Steve Macfarlane
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For 65 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 26% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 70% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steve Macfarlane's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Level Five
Lowest review score: 0 Third Person
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 30 out of 65
  2. Negative: 22 out of 65
65 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Steve Macfarlane
    Level Five pictorializes the cruel moment when curiosity encounters tragedy, and the all-too-human abandonment of interest that can follows.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Steve Macfarlane
    Cinema is a vernacular of domination, and quaking with revelations both formal and personal, the film attests that Godard has spent his career apologizing for it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    A film for those who, whether here or in Israel, believe the law is the beginning, and not the end, of rights discourse.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    A magnificently quizzical diagram of two ceaselessly inquiring minds in perfect tandem, like a raw X-ray of atomized creativity.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    Between their wildly different bodies of work, a shared appeal emerges: to stop, look, listen, and consider not just what's in front of you, but also where it came from and where it might be going.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    Costa's storytelling is illusory at best, but Horse Money's self-contradictions are communicated not via plot half as much as in scenography, even in the costuming.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    The film is no tearjerker, but it makes the stage play's hidebound, soul-baring pleasures mesmerizing on screen, and without copping to reductivism.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    The series is both a testimonial to the vagaries of chance and an endlessly cyclical study into the implications of being studied.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    Mud
    The film ultimately succeeds thanks to small details, from its deep-fried lingo and the swampy texture of its location photography to its uniformly expert cast.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    The film is knowingly sarcastic in its self-awareness without falling back on the gawky meta-squealing of its American rom-com counterparts.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    Whatever your foreknowledge of low-budget Brooklyn dramedies, it's impossible that Gillian Robespierre's film won't lob you at least a few curveballs.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    What first feels like a neurotic avoidance of Sol LeWitt the man instead becomes a kind of mirage of his life, as though he managed to evaporate into his body of work.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    Robert Pattinson's stare is almost thousand-yard enough to make the film's sense of tragedy feel downright Greek.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    This is a summer blockbuster contingent on grand bargains, tactical retreats, and a ferocious, inevitable shock-and-awe campaign.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    Without a frame of footage nor a single interview presented from outside the camp, the documentary shows a capitalist nightmare that accords its victims zero wiggle room.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    While the trivia value may feel tremendous, only One9's interviews with Nas, his father, Olu Dara, and his brother, Jungle, manage to make the doc legitimately moving--a history lesson in popular culture.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    By putting so much weight on his characters' speech, Alex Ross Perry's is an approach with honestly few contemporaries in American independent film.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    What will make the film essential for future generations isn't mere flashpoint topicality, but the way it aligns an old struggle with a current one.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    A dazzling heist film that can't help but come off as duly influenced by Steven Soderbergh's Ocean's trilogy, South Korea's number one box-office champ of all time is never less than clever.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    The filmmakers spend vastly more time chronicling bigoted remarks from Romanians about gypsy life than they do actual gypsy life, so a minor crisis of perspective hangs over Our School.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    With My Brother the Devil, writer-director Sally El Hosaini tells a story both operatic in its implications and quotidian in its sensory, day-to-day details.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    Dorothy Vogel is less the soft-spoken housewife from the first film than a businesswoman both shrewd and mousy, and her trajectory affords the film its closest semblance to a story.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    Even if the film never transcends its subject matter, Jonathan Demme's light touch adds up to a charming portrait, only rarely fumbling into hagiography.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    Costa-Gavras's new film is more a funhouse-mirror panegyric (albeit on an exhausted topic) than the staid thriller promised by its press materials.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    Kevin Hart turns an essentially crude wingman into the conscience of the film's torturous, nettled discourse on romance.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    Not unlike Michael Peña's prior supporting roles, Chavez is marked by an explosive anger kept under a cherubic, sweet-natured mask, providing the surprise lacking in the story's text.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    The script is perspicacious in making Henrik's bad choices understandable enough emotionally, but also nudges the audience toward wishing the man would wise up.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    Opting for scenes that tend to be fragmented, flawed snippets from a much bigger story, the film exudes a bizarre confidence in not trying to encapsulate the singer's whole life in 120 minutes.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    To Keira Knightley's credit, she's all too willing to undercut her pretty-girl reputation by looking and acting a fool for Lynn Shelton's camera.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    It shrugs off the bigger questions about Iranian politics its first half appears to raise, falling back instead on a gestalt of the eternal, Kafkaesque regime, wherever the viewer may find it.

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