Steve Macfarlane

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For 93 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 31% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steve Macfarlane's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Level Five
Lowest review score: 0 Third Person
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 50 out of 93
  2. Negative: 26 out of 93
93 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Steve Macfarlane
    Level Five pictorializes the cruel moment when curiosity encounters tragedy, and the all-too-human abandonment of interest that can follows.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Steve Macfarlane
    Cinema is a vernacular of domination, and quaking with revelations both formal and personal, the film attests that Godard has spent his career apologizing for it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    Costa's storytelling is illusory at best, but Horse Money's self-contradictions are communicated not via plot half as much as in scenography, even in the costuming.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    Private Property abounds in inventive low-budget filmmaking while stress-testing a pulpy, dime-store premise.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    The film buzzes with hand-drawn creativity that's precious in both the pop-cultural and material senses.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    A barbed inquiry into this particular notion of "self-defense," enabled by the quotidian racism state and perpetuated de jure by the state.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    Johanna Hamilton's 1971 represents a mind-blowing scoop disguised as a fairly garden-variety issue doc.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    A magnificently quizzical diagram of two ceaselessly inquiring minds in perfect tandem, like a raw X-ray of atomized creativity.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    Between their wildly different bodies of work, a shared appeal emerges: to stop, look, listen, and consider not just what's in front of you, but also where it came from and where it might be going.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    A film for those who, whether here or in Israel, believe the law is the beginning, and not the end, of rights discourse.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    The Treasure is no thriller, but there are moments here that inculcate the stakes with prisoner's-dilemma paranoia.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    It's as unsparing a sketch of twentysomething life in New York City as American independent cinema has yet offered.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    As with Selma, filmmaker Ava DuVernay has fashioned a work of pummeling and clear-eyed intelligence.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    The film is no tearjerker, but it makes the stage play's hidebound, soul-baring pleasures mesmerizing on screen, and without copping to reductivism.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    The film lays bare that the franchise's most radical asset is also its most conservative: an overriding emphasis on, above all else, the on-screen family.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    The film dares its viewers to consider that--for a couple of hours, at least--even when a thing seems too good to be true, it might not be.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    By putting so much weight on his characters' speech, Alex Ross Perry's is an approach with honestly few contemporaries in American independent film.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    Whatever your foreknowledge of low-budget Brooklyn dramedies, it's impossible that Gillian Robespierre's film won't lob you at least a few curveballs.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    What intrigues, if in a lurid sort of way, is the film's fudging of projected viewer desires with its characters'.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    The film is knowingly sarcastic in its self-awareness without falling back on the gawky meta-squealing of its American rom-com counterparts.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    Every substrata of music geekdom deserves a period piece as intimate as Eden, Mia Hansen-Løve's swan song for the golden era of French house music.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    What will make the film essential for future generations isn't mere flashpoint topicality, but the way it aligns an old struggle with a current one.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    While the trivia value may feel tremendous, only One9's interviews with Nas, his father, Olu Dara, and his brother, Jungle, manage to make the doc legitimately moving--a history lesson in popular culture.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    Without a frame of footage nor a single interview presented from outside the camp, the documentary shows a capitalist nightmare that accords its victims zero wiggle room.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    Robert Pattinson's stare is almost thousand-yard enough to make the film's sense of tragedy feel downright Greek.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    Ciro Guerra's excesses in arthouse symmetry tend to arrive in the service of a just and angry correctivism.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    The series is both a testimonial to the vagaries of chance and an endlessly cyclical study into the implications of being studied.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    The film feels utterly infatuated by the cop/crook dividing line long-since drawn, if not flogged, by Michael Mann.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    Mike Mills’s 20th Century Women incurs sorrow at the prospect of saying goodbye to its characters.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    Mud
    The film ultimately succeeds thanks to small details, from its deep-fried lingo and the swampy texture of its location photography to its uniformly expert cast.

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