sleepwalk With Me more than just a glorified stand-up act.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Monologues delivered by assorted unidentified losers in love who relate their unhappy stories to an unseen listener lend Heartbeats the semblance of a structure. But beyond that, the movie is a gush of gorgeous images and music.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As thorough an examination of the sport as you could hope to squeeze into 90 taut, well-organized minutes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The performances are so crackling that you can imagine Ms. Salazar and Mr. Pally, given richer material, becoming a slapstick comedy team: the spitfire and the nerd.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The strongest tales embrace a strain of barnyard humor that is matched by the robust performances of actors who convey an earthy jocularity. The movie doesn't shy away from comparing these hardy, weather-beaten rustics to their livestock.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie ultimately belongs to Mr. Dorff, whose villain is as frightening as any human reptile to have slithered onto the screen in quite some time.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    This gentle comedy, the first feature directed by Rob Meyer, is an eye opener for anyone who takes the everyday natural world for granted. It is also a quiet brief for the cultivation of intellectual curiosity and scientific exploration at an age when hormones rule so much behavior.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Our turbulent political climate is so clogged with the instant hysteria demanded by the chattering class to keep its voice in shouting condition that a sedate documentary examining the long-term weather patterns is a welcome respite from the noise.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A compulsively watchable but repugnant portrait of a selfish eccentric born to privilege.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The close-ups of faces convey reams of inchoate emotion and enhance the stumbling poetry mouthed by characters whose urge to connect conflicts with their innate sense of caution.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Uplifting, witty.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The film could be described as Exhibit A in a study of media celebrity and collective forgetfulness in the age of information overload.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie is unusual for its absence of gossip. Instead it offers hardheaded commentary about the rigors of a dancer’s life and how everyone who chooses a dance career is aware of its brevity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie, adapted from a novel by Carl Sagan, presents one long chain of teasingly open-ended questions about reason versus faith and technology versus religion, and ends up tentatively embracing mysticism over rationality.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Fast, light, frequently funny comedy.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    With its strained, quasi-poetic language that fitfully tries to soar, The Loss of a Teardrop Diamond is a significant, though less than monumental feat of reclamation.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    In the endearing but somewhat scatterbrained British film Nanny McPhee, Emma Thompson creates an indelible character reminiscent of Mary Poppins as conceived by the author P. L. Travers and the illustrator Mary Shepard.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Stylistically Ushpizin belongs to a classic tradition of raucous Yiddish comedy that is easy to enjoy if taken lightly. At the same time, it sustains a double vision of ultra-Orthodox life.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    In Ms. Irving's affectionate film, Mr. Bittner is more of a sage than a deadbeat.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    When they discover they've been made fools of, they accept this performance event with surprising equanimity. There is a lot of grumbling but no riot. They get the joke.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    What fortifies Shrek Forever After are its brilliantly realized principal characters, who nearly a decade after the first “Shrek” film remain as vital and engaging fusions of image, personality and voice as any characters in the history of animation.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    When it comes to actual historical details, Farewell crams too many notions into expositional blips of dialogue. And the scenes of conferences in the corridors of power, whether in Moscow, Paris or Washington, are strained and abrupt.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    In painting an unabashedly romantic picture of a nation whose songs spring directly from the lives of the people, the movie exalts the Marxian dream of honest working folk, with little to show for their labor, living harmoniously, joined in song.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The film offers a concise history of hijras, who used to officiate at births, weddings and other religious rituals.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Their eloquent monologues, interspersed with vicious verbal skirmishes, are artfully constructed, occasionally poetic expressions of pain, delivered in well-formed sentences that suggest the movie might have originated as a two-person stage drama.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Ms. Bonham Carter's hearty performance makes Mrs. Potter almost lovable. You may laugh at her garishness, but you applaud her pluck and stamina.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The Boys of Baraka is so rich that you wish there were more of it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Sebastián Silva is extremely perceptive about body language, and the characters’ physical presences are as revealing as their words. The performances give you an almost uncomfortable sense of proximity.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Its scrupulous, even-toned gentleness makes " The Butterfly suitable for children, while its clear-eyed intelligence and refusal to condescend should make it appealing to adults.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It uses a terrific score of bluegrass and old-timey songs, many of them written by Nick Hans, to underscore the connection and to evoke a fundamental American spirit epitomized by traveling musicians with banjos, fiddles and guitars.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Bounce may be far from a great film, but its pleasures are consistent enough to remind you of how few movies nowadays come anywhere close to matching it in intelligence and emotional balance.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Because Kurt Markus's Super 8 camera is the cinematic equivalent of a single microphone, the film's look matches the scratchy quality of its ancient (by rock 'n' roll standards) sound. The crudeness brings out the elemental quality of music that digs deeply into the soil of working-class American life in songs that express the defiance, despair and nobility of people who refuse to go down without a fight.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Loses some its bearings once it turns into a caper movie. The movie hardly bothers to explain the mechanics of the jailbreak or of the robberies themselves, which take place in a flurry of disguises and stickups that has a Keystone Kops flavor.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Such a well-acted, literate adaptation of Karen Joy Fowler’s 2004 best seller that your impulse is to forgive it for being the formulaic, feel-good chick flick that it is.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie might as well have been called "An Immersion in Tibetan Buddhism." With minimal explanation, it puts you right in the center.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Smoothly incorporates archival material, including scenes of Mr. Zinn's public appearances, interviews with Daniel Ellsberg, Noam Chomsky, Daniel Berrigan and Alice Walker (his student at Spelman). Matt Damon also reads well-chosen excerpts from Mr. Zinn's writing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Nastily amusing
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The best way to enjoy The Kings of Summer is to view it as a likable comic fantasy dreamed up by filmmakers (Chris Galletta wrote the screenplay) who are close enough to adolescence to infuse their ramshackle story with a youthful, carefree whimsy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    How light is this movie? So buoyant that even an air raid warning, signaling that this whole world is about to crumble under the blitz, can’t dampen its giddy spirits.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Anyone who attended Broadway shows in the days when ticket prices were reasonable and the actors and singers performed without amplification will feel a rush of nostalgia as these troupers offer what amounts to a breezy compilation of after-dinner remarks.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Doesn't aspire to be more than a broad, sloppy, old-fashioned sitcom with a sexy gimmick. But it is quite funny.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Crammed with enough melodrama to fill several soap operas.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A political thriller based on fact that hammers every button on the emotional console.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It is a voluptuous, hot-blooded portrait of a social outcast, a black, homosexual criminal who in acting out his gaudiest Hollywood dreams, transcendently reinvented himself.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The first feature written and directed by Martin Koolhoven. It reveals him as a skillful manipulator of disturbing visual images (much of the film is washed in inky blue) and a screenwriter adept at sustaining a mood of impending doom.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It is hard to imagine that any other actress could muster the stubborn ferocity that Isabelle Huppert brings to the role of Maud.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    In Pierrepoint:The Last Hangman Timothy Spall sinks his teeth into one of the juiciest roles of his career.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Bluntly, poignantly believable.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Moment by moment, it all adds up. The scenes of the family huddling and hugging, greeting and parting, and reaffirming primal bonds are quietly moving.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It is a career-defining performance that could catapult the 37-year-old actor beyond bland romantic leads and into the kinds of juicy anti-heroic parts once gobbled up by Mr. Hoffman and Robert De Niro.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Even though the plot defies credibility at several points, Out in the Dark is gripping.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Sustains a mood of aimless adolescent angst, and its vision of the road is uncompromisingly bleak.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    On its own good-natured terms, Selena' is both pleasant to watch and instructive in familiarizing a movie audience with the Texan-Mexican borderland music known as Tejano.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Holofcener's smart, acidic comedy Lovely and Amazing zeroes in on contemporary narcissism and its fallout with a relentless, needling accuracy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A modest, quietly touching portrait of an older woman radiantly embodied by Blythe Danner.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Despite its contemporary touches Around the World in 80 Days is a satisfying slice of old-fashioned storybook entertainment.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    For all the potentially dangerous subjects it glosses, above all the tangled legacies of the Holocaust and the Algerian war, The Names of Love dances away from any uncomfortable provocation. Even when sticking out its tongue, it is finally just an airy comedy riding on one cheeky, incandescent performance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Songcatcher is a sweet, lyrical ode to rural America in the early 1900's.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A respectful portrait of General Dallaire, now retired, who comes across as a thoughtful, resolute but profoundly shaken man, more philosopher than warrior.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Dorff’s hot-wired portrayal of a prisoner under physical and psychic siege gives Felon its emotional through line as Wade’s attitude metamorphoses from stunned disbelief, to terror, to despair, to fury and finally to hope.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Decoding Annie Parker is considerably better than the kind of disease-of-the-week fare that used to be a television cliché.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    What makes Frequency work despite is shamelessness is the surreal aura that imbues almost every scene with a sense of heightened feeling.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A likable rites-of-passage memory piece doused in period nostalgia, including the prominent use of vintage Movietone newsreels to mark the events of World War II.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Like "Twelve and Holding," another film from last year's New Directors series, Wild Tigers achingly sympathizes with the desperate lengths an obsessed adolescent will go to in pursuit of love. As you watch the movie, you pray that, in the language of "Tea and Sympathy," the future teachers of Logan's life lessons will "be kind."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Under its drab contemporary trappings, the movie, is really a Jane Austen-like moral parable in which goodness is rewarded and selfishness punished.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A movie that knows how to pace its audience. Watching it is like going for a long and satisfying jog.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Grimly austere barely begins to describe the atmosphere of dread that seeps through Fear X like a toxic mist.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    May be a comedy, but its images of physical frailty are inescapably unsettling. As the camera fixates on frail, spotted trembling hands unsteadily reaching out, it is impossible not to imagine a future in which those hands could be yours.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Nobody does adultery in movies with more style and zest than the French, especially when the mode is frivolous. And anyone who watches Happily Ever After can identify with the grass-is-always-greener daydreams that haunt its characters.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The film's flamboyant portrayals of characters you love to hate have a malicious comic edge. If ever there were a movie to gladden the hearts of misanthropes, this is it.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    UHF
    The movie is forever digressing so that Mr. Yankovic can offer media spoofs that have only the most tangential relation to the story. [22 Jul 1989, p.1.15]
    • The New York Times
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The Iranian director Majid Majidi’s sad, soulful film The Willow Tree is his second movie to explore blindness and sight on multiple levels.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    I am ashamed to admit that this empty-headed, preposterous, possibly evil mélange of gunplay and high-speed car chases on Parisian boulevards is a feel-good movie that produces a buzz.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Paints an alluring picture of a pan-European cosmopolitan culture whose characters hopscotch from one country to another with hardly a second thought in a lighthearted floating party.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Often feels like two movies loosely sewn together. By far the most compelling of the two is its portrait of Ms. Boyd, a woman who for all her quirks and self-dramatizing flourishes, emerges as a noble spirit on the side of the angels.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As spare as the juvenile institution in which much of it was filmed. As you watch it, you wish the film would fill in more of each girl's background.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Smoothly balancing comedy and pathos, it infuses the fantasy with enough credibility to make you care about these people and wish them merrily on their way.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A conventional, rather shallow up-by-your-bootstraps drama, but with a difference.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Best enjoyed as a lavish period travelogue whose story is dwarfed by its panoramic overview.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Small Time is agreeably sentimental meat-and-potatoes fare with strong dashes of humor, executed with a sincerity that’s hard to resist.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    If Mr. Hellman's movie only partly fulfills its promise as a gripping neo-noir mystery, his stylistic hallmarks lend it a singularly haunting atmosphere.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A finely acted expressionistic critique of the suburban baby culture and its joys, fears and fetishes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As a cautionary tale Lou Reed’s Berlin is an 85-minute public-service announcement that preaches "Just say no." The force of the music, however, lends this tawdry melodrama a tragic stature.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Lipsky’s screenplay, a messy collection of fragments arranged chronologically, adds up to one of the most intimate screen portraits of a relationship ever attempted.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    At the very least, Moog should persuade you that the history of music over the last century is as much a story of technology and sound as a family tree of stylistic influences. It's a very useful reminder.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The carnage, although explicit and frequent, is not grotesquely overdone. But except for Mr. Moura's Nascimento, the movie doesn't have the same richness of characters. Psychologically he is the whole show; the rest are stereotypes.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Little more than a vignette elongated into a feature-length movie. Moody and slow moving, it depends on the truthfulness of its performances to carry it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    If At Any Price overstates its points, they are still worth making. And the hot-wired performances by Mr. Quaid and Mr. Efron drive them home in a movie that sticks to your ribs and stays in your head.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As Sahara careens between swashbuckling silliness and semi-serious comment, it builds up reserves of energy and good will that pay off when it bursts into its final sprint, a rootin'-tootin' 21-gun finale as satisfying as it is preposterous.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Washington leans into an otherwise schlocky movie and slams it out of the ballpark.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Winter in Wartime turns into a moderately gripping thriller with predictable plot twists and reversals.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie is loaded with heart and the feel for local color and period detail that can only come out of a personal reminiscence.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Macy, a master at playing sticks of human dynamite in mild-mannered camouflage, gives the nerviest screen performance of his career.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Xenia has been called a farce. But it is much more than that. Both the story and the performances are packed with raw emotion.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Because it is a film, American Radical can only begin to sketch the complicated historical and political debates that engage Mr. Finkelstein and his detractors, but it allows both sides to make their cases.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    In its demystification of these youthful slum dwellers, the film makes their embrace of terrorism frighteningly comprehensible. Because it follows its main characters over 10 years, from childhood into adulthood, it gives their fates a sense of tragic inevitability
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    In the enchanted limbo between waking and sleeping, Zathura feels both real and unreal, like a dream you could shake off at any moment.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Exhibits a cheeky effervescence and spunk.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Romantics Anonymous might vaporize if the director and the actors didn't have such easy command over the tone of this singularly Gallic fairy tale. If you added a dozen songs and brought it to the stage it would be completely at home.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    An unpretentious, sociologically pointed slice of life.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    This likable, humane movie is not an attempt to recreate the epochal Woodstock Music and Art Fair captured in Michael Wadleigh’s documentary “Woodstock.” It is essentially a small, intimate film into which is fitted a peripheral view of the landmark event.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It is all either blood-chilling or hilarious. For those who celebrate Burroughs as one of the darkest and greatest of all comic artists, he is an extreme social satirist of Swiftian stature, whose quasi-pornographic images offer a stark, ghastly/funny photonegative image of the American body politic.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A languorously muted, occasionally magnificent film.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    What begins as a blushing, priapic opera buffa about coming of age turns into a verismo shocker, before softening into something mellower.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie is best appreciated as a collection of whimsical toys drawn from a fantasy grab bag that encompasses everything from Grimm's fairy tales to "Star Wars."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Greg Whiteley's small, tender documentary portrait New York Doll looks at life after rock 'n' roll as experienced by Arthur (Killer) Kane, the original bassist for the legendary glam-punk band the New York Dolls.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    In its zeal to bring recognition to an underappreciated genre, it has an agenda similar to that of last year's revelatory documentary "Standing in the Shadows of Motown."
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Jacobs and Mr. Grodsky have an extraordinary ear for the rhythms and nuances of everyday speech, as voices overlap, conversations take random directions, and casual remarks carry loaded subtexts.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    If repetition has stripped Iran's post-revolutionary cinema of some of its modish luster, The Deserted Station is still a valuable addition to a literature whose characteristics are now internationally well-established.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    If it isn't easy being any of the troubled people wandering through the film, Loggerheads makes it easy not only to believe in them, but to care about them as well.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Sleeping Dogs Lie doesn't pretend to be more than it is: a blunt, provocative comedy sketch whose visual look is almost as bare as that of an episode of the underappreciated Home Box Office series "Lucky Louie." The acting, especially by Ms. Hamilton, is better than serviceable.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Cusack’s sardonic, understated portrayal of Rat, who is not quite what he says he is, grounds the movie in a wistfully cynical realism.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Almost every frame of this modest gem of a movie, directed by Carlos Sorin from a screenplay by Pablo Solarz, conveys the emptiness of the environment in which three interwoven vignettes unfold.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Exhibition is an exquisitely photographed film that requires unusually close attention for it to reveal itself.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie's steadily elegiac tone precludes it from creating a more lively, idiosyncratic portrait of a man who, by many accounts, was a wonderful raconteur whose gift of gab was complemented by a rollicking sense of humor.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Does an almost dismayingly good job of conveying its characters' grim, bare-bones existence and the stultifying sexual and religious taboos that the lovers flout.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    And as you watch her (Moreau) sink into this semiautobiographical role (she was herself a touring performer in the 1980's), the character emerges as a deep, multilayered woman: kind, gentle and happily partaking of life's simple pleasures much of the time, but when necessary, as tough as her stage character through whom she relishes expressing her residual anger at life's hardships and disappointments.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Ms. Binoche’s portrayal of Camille is one of the most wrenching performances she has given.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As a piece of storytelling, A Wolf at the Door may be a tawdry little shocker. But on a visceral level, it is a knife to the gut.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie's extensive martial arts sequences, in which combatants bounce off each other doing triple handsprings, suggest a slightly more earthbound version of the aerial ballets in Hong Kong action-adventure films.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Imagine a cut-rate "Titanic" stripped of romance and historical resonance and fused with "Jaws," shorn of mythic symbolism and without complex characters, and you have the essence of this live-action horror comic.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Welcome to Leith wisely resists the kind of gimmickry that might have resulted in a stylistic hybrid of “The Blair Witch Project” or “Invasion of the Body Snatchers.”
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A swaggering journey into hell that conveys a chortling amusement at its own apocalyptic imagination.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    May be pure hokum, but at least it knows how to spin a yarn.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Funny? Yes. Revealing? No. By and large, the movie is content to offer amusing caricatures and leave it at that.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie, written and directed by Vidi Bilu and Dalia Hager, is really a study of people coping with excruciating boredom and the absurd aspects of military life.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A paint-by-numbers story that offers no surprises and a hero and villain etched in white and black with few shades of gray.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Yes, it's all terribly hokey. But once you accept the premise as a conceit that allows the director, Jean-Jacques Annaud, to offer an intimate, utopian vision of the animal kingdom, Two Brothers succeeds as an inspirational pastorale and passionate moral brief for animal rights and preservation.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Man From Reno fascinates. It invites you to go back, decipher its clues and discern a grand design, if there is one.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Sloppy but smart-enough-to-make-you-squirm comedy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Until it fizzles in an anticlimactic train crash, it is extremely entertaining.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Vision offers a hard-headed view of 12th-century religiosity in which church politics and money conflict with the characters' asceticism. It portrays Hildegard as a passionate humanitarian and a lover of nature.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    For the second film, Babak Najafi has succeeded Daniel Espinosa as director. The structure here is more mechanical, and the ambience scruffier, as the complicated story shifts from one disreputable lowlife to another.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Far from the first movie in which a fearless woman coaxes the inner tiger crouched inside a mild-mannered milquetoast to spring into action, but it is one of the most charming.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Ms. Madsen, radiant and tousled, without a trace of narcissism, conveys maternal devotion, undaunted courage and a serene sensuality. Real, if idealized, grown-ups: We haven't seen them much in the movies lately, but here they are.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    3
    In this quintessentially Germanic film, Berlin - where they live, work, and create and voraciously consume culture - is as much a character as any person. The collective sensibility on display is determinedly forward looking; you might even say avant-garde.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Ms. Hamilton’s straightforward documentary skillfully interweaves reminiscences by members of the group with re-enactments of the burglary.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Endearing, very funny and utterly unpretentious.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie's biggest disappointment is the vague, unfocused performance of Ms. Ricci, an actress known for taking risky, unsympathetic roles. Here she seems somewhat intimidated by her character.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Next Stop Wonderland isn't really much more than a beautifully acted, finely edited sitcom, but it creates and sustains an intelligent, seriocomic mood better than any recent film about the urban single life.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Enough films about human trafficking have been made in recent years that the outlines of Eden should be painfully familiar. But that familiarity doesn’t cushion this movie’s excruciating vision.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A Monster With a Thousand Heads will make your blood boil.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    This bright, entertaining movie focuses on Curtis, but it is also a portrait of a scene, whose survivors look back with a mixture of pride and a screwball sense of mischief.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    7 Minutes knows exactly what it is: a directorial calling card to the Quentin Tarantino school of blood-bath cinema.... This film is a nasty piece of work.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As it seesaws between Greta’s conscious and unconscious minds, the movie begins to feel like a waking dream.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Just like its main character, this smart, slyly witty movie with few laughs undersells itself.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    In a year overcrowded with wonderful performances by lead actors, Mr. Murphy's immensely appealing turn ranks among the strongest.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A streamlined, adrenalized thriller that is not as deep as it would like to appear, treads a retrospective political tightrope.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Dragon 2 is considerably darker and more self-aware than its forerunner. Both films are speedier than the average animated blockbuster. In places, Dragon 2 is almost too fast to keep up with, and, in other places, it’s a little too dark, at least in 3-D.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It would be shortsighted to dismiss this deeply felt, musically savvy film, set in a refined cultural precinct of Manhattan, as sudsy melodrama.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It conveys plenty of wonder while mostly avoiding any saccharine preachiness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As the movie’s resident live wire, Mr. Johnson, obviously having the time of his life, is a hoot, and the feisty camaraderie among these three men gives Cold in July a euphoric goofiness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    On one viewing, at least, it is a typically impenetrable Maddin film: zany one minute, pompous the next. Ardent Maddin admirers, of whom I am not one, might discern a grand design of what often feels like a post-Freudian horror comedy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The scruffy, outspoken train-hoppers in Sarah George's exhilarating documentary, Catching Out, are a sure sign that the pioneer spirit still flickers in pockets of TV-wired America.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The franchise, which had begun to run out of steam in Part 2, has been given a shot of adrenaline with the replacement of the Wayans Brothers as the prime creative forces by Hollywood's original spoof-meister, David Zucker.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The most moving aspect of Collateral Damages is the firefighters' sense of brotherhood and duty to their jobs. It is expressed matter-of-factly, without a shred of smugness or superiority, almost with embarrassment.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Scary enough to make the faint of heart decide never to venture into the woods or to lie on the grass again without protective covering.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Inspiring enough to make you wish that the filmmakers had reined in their sentimental excesses.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Handsomely photographed and inspirational, but not cloyingly so, it is the rare contemporary documentary that doesn't leave a residue of cynicism and outrage.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Instead of turning soft and squishy, this examination of karma gets tougher as it goes along. Its refusal to settle into a cozy niche may be commercially disastrous, but I take it as a sign of integrity.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    To warm to Manderlay, the chilly second installment of Lars von Trier's not-yet-finished three-part Brechtian allegory examining United States history, you must be willing to tolerate the derision and moral arrogance of a snide European intellectual thumbing his nose at American barbarism.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Except for a subplot about a missing cat that suggests that Fred may be considerably dottier than he appears, the movie gets almost everything right about the uncomfortable moment when grown children are forced to be their parents' parents.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A lightweight comedy that has more than enough laughs to justify its silly, scatterbrained premise.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The enjoyable, lightweight Troubadours is a musical scrapbook that throws together a bit of this and a bit of that.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    An upbeat meat-and-potatoes movie.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Spike Lee has grabbed a tiger by the tail in his scabrously risky new comedy, Bamboozled. The wonder is how long he succeeds in hanging on.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As for the man who invented it all, he remains a mystery in the film, living out his days in sybaritic bliss.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Hal Holbrook strips the stereotype of the grumpy old man of sentimental shtick and cutesy old-codger mannerisms.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Upbeat.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Originally released seven years ago on home video, is only now surfacing as a theatrical release. Although it's no classic, it's a cut or two smarter than the average Hollywood comedy. At its best, it plays like a less acerbic, less Jewish triple episode of "Curb Your Enthusiasm." (review of re-release)
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Melancholy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A meditation on the scale of a catastrophe so enormous that all the assembled resources seem paltry and inadequate.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The scenes between the young lovers confronting adult authority have the same seething tension and lurking hysteria that the young Warren Beatty and Natalie Wood brought more than 40 years ago to their roles in "Splendor in the Grass."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Too fixated on 1939 for its own good. Its passionate immersion in a past that only dimly resonates with younger audiences may be a badge of its integrity, but that immersion trumps its vision of the future and leaves us in a land of nostalgia.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Black Souls is an ominous, well-acted portrait of an ingrown feudal society of violence, retaliation and deadly machismo.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    These stylized images by the Australian artist Peter Coad create an aesthetic distance from the cruelty, lending the atrocities the stature of events in a historical mural that freezes the past into an eternal present.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Byrne’s film is a sober, evenhanded recapitulation of Sands’s imprisonment and death that places him in a historical context.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Maintains a tone that remains as light and easygoing as the Australians living in the area.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Reminds you that marital discord knows no geographic boundaries.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The lesson of this story: if enough money is involved, greed trumps morality.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Presents itself as an anguished brief against capital punishment, especially the execution of people who are legally insane...But the timing of its release smacks of the very exploitation that Mr. Bloomfield condemns.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    At heart a Frank Capra-style social fable for the '90s.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Wang and his screenwriting collaborator, Lu Wei (“Farewell My Concubine”), portray a world that, apart from its hardship, is thoroughly recognizable in its human complexity. Its characters are motivated by the same needs for companionship and material well-being and the same demons — greed, lust, jealousy and despair -- that drive everybody.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie isn't entirely despairing. Near the end, it suggests that contemporary Tunisian women with enough fighting spirit can achieve a measure of autonomy, although the personal cost may be bitter. And the movie's sun-drenched views of life on the southern Tunisian island of Jerba are beautiful.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Even if it doesn't add up to more than a fitfully amusing collection of comic sketches, Color Me Kubrick is a platform for John Malkovich to burst into lurid purple flame.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    If the Yes Men’s antics have a lot in common with the stunts of Sacha Baron Cohen and Michael Moore, they are executed more in the spirit of dry amusement than as showboating, gotcha moments.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    In exalting the very worst of humanity, Bones displays a special glee and an unusual density of scary imagery.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Jesus Camp doesn't pretend to be a comprehensive survey of the charismatic-evangelical phenomenon. It offers no history or sociology and only scattered statistics about its growth. It analyzes the political agenda only glancingly, centering on abortion but not on homosexuality or other items.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Gigantic has the informal tone and structure of an illustrated scrapbook with excerpts from concert and television performances interwoven with lighthearted testimonials by friends, supporters, collaborators and admirers and augmented by witty animated segments.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    This well-acted film captures a generational and occupational sliver of New York life that rings true.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Cézanne et Moi offers a pungent, demystifying portrait of the rowdy late-19th-century Parisian art world where famous painters and poets mingled and jostled for position at dinner parties and art openings filled with shoptalk, backbiting and intrigue.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Besides Ms. Linney’s excellent performance and Mr. Hopkins’s good one, the best things about the movie are its sensuous cinematography by Javier Aguirresarobe (“Talk to Her,” “Vicky Cristina Barcelona”) and a gorgeous soundtrack.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Beautiful Darling, James Rasin's touching documentary biography of Candy Darling, the transsexual Andy Warhol "superstar," is a sad, lyrical reflection on the foolish worship of movie stars.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Bomb the System, which rides on a subtle hip-hop soundtrack, might be described as soulful pulp; cult recognition awaits it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Sustains a lovely balance between enchantment and playfulness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Here, as in so many other documentaries about troubled musicians, the word genius is casually tossed around. But does every unstable, self-destructive artist defiantly living on the edge qualify for that description? In Van Zandt's case, maybe yes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Certainly not the first film to show how a crushing urban environment can make a sensible-sounding antidrug slogan like "just say no" seem like so much nonsense, but it's one of the strongest.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    An admiring portrait of the Silver Belles, a troupe of veteran Harlem tap dancers between the ages of 84 and 96, is a valuable historical document and a useful how-to movie about making the most of old age.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Beyond the arty trappings and flamboyant showmanship that are typical of Mr. Greenaway, 73, Eisenstein in Guanajuato is a brazen provocation.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Ms. Pineda and Ms. Troncoso give wonderfully natural performances in which they convey the impulsiveness and insecurity of adolescence. You are uncomfortably reminded of what it feels like to be 15.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Delicate, bittersweet comedy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Where most movies portraying sociopathic behavior make some attempt at psychological explanation, Butterfly Kiss offers no background to Eunice's craziness. As she throws herself furiously through a bleak highway landscape of anonymous gas stations and convenience stores, she appears to be a self-created avenging demon radiating a powerful but loopy charisma.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie may be a conventional story of police corruption, temptation and conflicting loyalties, but it never loses its smarts.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    You come at the story, such as it is, as a visitor from the outside world, picking up information as the movie goes along. This approach impedes comprehension, and at moments you may be tempted to sit back and not try to make the pieces fit. For those unwilling to make the effort, Songs My Brothers Taught Me has other rewards.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Like Mr. Soldini's last film, "Days and Clouds," a calm, very sad examination of the effects of a husband's sudden job loss on an affluent couple's relationship and social life, Come Undone is solidly grounded in mundane reality. If the movie tells an old story, its unvarnished realism lends it poignancy and depth.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    More acutely than any movie before, it gives cinematic expression to the hot-tempered, defiantly nihilistic ethos that ignites gangster rap.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    In Mr. Jordan’s portrayal of Jamie, this handsome talented musical theater performer (“Newsies”) goes for the jugular in taking down his character and making him insufferable.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie offers a revealing case study of the relationship between politics, celebrity and the media in today’s polarized social climate.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As a personality study Imelda is a devastating portrait of how power begets self-delusion. It must be said, however, that through it all Mrs. Marcos exudes considerable charm and even a flickering sense of humor.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    One of the most accomplished recent films about a non-European immigrant coming to the United States.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The Yes Men Are Revolting, their third film, has a personal poignancy that is missing in the forerunners, “The Yes Men” (2003) and “The Yes Men Fix the World” (2009).
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Max
    A historical fantasy connecting fact and wild supposition into a provocative work of fiction that poses ticklish questions about art and society.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The story has enough nasty twists and tantalizing clues for its ingenious mechanics to remain engaging.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The film's most weirdly beautiful moments are its excerpts from Bowery's collaborations with the Michael Clark Dance Company.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A good-natured screwball road film.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The screwball aging diva genre isn't the only formula guiding this stubbornly old-fashioned movie. Driving Lessons belongs to the silly feel-good mode of "The Full Monty," "Calendar Girls," "Billy Elliot," "Kinky Boots" and dozens of other celebrations of Britons defying convention to become "free," whatever that means.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A noirish thriller that revels in ominous visual moods, deepened by Cliff Martinez's spare, shivering guitar score, this heartland "Appointment in Samarra" is a mind-teaser that speaks the flat, evasive language of its seedy characters.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie’s observations of the wolf pack mentality of privileged teenage boys who view every conquest as proof of their prowess is casually devastating.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    This contemporary sex farce, directed by Jeff Pollack, has the attention span of a hyperactive child, but its bawdy sexual humor rarely flags.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A movie that rings emotionally true, despite structural contrivances and dim, washed-out color.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    If the title "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" didn’' already belong to Hunter S. Thompson, it would perfectly fit Peter Tolan's viciously funny satire, Finding Amanda.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Performing Shakespeare can save children's lives. That is the persuasive argument of Alex Rotaru's documentary Shakespeare High, an inspiring, if too short and overcrowded, examination of the competition among high schools at the 90th annual Drama Teachers Association of Southern California Shakespeare Festival.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie’s confident performances and its eye and ear for detail make The Good Guy a satisfying insider’s snapshot of a shark tank.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    At the end, Bear Cub does have a brush with sentimentality. But by then, its integrity and low-key truthfulness has been certified in a dozen different ways.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Watching it is like slowly leafing through a giant scrapbook whose contents include the individual stories of a large extended family.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A fake documentary that barely lets on that its fiction, this devilishly clever film tells the story of conjoined twins who create a minor sensation in Britain on the eve of punk rock.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Some of the pieces in its jigsaw puzzle are too fragmentary, and there's a sense of racing against time to fill in the blanks. Yet the movie's even-handed portrayal of two cultures uneasily transacting the most personal business resonates with truth.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Clive Owen conveys a sharp, cynical intelligence that rolls off the screen in waves whenever he widens his glittering blue eyes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Compellingly acted from top to bottom. As the raw passions of its hard-bitten characters seep into you, the songs hammer them even more deeply into your consciousness. The film's only flaw - a big one - is its brevity.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The film uses the situation to evoke a sense of the absurd, sometimes with dry, deadpan humor.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    On one level, Bluebird is a bitter slice of life about hardy, stoic New Englanders battling the elements and a crumbling regional economy. On another, it’s a poetic meditation on the human struggle to make sense of a cruel and indifferent universe.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As End of the Century reveals even more starkly than the recent Metallica documentary, "Some Kind of Monster," harmony among band members becomes harder to sustain as the years gather, youthful enthusiasm wanes, and personalities define themselves.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Even with its tepid lead performance, Criminal is a clever and diverting caper film. At least, it is as long as you don't think too hard about it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    What distinguishes Breathe In from countless similar movies about marital discontent and disruption is the restraint with which the story is handled, the subtlety of its performances and its almost perverse refusal to turn into a prurient, heavy-breathing examination of adultery and its consequences.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A toned-down cinematic equivalent of the music: fast and loud, but not too loud. The movie scrambles to cover so much territory that there is room only for musical shards and slivers; few complete songs are heard, and no signature anthems stand out.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It would be tempting to dismiss Nobody Walks as a trivial erotic divertissement, even more so because it doesn't apply the kind of symbolic gloss found in a '60s film of serial seduction, like Pasolini's "Teorema." Banal as its situation may be, it picks at every scab you may have left over from wounds suffered during the mating games of your youth.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A trashily entertaining reptilian version of ''Jaws'' set in the steaming heart of the Amazon rain forest.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Rebecca Miller’s fourth film is a wry, acutely observant drama.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Compelling, finely balanced immigration drama.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Off the Black is so much Mr. Nolte’s movie that it couldn’t exist without him. His character is the latest in a long line of Hemingway-esque ruins, marinated in beer and testosterone, who have become Mr. Nolte’s specialty.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Feels a like smooth, exciting whoosh down a ski slope.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Ultimately, Come Undone isn't a movie about homosexuality, depression or family dynamics. For a gay coming-out story, its sexual politics are extremely muted.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Despite being edited in a style that jarringly blurs the past and the present by switching from one to the other without preparation, Almost Brothers is strong stuff.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie's other master stroke is the artfully unhinged lead performance of Louisa Krause as the despicable King Kelly, a character who would have been ready-made for Tuesday Weld.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Make of it what you will: like its subject, Saint Misbehavin' is an unabashed love letter to the world that defies the cynicism of our age.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Brassed Off is shamelessly manipulative and sentimental, but in an agreeably familiar way.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The surest sign of the movie’s integrity is that it resists any temptation to build the story to a climactic debate.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Frustratingly sketchy partly because it is not finally a survival tale but a mystical evocation of the power of Inuit mythology, and how the passing down of ancient wisdom can sustain the human spirit in the direst circumstances. But the unanswered questions still nag.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Whether you like or loathe Mr. Dumont’s movies, his unsettling vision of humanity stripped of cultural finery feels profoundly truthful.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It may not go anywhere in particular, but it is as exciting as a trip through a well-equipped, scary fun house.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Funny Games observes the family's excruciating terror and suffering with the patient delight of a cat luxuriantly toying with a mouse that it is in the process of slowly killing. Posing as a morally challenging work of art, the movie is a really a sophisticated act of cinematic sadism. You go to it at your own risk.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Never disrespectful. It leaves you liking and even admiring the people of Massillon for their spunk and their passionate commitment to carrying on a hallowed tradition.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Dense, exhilarating.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Captures the vulnerability and aimlessness of its unfortunate characters with a heart-in-your-throat rawness that recalls some of the more poignant moments of Italian neo-realist cinema.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Tries to do too much in too little time. It would be a stronger film if it devoted more detailed attention to the plight of the returning veteran. As it stands, it is a scattershot antiwar polemic that doesn't bolster its arguments with any historical perspective or statistical evidence. No one from the government or the military is trotted out to give an opposing view. This is not to say that The Ground Truth, on its own terms, isn't devastating.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    War/Dance, in spite of its slickness, is an honorable, sometimes inspiring exploration of the primal healing power of music and dance in an African tribal culture.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The gentle, upbeat documentary Throw Down Your Heart chronicles the African pilgrimage of the American banjo virtuoso Béla Fleck in search of the origins of his chosen instrument.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Jessica Yu’s enthralling documentary exploration of people with obsessive needs for control and self-mastery.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The uninitiated viewer can admire it simply for the majesty of its visual poetry.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Adam Reid's smart, poignant trilogy of interwoven vignettes, manages the considerable feat of creating six fully human characters who are quirky enough to transcend the stereotypes found in a typical indie film.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As with the 70's films of Terrence Malick, one of Undertow's producers, the more intoxicated it becomes with rural desolation and fecundity, the more deeply in touch it puts you with its characters' souls.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Although Puzzle is a much smaller, less ambitious film without the ominous political subtext of Ms. Martel's masterwork, its story of a woman discovering her special gift and rejoicing in it has implications about sexual inequality in Argentina's middle class.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Dramatically skimpy, even though the movie stirs together themes of love, sex, death and war.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Superbly acted, without a trace of coyness and with considerable heat.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    What's really so appealing about the characters is their resemblance to everyday children. They're wildly energetic, competitive and (sometimes dangerously) impulsive. But they also learn from their mistakes, and their instincts are good. More power to them.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    What Darfur Now offers is a collective vision of actions, small and large, taken on many fronts, to end the crisis. The movie is a quiet, methodical call to action.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A smart, sardonic satire.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Pressure Cooker belongs to the honorable if overpopulated genre of inspirational films (both documentaries and features) dedicated to the proposition that one committed, passionate teacher can make all the difference in the lives of disadvantaged students.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    One of the most disquieting (and challenging) statistics is left for last: if Africa's share of world trade increased by only one percentage point, it would generate $70 billion a year, five times what the continent receives in aid. Who wouldn't want that?
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    An undeniably impressive visual spectacle that follows the sport of extreme skiing.

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