Stephen Holden

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For 2,214 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephen Holden's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 The Hours
Lowest review score: 0 Heartbreak Hospital
Score distribution:
2214 movie reviews
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    These cinematic feats are accomplished with meat-cleaver editing and awkward, jittery computer-generated imagery. The well-cast voices for the expressionless animals are at least good for a few smirks.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    May be as exhaustive a study of one man's midlife crisis as has ever been brought to the screen. But as the movie lopes along, exhaustive becomes exhausting.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The biggest weakness in Nina's Tragedies, is the character of Nadav. His shadowy presence leaves the movie without a solid center around which to spin its tales.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Hotel de Love, the directing and screenwriting debut of Craig Rosenberg, is like a Valentine's Day box of heart-shaped chocolates that all have the same too-sweet cherry fillings.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    In a year overcrowded with wonderful performances by lead actors, Mr. Murphy's immensely appealing turn ranks among the strongest.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Like most documentary polemics, it simplifies the issues it confronts and selects facts that bolster its black-and-white, heroes-and-villains view of raw economic power.
    • The New York Times
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Makes a jolly absurdist stew out of its sources.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A streamlined, adrenalized thriller that is not as deep as it would like to appear, treads a retrospective political tightrope.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    So narratively garbled and its screenplay so underwritten that you have to strain to piece together the story.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Together, however, they add up to a film that may be the closest movies have come to the cinematic equivalent of a collection of Chekhov short stories.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Very funny, extremely obscene movie spinoff from the popular animated Comedy Central series.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    A visual adventure worthy of that much degraded adjective, awesome.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It conveys plenty of wonder while mostly avoiding any saccharine preachiness.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The only thing about the movie that isn't a transparent paste imitation is Douglas' hard, gleaming performance.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Makes the best possible argument for a cautionary drama that contemplates the absolute worst in us.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A very shallow comedy. For the real thing, rent “The Ref,” in which Kevin Spacey and Judy Davis, with a boost from Glynis Johns, set the house on fire.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Beyond the Sea, with all its gaping faults, is the genuine article. It succeeds in being deeply and sincerely insincere.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    (Shue's) sweetly likable performance is the only coherent element in a film that has the impersonal feel of a television drama slapped together in a rush.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Throughout Grbavica the desire to forget and the need to remember are at loggerheads. At Sara’s school the psychological wounds of the war are being handed down to her generation through the separation of heroes and nonheroes. Fathers pass their weapons down to their sons. Even as you leave a war behind, you bring it with you.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The wonder is that The Great Debaters transcends its own simplifying and manipulative ploys; it radiates nobility of spirit.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Until it transforms into an improbable thriller, Turn the River is a finely observed portrait of a desperate working-class woman who refuses to play by ordinary rules.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    There are brave, boundary-breaching movies, and there are mad, foolhardy ones. Harry and Max belongs to the latter breed.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    One of the rare documentaries you leave wishing it was a little bit longer.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Despite its sociological tidbits and flashes of musical vitality, Saudade do Futuro never goes anywhere.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Gathers you up on its white horse and gallops off into the sunset. Along the way, it serves a continuing banquet of high-end comfort food perfectly cooked and seasoned to Anglophilic tastes.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Loses tension (and ultimately credibility) as it wanders through three possible endings before grinding to a halt.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Julie Gavras’s wonderful film, Blame It on Fidel, views its ideological conflicts through the eyes of a smart, willful child.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Audacious as it is, the movie is also a little scary.
    • 10 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    Easily the most inept episode of the Halloween series, The Curse of Michael Myers, which opened yesterday, is so busy cramming half-baked supernatural rigmarole into its formula that it has forgotten how to be suspenseful.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    May
    Led by Ms. Bettis's discreetly campy May, the performances are a cut or two above what you would find in the average slasher film. But in the end that's all it is.
    • 1 Metascore
    • 0 Stephen Holden
    The Singing Forest was written and directed by Jorge Ameer, whose film "Strippers" opened three years ago and remained the single worst movie I had ever reviewed -- until now.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A jewel-heist frolic so stale it feels like a retread of a retread.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    A political movie that, partly through the powerful lead performance of its star, the relatively young Yves Montand, transcends its own politics.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Like "I Am Sam," it is a film that tests your cynicism.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Art executed under the most excruciating conditions deserves a far more searching study than this too short film, which has the structure of a hurried checklist. Even so, a lot of the art shown in the documentary, often side-by-side with photographs of the same places and events, is compelling.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    As inspiring as it is, Doing Time, Doing Vipassana is too sweet for its own good; it plays like a spiritual infomercial.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Quietly inflammatory film.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Settles for being an atmospheric scenes-in-the-life biography of someone's most unforgettable character. It could have been so much more.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    The masterstroke of this small, heartfelt directorial debut (by Peter Care, from a screenplay by Jeff Stockwell) is its integration of animated sequences (by Todd McFarlane) in which action-adventure caricatures of the comic book characters parallel or comment on events in the boys' lives.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The scruffy, outspoken train-hoppers in Sarah George's exhilarating documentary, Catching Out, are a sure sign that the pioneer spirit still flickers in pockets of TV-wired America.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Grounding the zaniness is the chemistry between its two likable stars. Beneath their crusty eccentricities, Max and John are teen-agers at heart, a Wayne and Garth for the "Modern Maturity" set. As Max, his leathery face beaming with pleasure, might put it: "Holy moley, is this a dumb movie!" But it is also fun.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    This candy-colored movie, whose soft hues match the colored cereal loops that Alby devours at his mother's house, is a post-Freudian fable that wants to be a kind of anti-"Wizard of Oz" for a culture inundated with toys and toons.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The franchise, which had begun to run out of steam in Part 2, has been given a shot of adrenaline with the replacement of the Wayans Brothers as the prime creative forces by Hollywood's original spoof-meister, David Zucker.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The most moving aspect of Collateral Damages is the firefighters' sense of brotherhood and duty to their jobs. It is expressed matter-of-factly, without a shred of smugness or superiority, almost with embarrassment.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Scary enough to make the faint of heart decide never to venture into the woods or to lie on the grass again without protective covering.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A choppy, forgetful, suspense-free romp that substitutes campy humor for chills.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Calm, deliberate and devastating, Jessica Sanders's documentary After Innocence confirms many of the worst fears about weaknesses in the American criminal-justice system.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Good intentions do not guarantee good movies, or even watchable ones. A sad case in point is The Kid and I.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Inspiring enough to make you wish that the filmmakers had reined in their sentimental excesses.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Instead of building sustained comic set pieces, it takes a machine-gun approach to humor. Without looking at where it's aiming, it opens fire and sprays comic bullets in all directions, trusting that a few will hit the bull's-eye. A few do, but many more don't.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The lead performances of Home Room go a long way toward camouflaging the severe flaws of this exceedingly earnest movie.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Handsomely photographed and inspirational, but not cloyingly so, it is the rare contemporary documentary that doesn't leave a residue of cynicism and outrage.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    So busy building its symbolic frame that it forgets to develop its characters, or even to make them likable.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Garfield's performance makes Jack so endearing and vulnerable that as he takes his first wobbly steps, like a baby bird shoved from its nest, your instincts are protective.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    A very funny for-kids-of-all-ages delight that should catapult Mr. Black straight to the top of the A-list of Hollywood funnymen.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Ms. Zellweger accomplishes the small miracle of making Bridget both entirely endearing and utterly real.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    This spare, minimalist film is not realistic. It has the simplicity of a silent movie, and the blocking of the actors, especially in the scenes with Koistinen and Mirja, emphasizes the distances between them.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Newell is master of the feel-good ensemble piece whose shallowness is partly masked by the expertise of a high-toned cast.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    To warm to Manderlay, the chilly second installment of Lars von Trier's not-yet-finished three-part Brechtian allegory examining United States history, you must be willing to tolerate the derision and moral arrogance of a snide European intellectual thumbing his nose at American barbarism.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A lightweight comedy that has more than enough laughs to justify its silly, scatterbrained premise.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    For all its flighty charms, The Extra Man never really lands. It hovers like a hummingbird madly beating its wings to stay aloft.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Insurrection is breezily paced, and Michael Piller's screenplay has enough good-natured humor to keep things from bogging down into sentimental pomposity.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    A powerful and disturbing reminder of how a civilization can suddenly crack under certain pressures.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    An upbeat meat-and-potatoes movie.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Aside from appreciating the movie's sturdy performances, my reaction to this satire of the middle-class, all-German family swung from revulsion to mystification.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Spike Lee has grabbed a tiger by the tail in his scabrously risky new comedy, Bamboozled. The wonder is how long he succeeds in hanging on.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The film's elegantly tricky cinematography and ominous, pounding score by Hans Zimmer (provocatively juxtaposed with the Rolling Stones), only underline the emptiness behind its technical flash.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As for the man who invented it all, he remains a mystery in the film, living out his days in sybaritic bliss.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Somewhere around its midpoint, Across the Universe captured my heart, and I realized that falling in love with a movie is like falling in love with another person. Imperfections, however glaring, become endearing quirks once you’ve tumbled.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Strathairn's complex, exquisitely nuanced portrayal of a man who goes over the line allows his character to be both hero and villain, sometimes at once.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    This is high-speed action realism carried off with the dexterity of a magician pulling a hundred rabbits out of a hat in one graceful gesture. The crowning flourish is an extended car chase through the streets and tunnels of Moscow that ranks as one of the three or four most exciting demolition derbies ever filmed.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Helmer's wildly whimsical debut film, Tuvalu, is the kind of movie that might one day find itself in the hall of fame of surreal movie weirdness alongside cult favorites like "Eraserhead," "Delicatessen" and the avant-garde frolics of Guy Maddin.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The House of Yes was adapted from a play by Wendy MacLeod. And the movie, with its brittle, outrageous dialogue has a shrill stagy feel. That would be fine, if the dialogue sustained the stylish crackle of a drawing-room comedy gone berserk, but there are many gaping holes between the funny moments.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Elling believes so fervently in humanity that it feels almost anachronistic, and it is too cute by half. But arriving at a particularly dark moment in history, it offers flickering reminders of the ties that bind us.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Holden
    A thorny masterpiece.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The harder this desperately obsequious circus of a movie tries to entertain, the more it falls short.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Brilliantly realized but bone-chillingly bleak.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Hal Holbrook strips the stereotype of the grumpy old man of sentimental shtick and cutesy old-codger mannerisms.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Upbeat.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    You have to admire the effort its attractive cast expends pumping life into stilted, flowery dialogue that confuses pretentious attitudinizing with profound insight.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The Arrival, like so many science-fiction films, begins as a promisingly eerie mixture of pseudo-scientific exposition and chilly paranoia. But once its plot has been bared, it turns into a muddled chase movie filled with glaring inconsistencies.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Doesn't really know how to end. But if its melodramatic final moments are ludicrous, they don't seriously dilute the acidity of the sour little swatch of urban sociology that has come before.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A surprisingly unpolished piece of work that plays as though it were written for the stage and only slightly modified for the screen.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    How was this careless, self-destructive human rhythm machine able to outlast almost all her peers? Maybe the vitality of the jazz she made kept her alive. She was one tough lady.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Originally released seven years ago on home video, is only now surfacing as a theatrical release. Although it's no classic, it's a cut or two smarter than the average Hollywood comedy. At its best, it plays like a less acerbic, less Jewish triple episode of "Curb Your Enthusiasm." (review of re-release)
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Melancholy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Documents of a flourishing below-the-radar culture, often involving older musicians who won't be around much longer, they are archival records as well as entertainments.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    One of the juiciest male characters to pop up in an independent film this year.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The movie is an amusing ball of fluff that refuses to judge its characters’ amoral high jinks. Winking at the vanity of wealthy voluptuaries and hustlers playing games of tainted love, it heaves a sigh and says welcome to the human comedy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A meditation on the scale of a catastrophe so enormous that all the assembled resources seem paltry and inadequate.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The scenes between the young lovers confronting adult authority have the same seething tension and lurking hysteria that the young Warren Beatty and Natalie Wood brought more than 40 years ago to their roles in "Splendor in the Grass."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Too fixated on 1939 for its own good. Its passionate immersion in a past that only dimly resonates with younger audiences may be a badge of its integrity, but that immersion trumps its vision of the future and leaves us in a land of nostalgia.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Advance word of mouth has suggested that Ms. Basinger...turns in a performance comparable to Meryl Streep's in "Out of Africa." Would that it were so. Ms. Basinger certainly works hard at her role.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A movie that pits a substantial actor like Mary McDonnell, playing a New York madam, against a bogus story that crossbreeds noirish affectations and romantic comedy into an unpalatable mush that suggests strawberry ice cream slathered with beer.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    These stylized images by the Australian artist Peter Coad create an aesthetic distance from the cruelty, lending the atrocities the stature of events in a historical mural that freezes the past into an eternal present.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Tombstone is a movie that wants to have it both ways. It wants to be at once traditional and morally ambiguous. The two visions don't quite harmonize.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Born to Be Blind, for all its haphazard structure, takes you about as far inside Maria's world as a film could reasonably be expected to go, but at moments it also feels uncomfortably exploitative.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    If Mr. Shicoff ultimately comes across as a short-tempered, egotistical prima donna, the upshot of all the fuss is worth it: his Viennese performance is transcendent.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A candy-colored, unabashedly sentimental movie.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    If Mr. Duvall's finely textured performance is a testament to the power of good screen acting to lift a film above the mundane, the movie's many irritating tics demonstrate that he is much more at home in front of the camera than behind it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Drugstore Cowboy, Gus Van Sant Jr.'s glum, absorbing film about a clan of heroin addicts who travel around the Pacific Northwest Looting pharmacies of their supplies the way Bonnie and Clyde cleaned out banks, gives Matt Dillon the role of his career.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Mighty Joe Young, directed by Ron Underwood from a screenplay by Mark Rosenthal and Lawrence Konner, is saddled with dialogue so wooden that Mr. Paxton and Ms. Theron almost seem animatronic themselves. Little children won't notice. In Joe, they can identify with the biggest, cuddliest simian toy a 6-year-old could ever hope to own.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Although it is not a comedy, Lion’s Den is suffused with sense of life lived in the present. Even the grimmest moments are not exploited to instill fear and loathing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A pleasantly sappy fable of new beginnings that suggests a Frank Capra film sweetened with an extra layer of sugar glaze.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    What sets this syrupy swatch of kitsch apart from other films peddling a dogmatic religious agenda is the serious money that obviously went into it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    It is wonderful at conveying a sense of suffocating ennui. Too wonderful, since the story is so sketchily told and the dialogue is so fragmentary that it doesn't quite cohere. The characters remain hazy ciphers in the torpid atmosphere of a place you'll never want to visit.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Winter Sleepers has many such breathtaking moments in which sounds and images synergize with an explosive precision.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Maintains a tone that remains as light and easygoing as the Australians living in the area.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    It's all so seamy, sordid, lurid and shocking! And dull, despite a noirish gloss of wide-angle cinematography and a jaundiced, smoggy color scheme.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Has an episodic rhythm and little dramatic tension.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Cartlidge's beautifully still performance, mournful one moment, defiant the next, lets you see into Claire's soul without editorializing or begging for our empathy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    The Namesake, adapted from Jhumpa Lahiri’s popular novel, conveys a palpable sense of people as living, breathing creatures who are far more complex than their words might indicate.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    As it lurches between mush and farce, Very Annie Mary churns up a few genuinely funny bits.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Like "The Sixth Sense," He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not reaches for a crowning final twist, but in this case it falls flat.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Were it a farce instead of an earnest, paranoid thriller with pretensions to historicity, An American Affair might not seem so offensively exploitative. The fact that it is quite well acted, especially by Ms. Mol, who has the air of a sophisticated 1960s party animal down pat, only compounds the insult.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Not especially innovative in its look or subject matter.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Take the Lead, despite its nifty concept and fiery leading man, feels sloppy and rushed.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Brodsky's final screen performance in one of his richest roles finds overlapping layers of humor and pathos.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Reminds you that marital discord knows no geographic boundaries.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The lesson of this story: if enough money is involved, greed trumps morality.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    As informative and packed with cultural lore as it is, The Komediant is dramatically diffuse.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Solemn, sentimental bore of a movie that suffocates in its own predictability and watered-down psychobabble.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    It has the tone and texture of a well-made but forgettable television movie.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Presents itself as an anguished brief against capital punishment, especially the execution of people who are legally insane...But the timing of its release smacks of the very exploitation that Mr. Bloomfield condemns.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Not everyone will be thrilled by the movie, which is one long dirty (and occasionally very funny) joke.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    An interminable mess of a film that juggles more characters and undeveloped subplots than it can handle and even manages to bungle the setup.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Reel Paradise is a deliberately untidy, open-ended, thoroughly absorbing chronicle that lets the lives of its characters spill across the screen without editorializing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    At heart a Frank Capra-style social fable for the '90s.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The question is why. Why would a star of Michael Douglas's stature and intelligence attach himself to a Washington thriller as deeply ridiculous, suspense-free and potentially career-damaging as The Sentinel?
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The documentary illustrates the premise that if you lie down with dogs, you wake up with fleas. Until everything collapses, and the filmmakers are left grasping at straws, it's absorbing in a sick way.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A high-minded, lethally dull biography of the legendary golfer Bobby Jones.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    By treating the genre as a joke, this satire, whose title plays off George A. Romero's 1979 golden oldie, "Dawn of the Dead," yields ironic dramatic dividends.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    The film is a requiem for the living as well as for the dead.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The author's fantastical world of wonders and the director's tender-hearted compassion mesh into what is easily the finest film realization of an Irving novel.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    When a poetically inclined film fixates on the same image too often, it is a sign that the movie may have succumbed to its own dreamy esthetic. That is one of the problems of The Neon Bible, the English director Terence Davies's hallucinatory portrait of the American South half a century ago.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Does an impressive job of relating the complicated history of the war and of filling in the background.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    So preoccupied with delivering its effects that it doesn't bother to make sense of its story.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Wang and his screenwriting collaborator, Lu Wei (“Farewell My Concubine”), portray a world that, apart from its hardship, is thoroughly recognizable in its human complexity. Its characters are motivated by the same needs for companionship and material well-being and the same demons — greed, lust, jealousy and despair -- that drive everybody.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The movie...tries to juggle too many characters at once (its title means "story plot" in Hebrew), and in several cases their connections aren't adequately explained.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The role of Jimmy is one of Mr. Jackson's scarier characters, and this brilliant actor inhabits all four corners of his jittery, avaricious personality. When he and Sydney finally clash, the movie makes its darkest, cleverest turn into film-noir nightmare.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Ends up stranded in the wilderness between comedy and rushed, halfhearted melodrama.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Overly schematic, not always believable in its crude sexual mechanics and ultimately unsensual. But it lays out the laws of erotic attraction with a brutal directness that is downright scary.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie isn't entirely despairing. Near the end, it suggests that contemporary Tunisian women with enough fighting spirit can achieve a measure of autonomy, although the personal cost may be bitter. And the movie's sun-drenched views of life on the southern Tunisian island of Jerba are beautiful.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Holden
    A beautifully written, seamlessly directed film with award-worthy performances by Ms. Rampling and Ms. Young.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Even if it doesn't add up to more than a fitfully amusing collection of comic sketches, Color Me Kubrick is a platform for John Malkovich to burst into lurid purple flame.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The movie has a frantic staccato style that is more game-oriented than cinematic.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    An ingenious contraption that holds your attention for as long as it whirs and clicks like a mechanized Rubik’s Cube. After it’s over, however, you may find yourself scratching your head and wondering if there was any purpose to this sleek little gizmo.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    If the Yes Men’s antics have a lot in common with the stunts of Sacha Baron Cohen and Michael Moore, they are executed more in the spirit of dry amusement than as showboating, gotcha moments.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    In juxtaposing two extraordinary personal histories, it ponders in a refreshingly original way unanswerable questions about memory, imagination, history and that elusive thing we call truth.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    In exalting the very worst of humanity, Bones displays a special glee and an unusual density of scary imagery.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Terminally whimsical, it generates a steady current of humor, much of it off-color.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Jesus Camp doesn't pretend to be a comprehensive survey of the charismatic-evangelical phenomenon. It offers no history or sociology and only scattered statistics about its growth. It analyzes the political agenda only glancingly, centering on abortion but not on homosexuality or other items.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    If you love to hate the superrich, The Valet, a delectable comedy in which the great French actor Daniel Auteuil portrays a piggy billionaire industrialist facing his comeuppance, is a sinfully delicious bonbon.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Gigantic has the informal tone and structure of an illustrated scrapbook with excerpts from concert and television performances interwoven with lighthearted testimonials by friends, supporters, collaborators and admirers and augmented by witty animated segments.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Besides Ms. Linney’s excellent performance and Mr. Hopkins’s good one, the best things about the movie are its sensuous cinematography by Javier Aguirresarobe (“Talk to Her,” “Vicky Cristina Barcelona”) and a gorgeous soundtrack.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Ultimately, A Silent Love transcends its problem-play situation to ponder how the best laid plans for an arranged marriage are no match against the vicissitudes of passion in a romantically besotted culture.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Almost a textbook example of what can go wrong when an artistic bad boy decides to be good.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Bomb the System, which rides on a subtle hip-hop soundtrack, might be described as soulful pulp; cult recognition awaits it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Sustains a lovely balance between enchantment and playfulness.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Much more effective at evoking a paranoid mood than at telling a coherent story, and the jerky action sequences are among the film's weaker visual elements.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The movie, which is crudely dubbed into English, lacks the raucous, anything-for-a-shock carnival humor of its American prototypes. After it's over, the only question worth asking is whether dear, cozy old Heidelberg can survive the slander.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    As this cautious, politically evenhanded movie grinds along like clockwork, the fuse that should spark an emotional explosion fizzles after some sporadic hisses and sputters.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A more accurate name for Feast of Love might be “Feast of Breasts.” At every opportunity, Mr. Benton turns the camera on his actresses’ gleaming torsos. These beautifully lighted soft-core teases lend an erotic frisson to a movie that in most other ways feels enervated.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    These characters are fully alive. But the movie attaches them to a conventional, not to say creaky, hip-meets-square drama.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Watching the first half-hour of Tooth Fairy is like reaching into a grab bag of novelties, as the movie unveils its tricks... After that, the wit more or less evaporates, replaced by bloated sentimentality and clumsy plot exposition.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    For all the earth shaking that goes on, “Percy Jackson” is agreeably tame and unthreatening.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    May be an expertly manipulated exercise in psychological horror, but that's all it is. Don't look for the kind of metaphoric weight you'd find in a movie by David Lynch or David Fincher.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Fallen Angels certainly abounds in visual pizazz, clever in jokes and trendy pop references, but such things can carry a movie only so far.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    So lazy and slipshod it confuses the mere flashing of kinky soft-core imagery with naughty fun.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Best approached as an admiring portrait of a likable, creative powerhouse at midcareer. No disapproving voices interrupt the stream of praise for his politics and his art. Mr. Kushner’s place in the history of American theater and in American culture, in general, is left unexamined. These are subjects well worth exploring in another, deeper film.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Far from a future cult classic, it turns out to be smarter and more diabolical than you could have guessed at the beginning.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    The moment the movie loses its lighthearted spirit is the moment it loses touch with reality
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Slick and treacherous.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Impenetrable mess of a movie.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Here, as in so many other documentaries about troubled musicians, the word genius is casually tossed around. But does every unstable, self-destructive artist defiantly living on the edge qualify for that description? In Van Zandt's case, maybe yes.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    My Fellow Americans, doesn't get to the heart of any issue, constitutional, legislative or otherwise. But it has a fine time imagining our leaders as bumbling, thin-skinned, ultimately likable misfits who are as lost on the American highway as everybody else.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A mechanically efficient chase-by-numbers movie.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Offering few laughs and a climactic scene of breathtaking cruelty, this plot-heavy movie, directed by Nick Hurran from a screenplay by Melissa Carter and Elisa Bell, draws you into its malignant force field against your will.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    It all makes for a poignant mix, the boy inside the man, pressing his nose against the glass, longing for the journalistic authenticity of someone like Burrows while still believing in Lassie and the unconditional love of True.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Certainly not the first film to show how a crushing urban environment can make a sensible-sounding antidrug slogan like "just say no" seem like so much nonsense, but it's one of the strongest.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Like a deathbed dream it leapfrogs through Arenas's life, reconstructing crucial moments as a succession of bright, feverish illuminations.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    An admiring portrait of the Silver Belles, a troupe of veteran Harlem tap dancers between the ages of 84 and 96, is a valuable historical document and a useful how-to movie about making the most of old age.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Though it includes some moderately funny snippets of actual performances, Wild West Comedy Show is not a concert film. We never see a complete performance or even a quarter of one.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    Although the concept seems promising enough, it is undone by disastrous casting decisions and an utter lack of ensemble unity.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    As tightly plotted as a standard French farce.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Stylistically brash, pulsing with life.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Think of it as a kind of “Twilight Zone 2007” in which the paranoia endemic to an industry that runs on illusion, hype and extravagant grandiosity comes home to roost.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The story is so schematically histrionic that the bringing in of the Holocaust late in the day feels exploitative and unearned. Gloomy Sunday is an oddity that takes itself much too seriously.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    However persuasively acted, this mélange of cinéma vérité, slapstick and murder - whose story has a lot in common with the recent Australian gangster film "Animal Kingdom" - has too many narrative gaps for its pieces to cohere satisfactorily.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    As much as you admire the stagecraft and the technical skills on display, when all is said and done, that's all it is: a fancy, not-quite-two-hour stunt.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    With such plodding dialogue, there's little the actors can do to surmount the falsity, although Ms. Shaw, in her brief appearances, almost succeeds.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Such an accomplished piece of filmmaking that it interweaves enough characters and themes to fill three movies.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Its message is quite simple and all too familiar: when it comes to sex, all men are little boys.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    This multigenerational family history has enough gripping moments to hold your attention, but ultimately it leaves you frustrated by its failure to braid subplots and characters into a gripping narrative.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    An illustrated civics lesson that strains to make its complicated, shadowy subject - electoral redistricting - a political hot topic.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Too lazy and too loosely structured to accomplish much besides conveying some vivid physical impressions. There is no narrator, and the structure that exists is clouded by the new-age mumbo-jumbo of eight principal commentators.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    A witty, sociologically astute reflection on the attraction between opposites.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Ultimately as sycophantic as it is needling.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    So sensitively acted you can almost buy its premise that love (in this case, neighborly affection and dependence) might rewire sexuality.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Delicate, bittersweet comedy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Where most movies portraying sociopathic behavior make some attempt at psychological explanation, Butterfly Kiss offers no background to Eunice's craziness. As she throws herself furiously through a bleak highway landscape of anonymous gas stations and convenience stores, she appears to be a self-created avenging demon radiating a powerful but loopy charisma.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A werewolf movie masquerading as a thriller, it looks like a canny attempt by Bruce A. Evans, its director and screenwriter (with Raynold Gideon), to establish a "Saw"-like franchise using the names of fading ’80s stars to lend the project a semblance of respectability.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The movie should have been a steadily escalating rampage that results in outrageous property damage. Instead, it wastes too much of its time developing the cardboard characters of the hotel manager, Robert (Jason Alexander), and his two mischievous sons, Kyle (Eric Lloyd) and Brian (Graham Sack).
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    The elegantly structured documentary weaves extensive footage of Mr. Bachardy rummaging through their house and reminiscing with readings from Isherwood's diaries by Michael York, old interviews with Isherwood, home movies of their travels and glamorous social life, and commentary by friends, including Leslie Caron and the British filmmaker John Boorman.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    As a female vocal duo, their performances are passable, if a little dull and lacking in any sense of camp exaggeration.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie may be a conventional story of police corruption, temptation and conflicting loyalties, but it never loses its smarts.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Acted with enough zest by its cast to give these not especially endearing people a poignant human dimension.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    For the most part, Paul Laverty's screenplay and the strong, naturalistic performances lend it a specificity that sets it apart.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Transcendently dumb but very funny comedy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    With its tentative pace, fussy, pieced-together structure and stuffy emotional climate, The White Countess never develops any narrative stamina.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    More acutely than any movie before, it gives cinematic expression to the hot-tempered, defiantly nihilistic ethos that ignites gangster rap.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    You are left with the feeling that its excesses notwithstanding, it knows its chosen terrain.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Begins with such a flurry of promise that it comes as a sharp disappointment when this drug-rehab comedy skids out of control.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A mildly diverting period heist movie.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Vanity Fair has a deeper conceptual confusion. In mixing satire and romance, the movie proves once again that the two are about as compatible as lemon juice and heavy cream.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Had it had the concision and symmetry of a classic French farce, Après Vous could have been an irresistible laugh machine.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Only twice does the film give a tantalizing glimpse at the personality behind the voice.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie offers a revealing case study of the relationship between politics, celebrity and the media in today’s polarized social climate.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As a personality study Imelda is a devastating portrait of how power begets self-delusion. It must be said, however, that through it all Mrs. Marcos exudes considerable charm and even a flickering sense of humor.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The film fails to convey the claustrophobic terror experienced by a man who called his book "Letters From Hell."
    • 40 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Throughout Happy Hour, observations that mean next to nothing are presented as nuggets of profound enlightenment.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    It strings along its joke just long enough to keep from wearing out its welcome.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Although the early scenes hold out some promise...the movie quickly runs out of ideas.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Despite its hip, off-center style and pointed de-glamorization of its singles, the movie adds up to little more than feel-good fluff.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The bits of Aboriginal lore imparted along the way by Tadpole add flavoring to a sugar-coated romp that has the craft of a high school revue.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 0 Stephen Holden
    No doubt there are those who will deem Simon Birch ''heartwarming.'' It is exactly the kind of movie that has given that hackneyed superlative a bad name.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    One of the most accomplished recent films about a non-European immigrant coming to the United States.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Although the odds are against them, Mr. Gazzara and Ms. Moreno succeed in cutting through the forced sitcom banter to create a credible and touching portrait of a marriage of two proud individuals who respect each other even in moments of strife.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Buscemi wrote and starred in the small gem of a movie ("Trees Lounge"), which had more psychological nuance than this emotionally cauterized slice of minimalist malaise.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    It's a striking measure of the nervousness of the country right now that a movie so full of holes should be as gripping as it is, at least for its first two-thirds, after which it collapses into a swamp of sentimental mush.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Too leisurely paced and visually drab for its own good, it succeeds in being only sporadically amusing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Max
    A historical fantasy connecting fact and wild supposition into a provocative work of fiction that poses ticklish questions about art and society.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The story has enough nasty twists and tantalizing clues for its ingenious mechanics to remain engaging.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    This opulent movie, with gorgeous rainbow animation, is heavy on message but light on humor.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The film's most weirdly beautiful moments are its excerpts from Bowery's collaborations with the Michael Clark Dance Company.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A good-natured screwball road film.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    A film that desperately wants to be a music video circa 1983.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Content to go only a third of the way to the bottom of its characters, the movie gives each a few comic tics and leaves it at that.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The screwball aging diva genre isn't the only formula guiding this stubbornly old-fashioned movie. Driving Lessons belongs to the silly feel-good mode of "The Full Monty," "Calendar Girls," "Billy Elliot," "Kinky Boots" and dozens of other celebrations of Britons defying convention to become "free," whatever that means.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A noirish thriller that revels in ominous visual moods, deepened by Cliff Martinez's spare, shivering guitar score, this heartland "Appointment in Samarra" is a mind-teaser that speaks the flat, evasive language of its seedy characters.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Yes, Heartbreaker is diverting, intermittently charming and occasionally funny, but it is also a jumble of jammed-together notions. Unevenly paced, it goes on too many tangents to cohere as a persuasive comic fable about love and money.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Sustains a perfect balance of pathos, humor and a clear-headed realism. One tiny misstep, and it could have tumbled into an abyss of tears.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    May be humorless, paranoid nonsense, but its biggest failure is its inability to scare.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    As anyone who remembers "JFK," his 1991 film about the Kennedy assassination, can attest, Mr. Stone has his own paranoid tendencies, but they are muted in this provocative, if shallow, exaltation of Latin American socialism.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Eddie Miller (Robert Forster), the stolid protagonist of Diamond Men, a small, finely acted slice of American life, is the sort of character the movies normally shun like the plague for lack of glamour.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    This contemporary sex farce, directed by Jeff Pollack, has the attention span of a hyperactive child, but its bawdy sexual humor rarely flags.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    A magnificent conjuring act, an eerie historical mirage.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A movie that rings emotionally true, despite structural contrivances and dim, washed-out color.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The schmaltzy sports movie Legendary is a kind of contemporary answer to the old Charles Atlas ad in which a 97-pound weakling develops muscles and triumphantly punches out the bully at the beach.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    If the title "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" didn’' already belong to Hunter S. Thompson, it would perfectly fit Peter Tolan's viciously funny satire, Finding Amanda.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    What hip means in this uneven comic suspense film is maintaining the ironically distanced tone of a deadpan ''Married to the Mob'' or a tongue-in-cheek Coen Brothers caper.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Junebug envelops us in texture of a world the movies rarely visit.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The product is so synthetic it has only attitude where its heart ought to be.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Much more than a perfectly realized vignette about seduction. It is the latest and most powerful dispatch yet from Ms. Breillat, France's most impassioned correspondent covering the war between the sexes.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    A breezy, informal history of the Black Bear Ranch, a long-running California commune begun in the summer of 1968 and still in existence, offers the fascinating spectacle of observing people then and now.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The other alumni, played by Malin Akerman, Adam Brody, Jeremy Strong and Rebecca Lawrence, are given such short shrift that they come across more as sarcastic commentators than as characters.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The movie’s confident performances and its eye and ear for detail make The Good Guy a satisfying insider’s snapshot of a shark tank.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    If the movie, which uses blues-based Kansas City jazz as a raucous, nonverbal Greek chorus, lacks the emotional range of Mr. Altman's masterpiece, ''Nashville,'' it still has its own brawling vitality.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The characters never transcend the clichés embedded in the culture since "The Godfather."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The movie’s sense of time is as vague as Ezra’s perception of it. Chaos is all he knows. Making Ezra even harder to follow, and undermining its authenticity, is the fact that its mostly African cast speaks in a heavily accented English. Mr. Kamara’s glowering lead performance, however, is riveting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    An agreeable show business satire with a warm heart.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Gathers riveting, rarely seen news clips from the era into a chronology that plays like a suspenseful police drama.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Because federal indictments for conspiracy to murder have yet to be handed down, the documentary is necessarily discreet about naming names and detailing its evidence. A sequel would go a long way toward solving the documentary's many unanswered questions.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    No matter how serious it becomes, however, La Moustache never forsakes an underlying attitude of high-style playfulness that recalls Hitchcock's cat-and-mouse romantic thrillers.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    Why Mr. Foxx, who was so impressive in "Any Given Sunday," chose to make a movie so boring and idiotic that it barely meets minimal standards of lowest- common-denominator entertainment.
    • 1 Metascore
    • 0 Stephen Holden
    Thoroughly incoherent... A dreary fizzle. [12 Jan 1996, p.C12]
    • The New York Times
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    At the end, Bear Cub does have a brush with sentimentality. But by then, its integrity and low-key truthfulness has been certified in a dozen different ways.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    One reason the film version of Terrence McNally's play Love! Valour! Compassion! is so moving is that this complicated group portrait never loses its slippery emotional footing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Draws a curtain over her intimate personal life.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The film can't seem to make up its mind whether it wants to be a comedy, a fantasy or an adventure film. Mr. Kingsley's villain gnashes his teeth and snorts, I love being the bad guy. Those who displease him are threatened with the tearing out of a heart or liver. The character ends up being neither scary nor funny, while the boys are so busy demonstrating their superhuman skills that no personalities emerge.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Once the movie throws in a jolting, late-in-the-gameplot twist that could have been borrowed from "City of Angels," it never regains its balance.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Holden
    If there's one movie that ought to be studied by military and civilian leaders around the world at this treacherous historical moment, it is The Fog of War, Errol Morris's sober, beautifully edited documentary portrait of the former United States defense secretary Robert S. McNamara.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Expressive touches are finally inadequate. Ms. Huppert's hard work notwithstanding, they don't take the place of psychological texture and narrative weight.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Recovery time is recommended after seeing Gardens of the Night, a harrowing, obliquely told story of kidnapping and forced child prostitution that conjures a world entirely populated by predators and prey.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Keeps its claws carefully retracted. That's probably for the best, since the documentary still leaves a bitter aftertaste.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    This sentimental but riveting film has no qualms about playing on our emotions.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A fake documentary that barely lets on that its fiction, this devilishly clever film tells the story of conjoined twins who create a minor sensation in Britain on the eve of punk rock.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Sparked by the actors' powerful performances, Arnold's moral absolutism and Furtwängler's lofty aestheticism make for a dramatically compelling clash.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Without standing on a soapbox Stephanie Daley suggests a tragic gender gap between men who judge and women who feel.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A leaden, skimpily plotted space-age Outward Bound adventure with vague allegorical aspirations that remain entirely unrealized.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    It's enough to say that the bland romantic comedy Life as We Know It, in which there is not a single deviation from formula, is well made for its corporate type.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A great big juicy gob of apocalyptic paranoia.

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