Stephen Holden
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For 1,958 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephen Holden's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Gosford Park
Lowest review score: 0 Mary
Score distribution:
1,958 movie reviews
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The movie's biggest strength is a story that refuses to quit and almost makes sense within its own screwball logic.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Transcendently dumb but very funny comedy.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Sadly, Mr. Smith has made a movie so false and blatantly icky that it's the film equivalent of making goo-goo noises and chucking a baby under the chin for 103 minutes. At the end, all you're left with is drool and a mountain of baby powder.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    9 Songs, for all its failed ambitions and its tinge of sexism, is lovely to watch.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Its narrative continuity is so sketchy and the screenplay so haphazard that the movie doesn’t add up to more than trash, seasoned with pretentious religiosity.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Wish I Was Here is so eager to please that you are never allowed to feel uncomfortable for more than a minute or two before a reassuringly stale joke rushes in to pat you on the head.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    As the movie jumps back and forth in time, it displays an impressive cut-and-paste agility, skillfully interweaving humor and drama without tipping over into farce or soap opera.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The lead performances of Home Room go a long way toward camouflaging the severe flaws of this exceedingly earnest movie.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Faithful to the outline of the novel but emotionally and spiritually anemic, it slides into the void between art and entertainment, where well-intended would-be screen epics often land with a thud.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Recovery time is recommended after seeing Gardens of the Night, a harrowing, obliquely told story of kidnapping and forced child prostitution that conjures a world entirely populated by predators and prey.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Well acted, but it doesn't enrich its metaphor beyond giving an old story a sour contemporary resonance.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    The story is a clever sitcomy contraption, the dialogue is pedestrian.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The sustained force of Mr. Dumont's vision of existence as a swirl of brute instincts may not be easy to absorb, but it marks him as a major filmmaker.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The other alumni, played by Malin Akerman, Adam Brody, Jeremy Strong and Rebecca Lawrence, are given such short shrift that they come across more as sarcastic commentators than as characters.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    More skin is shown in Spread than in most Hollywood movies. But despite twitches of insight into its characters and their world, Spread refuses go more than skin deep.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The core of the movie is a satirical political thriller that juxtaposes dual points of view that could be described in cinematic terms as "It's a Wonderful Life" versus "Chinatown." The digressions should have been pared away.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Until it plunges into gore, the movie remains above the typical splatter 'n' scream fest. These careless hedonists are convincing, and the ensemble acting feels believable; the orgy looks very real. But the realism turns to caricature once the panicked party monsters begin viciously turning on one another.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    The film has no idea of how to develop its one-joke premise. The tepid love scenes are as erotically charged as a home movie of a little girl hugging her Barbie doll, and the satire as cutting as the blunt edge of a plastic butter knife.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    In exalting the very worst of humanity, Bones displays a special glee and an unusual density of scary imagery.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Continually squanders its opportunities for hilarity.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    As this cautious, politically evenhanded movie grinds along like clockwork, the fuse that should spark an emotional explosion fizzles after some sporadic hisses and sputters.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Loses tension (and ultimately credibility) as it wanders through three possible endings before grinding to a halt.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The performances are so skillful that the actors almost carry it off. But as the shocks come thicker and faster, the credibility of The Intended, wears away.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Each thread of the plot is followed to its dangling, ragged conclusion in a movie that may be painful to watch but that maintains a chilly integrity.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Breezing along on gusts of stale air and perky inanities, Two Weeks Notice is a romantic comedy so vague and sadly undernourished that it makes one of Nora Ephron's low-cal strawberry sodas seem as tempting as a Philip Barry feast.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    It is surprisingly timely.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Gives you the delirious thrill of ripping off your enemy's head and watching the blood gush by providing a ringside seat.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Mighty Fine chugs along heartily until it abruptly stops on the edge of cliff, leaving you feeling shortchanged. It is a couple of crucial scenes away from feeling complete.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The acting, especially Ms. Moore’s, is solid. But her strong, sympathetic performance fails to transform The English Teacher into anything more than a sitcom devoid of laughs, except for a soupçon of literary humor. It is a movie at odds with itself.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Except for Williams, the sitcom-meets-sci-fi acting throughout the movie is strictly of television caliber.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    A dawdling affair that never finds its own rhythm. Early on, it gets lost in its own earnestness and never finds its way back.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Fails its stars in fundamental ways. Mr. Nicholson has played wealthy rogues before (most recently in “Something’s Gotta Give”), but this particular bon vivant is unsalvageably repellent.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The movie has holes galore. It has abrupt tonal shifts, an incoherent back story and abandoned subplots. It doesn’t even try for basic credibility. But buoyed by hot performances, it sustains a zapping electrical energy.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    I am ashamed to admit that this empty-headed, preposterous, possibly evil mélange of gunplay and high-speed car chases on Parisian boulevards is a feel-good movie that produces a buzz.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Pointless little kidnapping thriller.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Behind its transgressive affectations, The Foxy Merkins is a sweet, playful divertissement.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    In the opening images of Devil’s Knot, the camera sets a menacing, Hitchcockian mood by stealthily creeping into the woods where the murders took place. But the movie settles into being a police procedural with the tone of a superior episode of “Law & Order: SVU.”
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Mental wildly overplays the kookiness and quirk.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    What keeps the movie, directed by Michael Dowse, on a more or less even keel is its steady pacing and emotional kinship to John Hughes comedies like "Sixteen Candles" and "The Breakfast Club."
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Although this is potentially juicy stuff, it is as dry and tasteless as a shrunken piece of fruit left in the refrigerator far too long.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    It isn't saying much, but at least her (Carey) work here is more substantial than in the catastrophic "Glitter."
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The movie looks and feels like a frantic, live-action psychedelic cartoon.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The movie they have concocted has the feel of a visual sampler or an elaborate color swatch submitted for a design that remains largely unexecuted.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    The glum, episodic and unbelievable Arthur Newman is the film equivalent of a dysfunctional computer sloppily assembled from discarded parts of other machines.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Much of the film is a nearly wordless tone poem that sustains an intense emotional gravity and sexual tension through its mixture of music, beautiful outdoor cinematography and somber, silent acting.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The Last New Yorker would like to think of itself as a comic fairy tale, but Lenny’s pride and self-delusion are too pathetic to be amusing.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Ms. Barkin is almost unrecognizable as this bedraggled bundle of rage and disappointment. Exploding from deep within, her devastating performance hijacks the film.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A rom-com fairy tale so tepid and well behaved that watching it feels like being stuck in traffic as giddy joy-riders in the opposite lane break the speed limit. You have little choice but to cool your heels and pretend that the parched crabgrass in the median is a field of flowers.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    In the breezy, amoral heist comedy Mad Money, “Fun With Dick and Jane” meets “9 to 5” on the way to recession.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    All too soon, Machete Kills collapses into a deranged, directionless splatter comedy that exhausts its bag of tricks, many of them recycled from this grindhouse auteur’s 2010 spoof.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Except for Ms. Janney's monstrous mother and an Alzheimer's-afflicted grandmother (Polly Bergen), Struck by Lightning gives its characters no dimension.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Most of the modest pleasures are in the ways the men expertly play off one another and invest their shallow characters with more depth than any filmmaker could reasonably expect.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Propelled by astute, straight-faced performances, it succeeds in stirring up some maniacal laughs.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The movie's relentless comic excess is ultimately a little exhausting. But the longer the series endures, the more likely it is to achieve classic cult status.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Far from being a typical Hollywood desecration of a difficult play, it stays true to the work's quirky, renegade spirit.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    In this elongated, formula-ridden sitcom posing as a movie, the date-weary Manhattan singles exchanging acerbic banter suggest the tougher, far less intellectual offspring of Woody Allen characters drenched in a whiny Seinfeldian dyspepsia.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Whatever it intends, Jesus Henry Christ is not especially funny. There are witticisms galore in both the thematically recurrent imagery and the dialogue, but very few qualify as jokes, and any laughter is hard to come by. Willfully zany would be a more apt description.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Free Ride offers an unsettling vision of a demimonde whose inhabitants live with the reality that there may be no tomorrow.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    If the film's old-movie homages are affectionate, they're slavishly imitative and scattershot, and the story is so willfully daffy that not even the hint of a subtext asserts itself. The film rides on the dubious assumption that camp and infantilism are the same thing.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A swaggering journey into hell that conveys a chortling amusement at its own apocalyptic imagination.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A movie that knows much better than to try to make sense. It is essentially a strung-together series of gags, most of them thought up by Lloyd, an inveterate practical joker.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Stoned accomplishes the unlikely feat of making the golden years before medical science and the law caught up with rock culture look dull.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    An intermittently funny free-for-all that tries desperately to flesh out a television sketch into a feature-length movie.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As Sahara careens between swashbuckling silliness and semi-serious comment, it builds up reserves of energy and good will that pay off when it bursts into its final sprint, a rootin'-tootin' 21-gun finale as satisfying as it is preposterous.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Its view of the near future may be vaguely plausible and its performances persuasive, but its formulaic construction, internal inconsistencies and fuzzy ending undermine its integrity. It has nothing to say about the big issues -- manhood, war and friendship -- that hasn’t been explored with more depth and honesty in a hundred other movies.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Quickly curdles into a nasty variation of the one-last-score genre.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Although it only glosses the mechanics of local politics, it exudes an endearingly scruffy charm.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The movie, which imagines its principal characters as metaphorically ticking time bombs, never convincingly portrays their passions.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    An ensemble piece developed from an improvisational workshop, the movie exudes a haunted melancholy that recalls such early Alan Rudolph films as "Choose Me" and "Welcome to L.A," and it includes several flashy performances.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The closest sensory approximation of an acid trip ever achieved by a mainstream movie and the latest example of Mr. Gilliam's visual bravura.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    If it weren’t for the diligent performances of its stars, who inject some emotional depth into this bogus claptrap, Before I Go to Sleep would be an unwatchable, titter-inducing catastrophe.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Molly’s Theory of Relativity is an intentionally uncomfortable movie to watch. The fifth feature from Jeff Lipsky, this eccentric, often high-pitched family comedy might be described as a surreal, post-Freudian gabfest.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Better Living Through Chemistry never becomes a full-fledged film noir. It reads as an unabashedly positive infomercial for gorging on the apparently risk-free, liberating products of Big Pharma.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    For all the trials its characters endure, you might almost describe Ramchand Pakistani as a happy movie: too happy to be entirely believed.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The dialogue in the film, directed by Anne Renton from a screenplay by Claire V. Riley and Paula Goldberg, has the loud, mechanical clicketyclack of a 40-year-old episode of "All in the Family."
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The grittier side of Coming Up Roses, which Ms. Albright wrote with Christina Lazaridi, is unconvincing boilerplate grunge.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    What Horrible Bosses 2 lacks in nasty repartee, it tries to make up for in poorly staged comedy chases and break-ins. It is the Hollywood equivalent of a rambunctious little boy pointing to the toilet and squealing, “Mommy, look what I made!”
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    No amount of splenetic ranting by Brian Cox, a wonderful actor, when given the right role, can salvage The Good Heart from terminal mawkishness.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It is a career-defining performance that could catapult the 37-year-old actor beyond bland romantic leads and into the kinds of juicy anti-heroic parts once gobbled up by Mr. Hoffman and Robert De Niro.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Nightwatch spends so much time churning up eerie atmospheric effects that it doesn't have time to develop its preposterous story in which Martin finds himself accused of the murders.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    About halfway through, the wheeling and dealing becomes so elaborate and the villains so numerous that the only way to enjoy the movie is to let its preposterous story wash over as you sit back and take in the scenery.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    In its mixture of the quirky and the downbeat, Ceremony aspires to be a hybrid of Noah Baumbach's "Margot at the Wedding" and Wes Anderson's "Rushmore" but falls far short.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Its belly laughs leave you feeling liberated and not guilty; I repeat, not guilty.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    In Good, the anemic screen adaptation of C. P. Taylor's play about a respectable "good German" who passively acquiesces to Hitler's agenda, Viggo Mortensen, miscast and ineptly directed by Vicente Amorim, plays John Halder, a liberal, mild-mannered literature professor who becomes a Nazi.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    As Mr. Maher, in his feature directing debut, brings in surreal touches and puts on literary airs, the film’s grip loosens, and its vernacular turns increasingly wooden.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Reminds us that when it comes to comedy, it's all in the writing. Mr. Kalesniko's satirically barbed screenplay, whose spirit harks back to the comic heyday of Blake Edwards, stirs up an insistent verbal energy that rarely flags.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    For all the grimness and desperation on view in Mango Yellow, the characters emerge as robust, full-dimensional people in touch with their explosive feelings.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    These characters are mostly too sketchy and their connections too contrived for Shrink to jell as an incisive ensemble piece.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    Beneath its studiedly ugly surface, this bargain-basement answer to "Thelma and Louise" is as loathsome as any mindless, blood-drenched Hollywood action-adventure yarn.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    This pulpy, sex-drenched wartime epic seems frivolous, quaint and foolishly prurient.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Throughout Happy Hour, observations that mean next to nothing are presented as nuggets of profound enlightenment.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Ultimately seems naïve. In developing the comparison of sex and cannibalism, it never goes beyond the standard Draculian symbol of blood to include other bodily substances.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    Rarely has a film exhibited a bigger disconnect between urban realism and utter ludicrousness.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A supernatural thriller so mechanically inept and lacking in suspense that it doesn't even pass muster as lowbrow Halloween-ready entertainment.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Quickly turns into an earnest talkfest (spiced with flashes of nudity and sexually explicit dialogue) that feels stiffly programmatic and ultimately false.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The product is so synthetic it has only attitude where its heart ought to be.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 0 Stephen Holden
    No doubt there are those who will deem Simon Birch ''heartwarming.'' It is exactly the kind of movie that has given that hackneyed superlative a bad name.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Inhale is a creepy medical thriller in the tradition of "Coma" that amps up the tension and suspense by slicing up time.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The body-swapping premise, which is stale to begin with, isn't explored with any depth, unless you find meaningful Freudian subtext in the movie's relentless anal fixation. But the premise at least sets up a farce that surpasses "The Hangover" in gleeful crudeness and profanity.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Too lazy and too scared to say anything pertinent about love, society and the human condition, Four Lovers is content to be a pleasant, mildly titillating divertissement with no meaning at all.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Death in Love hasn't a drop of humor or hope. Its dull, smudged look makes every environment appear joyless and claustrophobic.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    What elevates the movie above the run-of-the-mill singles blender is its surreal sense of humor and technological finish.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    Why Mr. Foxx, who was so impressive in "Any Given Sunday," chose to make a movie so boring and idiotic that it barely meets minimal standards of lowest- common-denominator entertainment.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    If National Treasure mattered at all, you might call it a national disgrace, but this piece of flotsam is so inconsequential that it amounts to little more than a piece of Hollywood accounting.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Born to Be Blind, for all its haphazard structure, takes you about as far inside Maria's world as a film could reasonably be expected to go, but at moments it also feels uncomfortably exploitative.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    It's enough to say that the bland romantic comedy Life as We Know It, in which there is not a single deviation from formula, is well made for its corporate type.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Pitt is a reasonably photogenic specimen. But this actor, whose typical screen character is a broken, androgynous man-child, is disastrously miscast.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    This poorly acted, ramshackle tour of the lower echelons of the Los Angeles rock scene has the feel of a largely improvised home movie filmed without retakes, and its sense of humor could only be fully appreciated by struggling musicians.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    If Dot the i, the directorial debut of Matthew Parkhill, has a crass visual flash, it fails to give its characters any credible substance. Even after it purports to eviscerate their psyches, they remain diagrammatic contrivances.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Neither the screenplay nor the film's visual vocabulary begins to evoke a charged spiritual tension between the protagonist and the world.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The structure of When Will I Be Loved seems deliberately flimsy, and many of its details don't add up. But as a contemporary fable about getting and spending in the new gilded age, When Will I Be Loved strikes a chord that echoes.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The schmaltzy sports movie Legendary is a kind of contemporary answer to the old Charles Atlas ad in which a 97-pound weakling develops muscles and triumphantly punches out the bully at the beach.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    This female revenge comedy is so dumb, lazy, clumsily assembled and unoriginal, it could crush any actor forced to execute its leaden slapstick gags and mouth its crude, humorless dialogue.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    For all its demureness, Restless captures some of the excitement of youthful romance in which the partners aren't just separate individuals but the products of divergent cultures.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The kind of movie that is a must to avoid on a bad day. Even on a good one, it could send you into a funk.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Agreeable but flagrantly unoriginal.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    So busy building its symbolic frame that it forgets to develop its characters, or even to make them likable.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Silly, heavy-handed film.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A jewel-heist frolic so stale it feels like a retread of a retread.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The action is so frenetic that the ominous mood isn't allowed to penetrate, and this time the human factor is all but erased.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Although the movie captures the solidarity and the beauty and peril of a rustic mountain town whose residents are necessarily interdependent, its individual subplots don't connect. Despite several solid performances, the characters are too hazily sketched and too loosely linked to form a meaningful chain.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The movie is so busy applying cute touches to everything and everybody that it forgets to devote enough attention to the souls Michael has come down to save.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Tidy, predictable, excruciatingly fussy in its details and lacking the tiniest glimmer of humor, The Life Before Her Eyes contradicts the director’s claim in the production notes that the movie “is not a perfectly ordered experience with clear causes and effects.”
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Harris's coach is not a flashy role. But the actor, who effortlessly embodies an all-American ideal of strength and decency, drains as much of the syrup from his character as any actor could hope.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The film's biggest weakness is its unsympathetic main character, a snippy, nervous, expressionless control freak who gets more despicable as the story unfolds.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    With its off-center dialogue and upscale industrial settings, Gigantic strains to be original. But beneath its indie affectations it is really another contemplation of generational misunderstanding.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    If Mr. Neil had the tonal mastery of Wes Anderson, Goats could have been so much more than an episodic sequence of whimsical little psychodramas.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Dull, pretentiously verbose movie.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    What sets this syrupy swatch of kitsch apart from other films peddling a dogmatic religious agenda is the serious money that obviously went into it.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    A soft-hearted, squishy-minded prototype for a network sitcom, is mildly ingratiating but never laugh-out-loud funny. Even Ms. Hudson's intrepid radiance can't camouflage the premise's leaky foundation.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Essentially two movies stuck together like chewing gum on a subway platform. One is a dumber-than-dumb teen comedy crammed with farcical sight-gags and raunchy adolescent humor, the other a no-holds-barred satire of professional sports, and the greed, egotism and pomposity surrounding them.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    To describe August Rush as a piece of shameless hokum doesn’t quite do justice to the potentially shock-inducing sugar content of this contemporary fairy tale.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    If Kate's hyperkinetic cheer and shrill self-absorption are Carrie trademarks, 13 years after "Sex and the City" first appeared on television, their appeal has all but evaporated. I Don't Know How She Does It seems stuck in the past.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Written and directed by Bernard Rose (“Immortal Beloved”), 2 Jacks has a pleasing circular structure, and it doesn’t push the parallels between old and new Hollywood to absurd limits.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Difficult to swallow.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Levy's cold, streamlined direction gives the movie the feel of a mechanical contraption manipulated by remote control with a nervous finger on the fast-forward button. Many of the jokes barely have time to register before we're on to the next stunt.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    So snug, airtight and insulated from reality that the nice, well-scrubbed "Cheaper by the Dozen" seems almost rambunctious by comparison.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Brake is a full-scale paranoid nightmare with back-to-back double-whammy endings.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Nobody in this sweet-natured, low-testosterone trifle is out for blood. Mr. Hall gives an agreeable portrayal of a man-child not unlike David Fisher, his character on "Six Feet Under."
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A choppy, forgetful, suspense-free romp that substitutes campy humor for chills.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Because Kids in America can't decide whether it wants to be a stock teenage comedy or something more, it ends up stranded in the middle of nowhere.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Terminally whimsical, it generates a steady current of humor, much of it off-color.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Corny, suds-drenched movie. The kindest way of looking at this roughly patched-together story is as the cinematic equivalent of the music it memorializes.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    An ingenious contraption that holds your attention for as long as it whirs and clicks like a mechanized Rubik’s Cube. After it’s over, however, you may find yourself scratching your head and wondering if there was any purpose to this sleek little gizmo.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A clever, entertaining yarn that doesn't bear close scrutiny.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Made of Honor retains enough sweetness to satisfy the cotton-candy addicts. For true believers in fairy tales, no romantic fantasy is too extravagant if the heroine is a sweetheart. The rest of us can sit there and roll our eyes.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The movie itself is a shell. The characters, especially the unstable Hadley, barely exist. And even by the loose standards of film noir, the mechanics of the murder plot, and the story’s jolts and twists toward its abrupt surprise ending, are unconvincing.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Written and directed by the husband-wife team of Kieran and Michele Mulroney, Paper Man is so unsure of itself that its symbolic edifice feels like a desperately erected defense system.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The movie has the metabolism, logic and attention span of a peevish 6-year-old.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    A facile exercise in nihilism posing as an indie "Training Day" with street cred. Don't believe it.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The storytelling is infuriatingly coy, as if Mr. Haggis were trying to fool you (and himself) into thinking that he has something to say. Third Person finds Mr. Haggis, like Mr. Neeson’s screen alter ego, running on empty.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    So why? Why would stars of the magnitude of Mr. Cage and Ms. Kidman sign on to a project whose screenplay is so inept that the movie, even if profitable, will stand as a career-impeding setback? Can't they read?
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The obvious forerunner of My Wife Maurice, is "La Cage aux Folles," a movie that is several cuts above this frantically overwrought imitator.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The movie plays like a made-for-television quickie.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Annapolis has enough material for an exciting trailer. But that's all the movie really is: a trailer tricked out with protracted boxing sequences and an undernourished romantic subplot that culminates in a single tepid kiss.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    There are interesting ideas here, but they are swallowed up in dull, poorly choreographed shootouts and other action nonsense.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A trashily entertaining reptilian version of ''Jaws'' set in the steaming heart of the Amazon rain forest.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Too lazy and too loosely structured to accomplish much besides conveying some vivid physical impressions. There is no narrator, and the structure that exists is clouded by the new-age mumbo-jumbo of eight principal commentators.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A stultifying hybrid of athletic instruction film and Christian sermon.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The lesson of Showboy is how disturbingly easy it is for an audience to trust what it sees when confronted with a film posing as factual documentary.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    It is cleverly conceived, well acted and seasoned with blips of mildly acidic wit.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    War, Inc. is gonzo moviemaking with a bleeding heart. A satirical farce that wants to be "Dr. Strangelove" for the age of terrorism, it is a zany, nihilistic free-for-all that goes soft.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Although there is the germ of a very sharp comedy in the intersection of real mobsters and make-believe thugs in a Hollywood mob comedy, Analyze That is far too lazy to do much with it.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Good intentions do not guarantee good movies, or even watchable ones. A sad case in point is The Kid and I.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    In Ms. Mirren's first film to be directed by her husband, Taylor Hackford, since "White Nights" in 1985, her formidable dramatic resources can't camouflage flat writing that eventually veers into gloppy sentimentality. At times even Ms. Mirren, who adopts a regionless American accent, seems uncomfortable.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie ultimately belongs to Mr. Dorff, whose villain is as frightening as any human reptile to have slithered onto the screen in quite some time.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A moldy, post-cold-war spy thriller.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    The movie is so devoid of emotion that its ritualized gore acts as a narcotic. Filmed in shades of red, with a minimal screenplay, Only God Forgives looks like a ghoulish fashion shoot in hell. Three words should suffice: pretentious macho nonsense.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The movie’s only fresh element is the wintry setting, which shrouds everything in a mood of weary fatalism. Otherwise, it’s the same old, same old, efficiently discharged and utterly disposable.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    In trying to be both bold and nonthreatening, the movie ends up seeming tame and mildly offensive.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Likable but muddled screen biography.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Offering few laughs and a climactic scene of breathtaking cruelty, this plot-heavy movie, directed by Nick Hurran from a screenplay by Melissa Carter and Elisa Bell, draws you into its malignant force field against your will.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Short on laughs, if supremely inoffensive, this sleepy nonentity of a movie finds Mr. Lawrence in his huggable teddy bear mode.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Watching the first half-hour of Tooth Fairy is like reaching into a grab bag of novelties, as the movie unveils its tricks... After that, the wit more or less evaporates, replaced by bloated sentimentality and clumsy plot exposition.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    The movie is so sloppily written and directed that its bits of bluster never cohere.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    This dull, dawdling film, adapted from Françoise Dorner’s novel “La Douceur Assassine,” eventually succumbs to sentimentality.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Its serious intentions notwithstanding, Beware the Gonzo is essentially a comedy with a mean streak; its portrait of the big man on campus is truly venomous.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    After the Fall belongs to a type of movie that is too lazy to connect the dots and fill in the blanks between its supposedly teachable moments.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    If Ms. Bynes keeps going in this direction, she can conceivably develop a gallery of characters as rich and varied as Tracey Ullman's.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    But for all its provocation, Kedma is an often dull, incoherent film, and its characters remain frustratingly sketchy
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Even by the crude standards of teenage horror, Final Destination is dramatically flat.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A standard, gadget-crazed exercise in whiz-bang adventure with its tongue lodged deep inside its cheek.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The Jackal, like most expensive thrillers nowadays, knows how to do gadgets, pyrotechnics, underground subway chases and panicked crowd scenes. But except for Mr. Gere's uphill battle, it has only the vaguest idea of how to do people.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    So oblivious to genre that it occupies its own special stylistic niche, if you can imagine such a thing as a romantic revenge farce.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The Son of No One self-destructs in a ludicrous, ineptly directed anticlimactic rooftop showdown in which bodies pile up, and nothing makes a shred of sense.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A passionate but messy, often inarticulate home movie.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The characters never transcend the clichés embedded in the culture since "The Godfather."
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    In critical ways, the movie is a mess. The basketball scenes are so sloppy and haphazard that the would-be slapstick registers as confusion. But away from the court, the actors bring their caricatures to folksy comic life.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Filled with awful, recycled jokes.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The cinematographer-turned-director likes his MTV-style editing so much that in his drive for hyperkinetic overkill he sacrifices coherence to wallow in barely contained chaos.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Its message is quite simple and all too familiar: when it comes to sex, all men are little boys.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    A vile, witless sex comedy.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    As the movie methodically plods forward on a screenplay (by Shawn Slovo) consisting entirely of clichés and watered-down exposition, it becomes sadly apparent that its only reliable asset is the gorgeous view.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    This portrait of 20-something gay men and their straight friends is a joyless exploration of middle-class deadbeats (with the exception of Ephram) lost in a torpid funk of low self-regard. Because they’'e not rich, there is no sleazy zing of "Less Than Zero"-worthy glamor.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Maintaining a winking distance from his comic persona, Mr. Spade radiates a cunning show-business cynicism that lets you know he's aware that he's slumming to make a buck.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The movie builds to a human-versus-alien showdown so sloppily staged that it makes little visual sense. The bargain-basement pyrotechnics suggest that much of The Watch was filmed on autopilot on a strict budget.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Feels like a desperate attempt to stretch a flimsy half-hour made-for-cable concept into a feature film.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A very shallow comedy. For the real thing, rent “The Ref,” in which Kevin Spacey and Judy Davis, with a boost from Glynis Johns, set the house on fire.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Although the stunts come thick and fast in The Pink Panther 2, they are jammed together in a way that gives most of them barely enough time to register.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Ms. Hall’s Lotte is the weak link in the triangle. Despite all her character’s flowery words of longing, she can’t convey the heat bottled under Lotte’s demure demeanor.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The screenplay, by Mr. Cooper and Jonathan D. Krane, is so sketchy that it feels like a hastily executed first draft.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Acted with enough zest by its cast to give these not especially endearing people a poignant human dimension.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Once Why Stop Now? has exhausted its bag of tricks, there is a screeching of brakes as it approaches the edge of the cliff. Having expended all that stamina, the film collapses from exhaustion and settles for an abrupt, feel-good ending that is as perfunctory as it is preposterous.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    [An] overlong, drab, not-so-funny sports comedy.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A bleak, static mood piece about adolescent emptiness. There's little dialogue, and what there is offers the scantest information about Gerardo, who, as played by Mr. Ortuño, conveys an impenetrable blank-faced melancholy.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Even at 143 minutes, For Greater Glory cannot satisfyingly fill out the stories of a half-dozen secondary characters, and there are frustrating gaps in the biographies of Gorostieta and José. The jamming together of so much history and melodrama makes for a handsome movie that is only rarely gripping.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    You can only imagine how much stronger the movie might have been had it fleshed out subsidiary dramas whose outlines are barely discernible.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Ma Mère may be ludicrous, but its cast displays a commitment that deserves more than grudging admiration.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    This unwieldy amalgam of science fiction and horror, directed by Paul Anderson, douses almost every scene with glitzy special effects in a futile attempt to cover up a paucity of thought.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Had it exhibited a modicum of restraint, The Forsaken could have been twice as scary.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    As A Rumor of Angels reveals itself to be a sudsy tub of supernatural hokum, not even Ms. Redgrave's noblest efforts can redeem it from hopeless sentimentality.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Shirley’s instant metamorphosis from insecure high school student to ruthless madam is ludicrous in spite of the best efforts of the talented Ms. Waterston to convince you otherwise. The Babysitters has the increasingly jerky momentum of a film that was butchered in the cutting room, sacrificing continuity and character development to whip the plot forward.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Woody Allen proved long ago that the self-pitying introvert is a fit subject for a movie, but only if the film has a strong enough sense of humor to make us laugh at ourselves. But Brooks Branch, who directed Multiple Sarcasms and wrote the screenplay with Linda Morris, was either too lazy to come up with the absurdist aphorisms that might give Multiple Sarcasms a lift, or he labored under the delusion that Gabriel’s metaphysical malaise is such a fresh idea that it deserves microscopic inspection.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A business course on cutthroat capitalism disguised as a slacker comedy: That’s the kindest way to describe Michael Lehmann’s Flakes.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    An unsalvageable mess.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    If nothing else the ramshackle, scatterbrained rom-com What's Your Number? confirms the arrival, heralded by "Bridesmaids," of a new subgenre, the smutty chick flick, into the Hollywood mainstream.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Lullaby, the directorial debut of Andrew Levitas, a jack of all artistic trades, is the kind of manipulative, cliché-infested hokum that alienates moviegoers by its insistence on hogging all the tears.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The campy new screen adaptation of The Three Musketeers has all the reality and visceral excitement of a $75 million literary theme park dotted with fancy villages heavily patrolled by security.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Exudes a randy, robust charm as it unapologetically thumbs its nose at respectability and everything the word implies.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Muddled little dud of a melodrama.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A leaden, skimpily plotted space-age Outward Bound adventure with vague allegorical aspirations that remain entirely unrealized.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    If there is any humor to be gleaned from this concept, it is nowhere to be found in a movie so shoddily made that there is little continuity between scenes and not a laugh or even a titter.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    A wooden police thriller that is as dull as it is impenetrable and ultimately beyond ludicrous.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Once you've accepted the notion that On the Line gives product placement in movies a blatant new prominence, the film turns out to be a soothing cinematic snack of milk and cookies.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Not likely to spur much tourism to Greece. The sights, though impressive, are not photographed interestingly, and the citizens of the host country are less than welcoming.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The home-movie crudeness of Dead or Alive: Final indicates it was made on the cheap with minimal preparation.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Much of the skimpy, waterlogged dialogue in Peter Vanderwall's screenplay is heavy with portent. Excerpts from Homer's "Odyssey" and Longfellow's "Children's Hour" add to the tonnage.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A semicoherent, overacted mélange of travelogue, farce and suds.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The Ledge, it should be noted, is not dumb. What undoes it is its mechanical structure: a stale dramatic formula of the sort taught in elementary playwriting classes.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    May be humorless, paranoid nonsense, but its biggest failure is its inability to scare.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Plays like a middling episode of “Law & Order: SVU,” drawn out an extra half-hour and embellished with pretentious literary and cinematic flourishes.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Makes no psychological sense. Even within the convoluted realm of film noir, the development of the relationships defies any logic.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The re- enactments, however fascinating they may be as history, are too crude to serve the work especially well.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Yet the movie sustains a mood. It passionately believes in itself and in the value of the messy artistic lives it glosses, and some of that belief rubs off on you.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A scare movie about gambling addiction, is as grim and lurid as any in the recent spate of films about the evils of crystal meth.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Ms. Silverstone's pouty all-American brashness counts for little in a film whose flat screenplay doesn't give her a single funny line.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    But after 15 minutes, this yellow-orange vision of spiraling circles of hell, snorting devils and demonic shapes continually morphing out of one another, begins to seem redundant and conceptually impoverished.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The tone of Knife Fight is mean until the movie flips a switch and turns pious and mawkish as Paul tries to make amends for past sins. Whether playing it sleazy or noble, Mr. Lowe brings little emotional weight to his role.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The weakest parts of Safe Haven are its action sequences, in which the illusion of reality is shattered by ham-handed editing, garish special effects and comic-book dialogue.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The screenplay never begins to finds a workable balance between wit and adventure. And the performances in several smaller roles are so mechanical that they lend Kill Me Later the tone of a vanity production.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    What it does offer, however, are the pleasures of watching its seasoned stars expertly go through their familiar paces.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The screenplay is closer in tone to an uneasy mixture of post-"Seinfeld" bile and unfocused Altmanesque satirical misanthropy. Partly because the story's structure is so haphazard, most of the jokes land with a thud.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    An awkward, long-winded mash-up of therapy session, horror movie and survival tale with pretensions of psychological depth.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The only thing about the movie that isn't a transparent paste imitation is Douglas' hard, gleaming performance.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    To describe And Now a Word From Our Sponsor as a one-joke skit stretched well beyond the breaking point isn’t entirely fair, because when used ingeniously, which is very seldom, the joke lands.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A gaudy thriller saturated in sex and violence, is an extravagance that leaves you with your mouth hanging open - partly in admiration of its audacity and partly in disbelief at its preposterousness.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    A clumsy remake of the 1987 cult thriller.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Virginia is a wildly unpredictable piece of work. Playing the kind of role that is often associated with Laura Dern, Ms. Connelly gives a brave, full-tilt performance that is true to the character but can't hold the movie together.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A mechanically efficient chase-by-numbers movie.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The movie, which is crudely dubbed into English, lacks the raucous, anything-for-a-shock carnival humor of its American prototypes. After it's over, the only question worth asking is whether dear, cozy old Heidelberg can survive the slander.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The Baytown Outlaws" avidly subscribes to the grindhouse aesthetic of Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez. If it has the right spit-in-your-face attitude, it has neither the stamina nor the wit to go the distance, although it makes it about two-thirds of the way.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Beyond the lugubrious pageantry, there is no sign of emotional or spiritual life in the film, only windy posturing.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The vital signs in Love Happens, a movie that feels likes a laboriously padded outline, are faint.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    The movie is so witless and confused in tone that its seedy racetrack clientele only emerge as dim, inarticulate cartoons.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Fatally true to the hypocritical values of its niche market. While pretending to teach a lesson in compassion, it wallows in the perks of privilege.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Comic mishap, whose satire already feels out of date.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A chilly machine-tooled comedy.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    As it lurches between mush and farce, Very Annie Mary churns up a few genuinely funny bits.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The movie has a frantic staccato style that is more game-oriented than cinematic.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The fatal flaw of this well-acted movie, whose creators are sex industry veterans, is its refusal to examine Angelina's occupation from outside the bubble. You might even call it a recruitment film.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Turns into an impenetrable essay on guilt, memory and the fear of death that even Mr. Langella's gravity cannot salvage.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Advance word of mouth has suggested that Ms. Basinger...turns in a performance comparable to Meryl Streep's in "Out of Africa." Would that it were so. Ms. Basinger certainly works hard at her role.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    54
    Years from now, if Mark Christopher's timid, meandering film 54 is spoken of at all, it will probably be lumped together with Whit Stillman's ''Last Days of Disco'' as one of two movies released in 1998 to bungle the same opportunity.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Not everyone will be thrilled by the movie, which is one long dirty (and occasionally very funny) joke.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    A wispy pubescent comedy.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    An incoherent hybrid of buddy movie, "Girls Gone Wild" episode and James Bond spoof that employs cheap cinematic tricks like multiple split screens for no apparent purpose.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Although Garmento exhibits a flailing comic energy, its eagerness to condemn everything about Seventh Avenue, along with its sub-par acting and a choppy narrative style that finally runs amok, lends it a tone of hysterical finger-pointing.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The film's elegantly tricky cinematography and ominous, pounding score by Hans Zimmer (provocatively juxtaposed with the Rolling Stones), only underline the emptiness behind its technical flash.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The best jokes in this scattershot screwball satire of job insecurity, upward mobility, political correctness and yuppie marital tensions have claws that leave scratches.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Edwards, who wrote and directed Land of the Blind (it's his debut film), might counter that the movie is a Brechtian comedy that's not supposed to make literal sense: the big picture is what matters. But the big picture is a mess.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    UHF
    The movie is forever digressing so that Mr. Yankovic can offer media spoofs that have only the most tangential relation to the story. [22 Jul 1989, p.1.15]
    • The New York Times
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Are they fools or heroes? Because the movie can't decide, neither can we. And without an emotional payoff, Play It to the Bone ends up stranded in serio-comic limbo.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Oldman and Mr. Ford are the only actors in the film, directed by Robert Luketic (“Legally Blonde”), skillful enough to navigate the yards of jargon-packed boilerplate in Jason Hall and Barry L. Levy’s thudding screenplay.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    This misty-eyed Southern nostalgia piece, in treading the line between sappy and sanguine, winds up mired in tear-drenched quicksand.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Turns into a meticulously choreographed bang-by-the-numbers action fantasy that I would accuse of peddling evil if the film weren't so dumb and incoherent.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Godzilla is so clumsily structured it feels as if it's two different movies stuck together with an absurd stomping finale glued onto the end.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Watching the movie is like reaching into a Christmas stocking and pulling out handfuls of cheap plastic toys that are broken.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Sergio's urban melodrama Under Hellgate Bridge suggests the contemporary equivalent of any number of 1930's B movies.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Wants to be both a realistic family drama and a mythical odyssey but lacks the substance to be much more than a vignette.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    This disjointed, desperately whimsical film is simply not funny: not for a minute.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    You may view Untraceable, as I do, as a repugnant example of the voyeurism it pretends to condemn.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    A movie that knows its audience. Its underlying philosophy might be: why try harder when this is all they expect?
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    It may have been a shrewd business decision by the film’s director, Miguel Sapochnik, to treat the story as a nasty, comic thriller. But when, after a certain point, Repo Men subsumes its satire to strenuous action sequences, it loses its edge and turns into a chase movie of no special distinction.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    This catastrophe of a movie zigzags drunkenly between action-adventure and surreal comedy with some magical realism slopped over it like ketchup.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A slapdash, poorly acted, paint-by-numbers teen horror comedy, the sequel is too frenetically edited to build any suspense, and its special effects are strictly bargain basement.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The director, as he showed in movies like "After Dark, My Sweet," and "Fear," specializes in conjuring conspiratorial atmospheres in which anxiety and sexual menace hang in the air like a heavy, bitter perfume. Long after you've dismissed the movie's ridiculous, convoluted story, traces of that scent may linger.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Compared to Gray Matters, even a Nora Ephron bonbon has the weight of urban neo-realism.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    If you're looking for a 90-minute post-teen soap opera with pretty people, ludicrous hairpin turns and a whopper of an ending, the movie will keep you mindlessly off balance.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The movie is a continuous barrage of explosions, sneak attacks, chases, life-and-death face-offs, and amazing rescues that are as far-fetched as they are exhilarating. The cheap thrills are compounded by Mikko Alanne and David Battle's screenplay, a wallow in old-time Hollywood boilerplate, some of which you can't believe is being recycled yet again.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Once the plot has sprung into action, High School is a bumpy ride that takes a few amusing dives but never coheres into anything special.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Whatever else it may accomplish, Garden Party, which is clumsily structured but well acted, with pungently realistic dialogue, puts you in a world without a center in which you can't tell upside down from right-side up.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Were it a farce instead of an earnest, paranoid thriller with pretensions to historicity, An American Affair might not seem so offensively exploitative. The fact that it is quite well acted, especially by Ms. Mol, who has the air of a sophisticated 1960s party animal down pat, only compounds the insult.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Squandered in foolish horseplay and on a story that zigzags so far out of control that it feels as if the screenwriter, Steve Adams, pasted together a bunch of zany notions in a frantic search for confusion.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    A shrunken, cowardly movie in deep denial of its true nature, which is far uglier than it is ever willing to admit.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    You have to admire the effort its attractive cast expends pumping life into stilted, flowery dialogue that confuses pretentious attitudinizing with profound insight.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The Skeptic turns into a cut-and-dried Freudian melodrama that gives repressed memory a supernatural dimension. I'll take a bunch of teenagers terrorized by chain-saw-wielding zombies any day.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Its satire is too broad to carry much of a sting.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    At a certain point this would-be shocker suddenly jerks into high gear and becomes a blatant, incompetent rip-off of "Psycho."
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    If it feels uncomfortably real, it's because its vision of decadence (if you'll pardon the word) is almost unwatchably creepy. Crazy Eyes awakens the same queasiness. Yes, it feels true. But why bother?
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The kindest thing to be said for this frantic, cluttered mess of cheesy computer-generated action-adventure clichés is that at least you can see how the estimated $175 million budget was spent.

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