Stephen Holden
Select another critic »
For 1,958 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephen Holden's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 The Double Hour
Lowest review score: 0 Whipped
Score distribution:
1,958 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The rainbow connection is a smooth, unbroken arch.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The Witnesses may frustrate those who prefer movies that tell clear-cut stories in which hard lessons are learned. But in the director’s farsighted vision of life, the ground under our feet is always shifting. As time pulls us forward, the shocks of the past are absorbed and the pain recedes. In its light-handed way, The Witnesses is profound.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Hal Holbrook strips the stereotype of the grumpy old man of sentimental shtick and cutesy old-codger mannerisms.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Dark Days illustrates even the worst nightmare can have descending levels of horror.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    If Liberty Heights is much too soft at its center, it still offers a deeper immersion in that old '50s feeling than any other Hollywood film in recent memory.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    One of the juiciest male characters to pop up in an independent film this year.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    If repetition has stripped Iran's post-revolutionary cinema of some of its modish luster, The Deserted Station is still a valuable addition to a literature whose characteristics are now internationally well-established.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    The wistful, overarching theme is the passing of time in the lives of young adults, aware of growing older, who seek to ground themselves in relationships and work, but relationships most of all. The movie reminds you with a series of gentle nudges that whether you want it to or not, the future happens.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    A slender Chekhovian vignette about the joys and regrets of old age and the pleasures of sociability.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Gathers riveting, rarely seen news clips from the era into a chronology that plays like a suspenseful police drama.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    I can't recall another thriller that has maintained this kind of velocity without going kablooey and losing its train of thought.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Galiana's quietly monumental performance is one for the ages.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Not a horror movie but a witty, expertly constructed psychological thriller.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The Iranian director Majid Majidi’s sad, soulful film The Willow Tree is his second movie to explore blindness and sight on multiple levels.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Family dynamics examined through the prism of art: The Woodmans, C. Scott Willis's compelling documentary study of an artistic clan whose comfortable life was shattered by the suicide of its youngest member, asks profound questions to which there really are no answers.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie's biggest disappointment is the vague, unfocused performance of Ms. Ricci, an actress known for taking risky, unsympathetic roles. Here she seems somewhat intimidated by her character.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The Skeleton Twins is a well-written and acted movie about contemporary life that doesn’t strain for melodrama and is largely devoid of weepy soap opera theatrics. A small, precise, character-driven vignette, it has no pretensions to make any kind of grand statement about The Way We Live Now.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    In its unassuming way, this tiny, low-budget film is a universal reflection on issues of personal identity and choice for which there are no easy answers.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Tries to do too much in too little time. It would be a stronger film if it devoted more detailed attention to the plight of the returning veteran. As it stands, it is a scattershot antiwar polemic that doesn't bolster its arguments with any historical perspective or statistical evidence. No one from the government or the military is trotted out to give an opposing view. This is not to say that The Ground Truth, on its own terms, isn't devastating.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Looks and feels like a fever dream about an alternate universe. Suffused with a sense of wonder, it hovers, dancing inside its own ethereal bubble.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    If there were more experimental films as entertaining as The Decay of Fiction, Pat O’Neill's luminous Hollywood ghost story, the notion of a thriving avant-garde cinema might not be so intimidating to the moviegoing public.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    The movie’s unblinking observation of a friendship put to the test is amused, queasy making, kindhearted and unfailingly truthful.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The film fails to convey the claustrophobic terror experienced by a man who called his book "Letters From Hell."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    It places Basquiat's art in a cultural context with an enthusiasm and zest that make the many pictures shown come blazingly alive.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    [A] small, likably sentimental film.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Calm, deliberate and devastating, Jessica Sanders's documentary After Innocence confirms many of the worst fears about weaknesses in the American criminal-justice system.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    This is civilized human behavior captured with a clinical precision and accuracy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    When it comes to actual historical details, Farewell crams too many notions into expositional blips of dialogue. And the scenes of conferences in the corridors of power, whether in Moscow, Paris or Washington, are strained and abrupt.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Frustratingly sketchy partly because it is not finally a survival tale but a mystical evocation of the power of Inuit mythology, and how the passing down of ancient wisdom can sustain the human spirit in the direst circumstances. But the unanswered questions still nag.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Settles for being an atmospheric scenes-in-the-life biography of someone's most unforgettable character. It could have been so much more.

Top Trailers