For 17 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steve Sonsky's Scores

  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Wonder Years: Season 1
Lowest review score: 10 Full House: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 17
  2. Negative: 3 out of 17
17 tv reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Steve Sonsky
    The Wonder Years is full of wonderment -- and grace, and charm, and wit, and insight, and poignancy and humor. The Wonder Years, in a word, is wonderful. [15 March 1988, p.1]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Steve Sonsky
    This is the likely big hit of the '88-'89 strike-delayed season, the show everyone will copy next year. [17 Oct 1988]
    • 54 Metascore
    • 90 Steve Sonsky
    May be the most outrageous new comedy since "All in the Family," in terms of what it's willing to try and say. It's going to make some people laugh. It's going to offend some people...For my money, it's the best and brightest new sitcom of the year -- sharp and tart in its writing, sharp and tart in its execution by four splendid actresses. They, and it, have got spirit and style and sass. [29 Sept 1986, p.C1]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Steve Sonsky
    It's very, very funny. ... The ingredients are all here (neat star, clever writing, a talented, well-defined supporting ensemble) for a classy comedy hit in the Cheers or Mary Tyler Moore Show mold. [14 Nov 1988]
    • 56 Metascore
    • 90 Steve Sonsky
    It's a simple idea with deceptively intriguing permutations. Plus, it's extremely well- made, to boot -- if, occasionally, inevitably, cliche-crazed. But hey -- it is TV. [16 Sept 1987, p.D1]
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Steve Sonsky
    But I think the biggest reason is that I like its star, the British actor Woodward, who is an older man, 55, a veteran actor of 40 years, and not just another pretty young face on a vacuous head. He gives this show the same touch of class that another British export, Patrick Macnee, used to give The Avengers. [18 Sept 1985, p.3]
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Steve Sonsky
    Re-visiting Star Trek on television holds the same nostalgic, socko appeal that the boffo-box-office movies do. I didn't miss Kirk, Spock and friends. [28 Sep 1987]
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Steve Sonsky
    Credit is due here for crafting a show in which the relationships are at least as important as the chase scenes. [20 Sep 1985]
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Steve Sonsky
    The China Beach premiere has its ups and downs. The downs are mostly in its too pat and predictable dramatic choices. It takes the easy road too often in its resolutions. Its bag of storytelling tricks is trite, undermining a greater potential that might have been tapped with less telegraphed, less easy calls. But there is much to admire as well. The acting and characterizations are uniformly splendid. [26 Apr 1988]
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Steve Sonsky
    When [Uecker] and Hewett trade barbs, they elevate the material far beyond the way it would read on the printed page. Down the line, however, for this show to sustain, the writing and the plotting will have to show a bit more originality and flash than it does tonight. [15 Mar 1985]
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Steve Sonsky
    Like the people whose story it tells -- those bright, over- educated, social-climbing, New York killer careerists and consumerists (I'm avoiding the dreaded Y-word here) -- Baby Boom is affected, but stylish. Like its subjects, it can be annoying with its display of superficial trappings like a designer kitchen. But once the veneer is stripped away, the show -- and its main character, J.C. Wiatt (the reliably engaging Jackson) -- can be rather pleasant. [10 Sept 1998, p.B1]
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Steve Sonsky
    It's warm and funny, has a pleasant dose of the fantastic, and even manages to throw in a few life lessons along the way, in a manner not nearly as ham- fisted or homily-heavy as shows like Highway to Heaven and Wizard. [19 Sept 1986, p.B1]
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Sonsky
    The TV show seems fairly faithful to the formula: trite, sappy and predictable, if somewhat sweet and nicely filmed. [29 Oct 1988, p.C1]
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Sonsky
    It was all quite boring...What the series does have going for it is a nostalgic sense of humor and Bakula, whom some may recall from Eisenhower and Lutz, a midseason show that lasted about 10 minutes last spring. Bakula has this hound-dog kind of handsomeness and a certain goofy charm...What it has going against it, is its sheer nutty illogic. Even science fiction is supposed to have some ground rules. God? Holograms? Amnesia? Come on! This thing is just nonsense.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Steve Sonsky
    The problem with Matlock is that Griffith isn't nearly as cute as either he, or NBC, think he is. Or maybe it's that he's playing it too cute. When Peter Falk played cat and mouse with his prey in that eccentric, unassuming manner, it was charming. When Griffith does it, he just seems phony, manipulative and obnoxious. He's more creepy than he is endearing. [23 Sept 1986, p.C6]
    • 45 Metascore
    • 20 Steve Sonsky
    Think of TV's Stir Crazy as only a slightly more sophisticated Dukes of Hazzard. ... If you really need this kind of "comedy" fix, my recommendation is to rent the movie once a week and watch it until the series is canceled. [17 Sep 1985]
    • 31 Metascore
    • 10 Steve Sonsky
    Full House is your standard-issue, cheap-laugh, bankrupt- of-new-ideas, claustrophobic, one-note-samba sitcom. It's enough to make you wish "Webster" were back. For provoking that sentiment alone, it should be razed. [22 Sept 1987, p.C1]