Stephen Holden

Select another critic »
For 2,186 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephen Holden's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Stand Clear of the Closing Doors
Lowest review score: 0 King's Ransom
Score distribution:
2186 movie reviews
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The movie looks and feels like a frantic, live-action psychedelic cartoon.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Reminds us that when it comes to comedy, it's all in the writing. Mr. Kalesniko's satirically barbed screenplay, whose spirit harks back to the comic heyday of Blake Edwards, stirs up an insistent verbal energy that rarely flags.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Would seem hokey if it didn't have powerful, extraordinary central performances and cinematography that lends the English landscape around Cornwall a mythical cast.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    So hopelessly cartoonish and wrongheaded in its details that there's not even a semblance of reality.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    As gamely as the movie tries to make sense of its title character, there remains a huge gap between the film's creepy, clean-cut Dahmer (Jeremy Renner) and fiendish acts that no amount of earnest textbook psychologizing can bridge.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A satire of contemporary sexual warfare that leaves you smiling but also stung.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Far from a future cult classic, it turns out to be smarter and more diabolical than you could have guessed at the beginning.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Softening that apocalyptic undercurrent is a counter-strain of quiet nobility.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    An uproariously dizzy satire...Hedaya has created the year's funniest film caricature.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    There is so much to admire in The Weight of Water, Kathryn Bigelow's churning screen adaptation of a novel by Anita Shreve, that when the movie finally collapses on itself late in the game, it leaves you in the frustrating position of having to pick up its scattered pieces and assemble them as best you can.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    You are left with the feeling that its excesses notwithstanding, it knows its chosen terrain.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    By far the grimmest of these nonnarrative, nonverbal cinematic tone poems with epic ambitions. Although none of the three could be described as cheery, Naqoyqatsi, whose title is the Hopi Indian term for war as a way of life, reeks of doomsday.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Avoids succumbing to the preachiness that is the bane of so many family films, and for a movie like this, that's no small feat.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    For all its untidiness, Washington Heights teems with life, and its star, Mr. Perez, has charisma to burn. The movie vividly depicts the interdependence and solidarity of people in working-class urban neighborhoods where residents really need one another.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Once the movie throws in a jolting, late-in-the-gameplot twist that could have been borrowed from "City of Angels," it never regains its balance.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    An ensemble piece developed from an improvisational workshop, the movie exudes a haunted melancholy that recalls such early Alan Rudolph films as "Choose Me" and "Welcome to L.A," and it includes several flashy performances.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Even more than Jerry Lewis, Robin Williams or Pee-wee Herman, Mr. Carrey, now 41 (pretty old for an overgrown kid), sustains a maniacal energy that explodes off the screen in blinding electrical zaps. Those jolts don't always feel pleasant.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Crackles dangerously to life whenever Constance (who narrates the film) is on the screen with her father Hank (Terry Kinney).
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    For all its energy and fine acting, Tycoon has a frustrating lack of narrative coherence.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The movie's biggest strength is a story that refuses to quit and almost makes sense within its own screwball logic.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    An amiably klutzy affair whose warm, fuzzy heart emits intermittent bleats from the sleeve of its gleaming spacesuit.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Rambling, occasionally very funny reflection on the meaning of family in contemporary Japan.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Mendelsohn's fusion of science fiction and Chekhovian melancholy finds a fresh perspective on a familiar theme.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A suds-filled political melodrama that bashes the Roman Catholic Church in Mexico with a contempt that verges on hysteria, could be accused of many things, but timidity is not one of them.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A peppy romantic trifle from France that rises above the mundane on the strength of its beautifully detailed lead performances.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A crude but stirring video documentary filmed over last year and this by Amos Poe, while Mr. Earle and his band were on tour.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    If the movie has loads of nerve, its ambitious fusion of cartoons and live-action comedy is only fitfully amusing.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Newell is master of the feel-good ensemble piece whose shallowness is partly masked by the expertise of a high-toned cast.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The material isn't organized in any formal way but works as a mosaic that has the feel of a jam session.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A 1950's movie magazine fantasy dressed up just enough to pass for contemporary.

Top Trailers