For 1,951 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Amour
Lowest review score: 0 Isn't She Great
Score distribution:
1951 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    As for the scary business - it is, indeed, scary, delivered with an intensity that will make you think twice the next time you find yourself driving alone, or opening a closet door when no one else happens to be around.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Has two or three booming and intense action sequences that may leave the littlest audience members more quaking than charmed. But the notion of having a pet dragon - just like a pet whale, or a pet lion - is a scenario that should appeal to children of all ages.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A fascinating, albeit self-congratulatory, account of how Disney's fabled animation department was reenergized and reimagined between 1984 and 1994.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Warlords, ultimately, tries to speak to the futility of war - but it does so by staging one gargantuan dustup after another.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Offers a worshipful but insightful portrait of the group - centered, of course, on its charismatic front man.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Cartel does what good reporters are supposed to do: follow the money.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Although The Secret in Their Eyes has neither the power, the artistry, nor the electric energy of its fellow Oscar nominee, France's "A Prophet," the Argentine film nonetheless engages with style, suspense, and seriousness of intent. Criminal intent and otherwise.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The music is symphonic, the cinematography spectacular, the narration — ay, there's the rub. In Oceans, the latest Disney nature documentary, the voice-over almost manages to turn the majestic into the mundane. Almost.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Scott's reimagining of the legend of Robin Hood has more heft than it does humor, more soulful brooding than snappy thrust-and-parry retorts.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Michael Elliot, the Philadelphia native who wrote Just Wright as a vehicle for Latifah - and who was on set for most of the shoot - says that Common's earnestness, and eagerness, and his sense of responsibility in carrying the movie, were palpable.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The contrast in lifestyles is striking, and I suppose one of the themes that Babies is trying to get at is that despite chasm-wide economic and societal differences, infants are really all the same.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    As entertaining as it is exasperating.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Diaz works that trademark mix of ditziness, sexiness, and brassiness.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In the engaging Looking for Eric, Loach, the master of British kitchen sink social drama - tries a bit of imaginary whimsy.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    "Lousy times make lousy people," someone opines, and maybe that's the point Romero's trying to drive home.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Gripping, sobering, inspiring stuff.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Offers two hours of luxury and loveliness, music and art, and a bit of sexually charged madness, too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In a sense, Everyone Else traces, over a stretch of days on the sunny Mediterranean, the whole trajectory of a relationship. It's a marriage in miniature: courtship, consummation, conflict; love and hate; the longing for freedom vs. the need for companionship.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Dinner for Schmucks goes up in flames. Amusingly, perhaps -- but creatively, too.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This is no-nonsense, let's-get-to-it business, and will probably be less satisfying, and less clear, to viewers unfamiliar with the source material.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The period details - the cars, the clothes, the old storefronts along Main Street - are attentively described. But it's Duvall, spooky, sly, and sad, who makes all the props and the plot twists seem real.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Thanks to the evocative cinematography of Ed Lachman, it is bathed in a celestial light that cannot penetrate the existential darkness of its characters.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The real-life career criminal Jacques Mesrine is seen in all his wild, scary, violent glory.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Deftly filmed and directed by Jean-François Richet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Zany screwball farce.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Pretty magical.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Affleck is more interested in the people in the midst of the action than he is in the action itself, and that gives this accomplished genre piece considerable and compelling depth.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Catfish, made on the cheap with digital video, cell-phone cams, and hidden mikes, raises all sorts of questions - about the imaginary realms that open when you click on your computer screen, about cyber-stalking, but also about journalistic ethics.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Freakonomics is uneven, and even a little cloying, but its sum effect isn't bad.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a noble enterprise, and a remarkable story, but it's not a movie that will set you free.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Mostly, Doremus' movie rings true, as some truly jerky behavior ensues.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Watts gives a deep and Oscar-worthy performance here, displaying the steely composure that made Plame a valued NOC (non-official cover operative).
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Next Three Days is genre fare - no pretensions, no nonsense.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Monsters, like a serpent eating its own tail, comes back on itself in ways that haunt, and hurt.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Megamind has momentum and dazzle.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    McGregor, playing his lover, is a perfect foil: gentle, funny, magnetic.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    All Good Things is a "true crime" drama with speculative scenarios and a kind of deliberately murky aura. It's a strange, thrilling tale begrimed by bad memories, by bad deeds.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This Santa Claus story is for a midnight movie crowd, not the kiddie matinees.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Ultimately, Somewhere may be too static, too minimalist a tale. But there's grace here.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An enjoyably trippy Japanese animated feature.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's all very Hitchcockian, at least for a while. And clever and exciting, too, even if the convergences begin to strain credulity, and, when you think about it, defy logic, too.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Even the Rain strikes a deep and resonant chord.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The same kind of keen, empathetic observations that made "The Station Agent" and "The Visitor" so illuminating are at play here, too.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Is Spurlock selling out by pulling off this stunt? Is he biting the hand that feeds him? Is he working both sides against the middle? And does he think JetBlue is the best airline in the world? You bet.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Tavernier pulls all this off with elegance and style; his battle scenes are tough and bloody, his châteaus grand.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Blissfully, brainlessly satisfying.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Hickernell's film aesthetic is straightforward, narrative-driven.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    I wanted to like Meek's Cutoff more than I did. Reichardt and her writer, Jonathan Raymond, bring a quiet, watchful sensibility to their work, allowing the actors room to reflect and riff. But the stilted language and rectitude of the times don't always mesh with the acting.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Director Jennifer Yuh Nelson, who oversaw the elegant title sequences from the first film, likewise gives Kung Fu Panda 2's series of flashbacks a different look, harking back to Chinese shadow puppetry and delicate watercolors. With its mix of vibrant CG and classical elements, the movie dazzles.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The real reason to see Blank City is to catch snatches of the now-decades-old films - priceless DIY numbers that capture all the wild energy, humor, and rage of, if not a more innocent time, then certainly a cooler one.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Before Trollhunter is done with, the truth about these fairy-tale creatures - they gnaw on trees and truck tires, can be turned to stone by exposure to light, and have something against people who believe in Christ - is revealed.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's not just the grainy stock and bad sound - technically, we've come a long way. It's the cheesy sex, the awkward edits, the hammy symbolism, the mix of art-house aesthetics and exploitation cliché. Strange creature, this is.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This is one of the smarter, more honest scripts to be filmed in quite some time. And Jenna Fischer, star of "The Office," gives one of the smarter, more honest - and vulnerable, and tough - performances by an actress on the big screen in an even longer stretch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Another Earth has heft - emotionally, intellectually.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A shamelessly fun B-movie with A-movie effects.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's the lysergic soap opera going on among Kesey, Neal Cassady, and various pals, scribes, spouses, and hangers-on piled onto the rainbow-hued school bus that's at the heart of this rollicking road pic.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    While this hugely likable cast is, indeed, hugely likable, no one's sweating things at all. The comedy's relaxed, moony rhythms imbue it with a certain charm, but can result in a certain stop-and-start awkwardness, too.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Despite the potential for some supernatural grandiosity, the tone here remains understated and quiet, and Gainsbourg's performance feels lived-in, and deep, and right.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    What the three pairs of actors lack in semblance (or resemblance), they make up for to a great extent in their performances.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    By the time this globe-hopping, movie-star-crammed disaster saga - directed with petrifying efficiency by Steven Soderbergh - comes full circle, you'll never want to touch a subway pole or elevator button or ATM again.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The two leads, Edgerton and Hardy, pull off their respective roles - rising above the cliches and the melodrama - with ferocity and focus.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A heartfelt project, scrappy and engaging, The Way has its way with audiences despite, not because of, its sentimental excess.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Watching Shepard work his pony down a snaking mountain pass, playing a mandolin and singing the blues, or seeing him sitting, stone-still, beneath a railroad water tank, waiting for something to happen - these are scenes to be cherished, from an actor who has found the soul of the character he's playing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Jazzy and colorful, full of men and women in swell clothes driving cool cars, The Rum Diary has a bit of a seedily exotic Graham Greene vibe, and Robinson moves things along at a nice, casual clip, even in the film's more overheated moments.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The music, of course, resonates. And so does this exquisite heartbreaker of a story.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In short, Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life is a charmer.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    No walk in the park, Tyrannosaur is a character study steeped in the British (and Irish) tradition of social realism, and the experience of watching this skillfully made film is, well, exhausting.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    What about the kids and families who have no connection to Méliès, little familiarity with Charlie Chaplin or Buster Keaton? Will Hugo keep them in their seats? I'm not sure.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    'As long as there are Muppets," muses a little felt guy named Walter, "there is still hope." And indeed, there is something hopeful about The Muppets - Disney's rollicking reboot of the late Jim Henson's furball franchise.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    And talk about transcendent parenting moments: When Lindberg's girls pull out their Barbies, the Pennywise singer goes and gets his Devo doll to play with them.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Has a certain cartoonish vibe. That's OK, because Brad Bird's brand of toonage (The Iron Giant, The Incredibles, Ratatouille) owes much to the rigors and traditions of live action, not only in the way he references other films, but also in his visual approach - sweeping, swooping camera pans, wide vistas, jolting perspective.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A pitch-black comedy steeped in bitterness and regret.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    And if there's a problem with Tintin, it's that it's too big and booming.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Spielberg and his team - composer John Williams, as always, cinematographer Janusz Kaminski, screenwriter Richard Curtis - never forget their mission: to pull at heart strings, jerk some tears.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Even if you get lost - in the spyspeak, in the codes, in the comings and goings of grim-faced men with satchels full of documents they should not have - Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is worth getting lost in.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Represents a brave undertaking on Jolie's part. It's impressively steady filmmaking for a first-timer, and a powerful, powerfully disturbing subject to take on.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    There's an icy chill, a detachment, to A Dangerous Method, too. Of course, there are no talking cockroaches (Naked Lunch), no naked steambath knife fights (Eastern Promises), and that may have something to do with why this all feels so un-Cronenbergian.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Yea or nay, love or hate, the portrait that Streep delivers in Phyllida Lloyd's impressionistic biopic is astonishing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Disarmingly laid back for this kind of fare, with a jazzy musical score (courtesy of David Holmes) and a sleek, straight-ahead style, Haywire may not make much sense plotwise, but it's a rollicking 90 minutes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Albert Nobbs is a quiet, minor-key work. The period finery is Masterpiece Classics-y, the parade of upper-crust and lower-tier eccentrics predictable. But Close's performance as this poor, wounded fellow resonates with depth and poignancy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    There are no good guys in Miss Bala, just bad guys of different stripes.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Safe House rockets along, taking a familiar formula and making it work - hard.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    By detailing the allegiance between Tutsi Muslims and Christian Hutus, and the fatwa issued by a Muslim leader forbidding his followers to participate in the massacres, the film is hopeful rather than horrific, even as it describes events of impossible savagery and hate.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Writing with her sister, Karen, Jill Sprecher rigs up an elaborate cause-and-effect comedy of errors, with Kinnear's predatory protagonist as both perp and victim. I won't say more than that, but Thin Ice is deeper than it first appears.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Undefeated is undeniably inspirational stuff.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The filmmaker, whose career took off with a very different sort of Holocaust film, 1990's Oscar-nominated "Europa Europa," understands that most of these stories arrive at a point of unspeakable, incomprehensible horror.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If all this sounds like too much whimsy to bear, be forwarned. There is whimsy everywhere.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Casa de Mi Padre is at its best (a relative term, mind you) when it's at its silliest and most surreal.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Nothing in this quiet, quirky comedy from the brothers Duplass comes close to Jeff's inspired, bong-fueled deconstruction of "Signs," but it gives us a good idea of where this guy is coming from.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Tautou, who looks even smaller and more fragile alongside her towering leading man, conveys the hurt and hesitancy that are pulling at her character's heart - and does so with seeming effortlessness. It's as though she knows this woman, deep down.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Boy
    Boy begins with an epigram from E.T.: "You could be happy here . . . . We could grow up together." That's what the film is about - finding happiness, growing up, feeling like a stranger in a strange world.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Marley celebrates the fact that its subject is still among us in the way that perhaps matters most: His music not only survives, it thrives.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's not impossible to address grown-up issues of commitment, of responsibility, of love, and have some fun, and some profanity, while you're at it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An economical thriller, both narratively and budgetarily, Sound of My Voice serves up moments of extreme dread and discomfort, but works a winning undercurrent of playful absurdity into the material as well.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Pinpointing the era - lovingly - is very much what Dark Shadows' has on its mind. While there's a tangle of romance and vengeance and all sorts of family matters to deal with, Burton's film is really about hippies in bell-bottoms, stoned out in their VW micro-buses.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Mixes its high and low comedy with surprising success.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A surprisingly fine, fantastic movie it is.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Hysteria is a romantic comedy, not an erotic one.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's about time: Aubrey Plaza gets her own movie!
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Satisfying and spirited and laced with humor.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Michelle Williams is a beautiful moper.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If you just give yourself over to Nolan's sweeping, symphonic Cowled Crusader saga, The Dark Knight Rises is, well, a blast.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Seydoux, no doubt best known for her kickboxing catfight with Paula Patton in "Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol," gives a quiet, watchful performance, suggesting fealty for her lady but also a strong independent streak.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's smart, it's exhilarating, and Gilroy's depiction of a high-tech world where our every move is captured by surveillance cams and Big Brother-types deploying the latest spyware feels authentic, and troubling.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Killer Joe is twisted pulp, and the actors chew on it bravely, boldly, and with varying degrees of success.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's an Alzheimer's allegory, full of humanity, heart, and humor.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A story of entrepreneurship, of family, of fighting for one's rights - the right to make white lightning, and money. It's as American as apple pie.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A Cat in Paris is thrilling, and a thrilling example of traditional ink and paint cartooning.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Amazingly, though, Brian Klugman and Lee Sternthal, cowriters and codirectors of The Words, have the audacity - and the skill sets - to pull this all off. They wrest emotional truth out of hokum. They also wrest intelligent, nuanced performances from their cast.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In the end, Arbitrage disappoints a bit. The writing isn't as sharp, or sophisticated, as it needs be. And the cynicism exhibited by Miller and the circle of traders and tycoons he moves in seeps into the fabric of the story itself.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Phoenix's performance is one of such wild, intense abandon that it is not to be believed, and this, in fact, was my problem as The Master sailed into its momentum-less second hour.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Deadpan and a bit dopey, Brooklyn Brothers Beat the Best has a shaggy charm, and the chemistry between the tuneful twosome's would-be Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty makes up for the inevitable rock-and-roll road movie cliches.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    There's enough here to entertain - and gross out - the kiddie crowd, and parental units, too
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Paperboy is over-the-top every which way you look.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A parablelike melodrama with obvious symbolic meaning.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Skyfall is certainly the most cultured Bond film to come along in some time. It's also the first of the three Craig endeavors to seriously (and wittily) acknowledge its pedigree.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Jessica Biel is Vera Miles, the star who had the nerve to get pregnant when Hitchcock wanted her for "Vertigo." He feels betrayed, and she feels relieved, consigned to a supporting role in Psycho as Marion's sister. And Toni Collette, in glasses and a dark wig, is Hitchcock's long-suffering secretary, Peggy. Both Biel and Collette are very good, engaging.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Starlet sneaks up on you. Set in the same sun-dried, strip-malled precincts of the San Fernando Valley where "Boogie Nights" took place - and set, in part, in that same porn industry milieu - Sean Baker's low-key, low-budget indie traces the relationship that develops between a young actress and an isolated, elderly woman.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In short, This Is 40, in tried and true Apatowian style, mixes weighty issues about intimacy and cohabitation with astute and smart-alecky pop culture references, crude bathroom jokes, stoner riffs, boob ogling, and existential angst.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If you love Les Mis the stage musical, my guess is you will love what Hooper and his bustling company have done. But when you hear "Master of the House" and you think of the Seinfeld episode with Elaine's gruff dad belting the tune before you think of those shifty innkeepers the Thénardiers, then you may want to steer clear of this grand endeavor.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Mostly, Not Fade Away is a hit.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Wahlberg does what Wahlberg does, bringing muscular conviction to his troubled, tough-guy role. The city may be broken, but the movie star's formula is working fine.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An effectively spooky ghost story with Guillermo del Toro's imprimatur (he's executive producer), Mama is every adoptive parent's nightmare: What if the children you bring home start eating moths and toilet paper, and won't come out from under the bed? And when they do, it's only to do something hurtful?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    And that, in the end, is what Quartet is about: determined engagement, embracing music and theater and the arts, and embracing the friends and loved ones you have around you.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An enjoyably clever and cartoonishly gory rom-zom-com.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    John Dies at the End isn't deep. But it is deeply amusing, in the sickest possible way.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A beautifully twisted, slow-burning psychothriller that may or may not all be taking place inside India's head.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Watts, who is one of the film's executive producers, brings a taut intelligence to the proceedings, but her character, like Roth's, is more archetype than actual person.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    On the Road is an honorable homage to the bennies-and-booze-and-bebop-driven hegiras undertaken by the fiercely dedicated anti-establishment duo. But in Salles, screenwriter Jose Rivera and company's effort to get the details right, they only get so far. And it's not quite far enough.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Based on reports of a real 2005 incident, it is a film that asks its viewer to consider the nature of good and evil, love and trust - and trust that turns into something like blind faith.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The pair are scrappy and smart and riff off each other like a no-budget, indie version of Tracy and Hepburn. It's impossible not to like them, and there's absolutely no reason not to.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    42
    42 doesn't shirk from showing how daunting it was for Robinson to turn the other cheek, as Ford's Rickey tells him he must do, in the face of the insults and hostility.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Directed in steady fashion by Redford, The Company You Keep manages to keep its multiple strands of plot - and the people caught in them - from collapsing in a jumble of confusion. This alone, given the whirl of personal and political history going on, is an accomplishment.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Brosnan is good, and he and Dyrholm erase any and all signs of contrivance in the plot, the script.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Out-of-control hilarious.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Forster and his team have also mastered the discreet edit, leaving a lot of the blood, gore, and zombie slime to the imagination. (It's still a pretty convincingly creepy affair.)
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Bling Ring is Sofia Coppola's energetic, elegant, and entertaining take on this real-life story - a comedy, of sorts, if what it says about our obsession with the famous and the frivolous weren't so totally depressing.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A wild, wacky, wide-screen reimagining of the vintage radio serial and TV series, the film - with Armie Hammer in the hat and mask, galloping across Texas righting wrongs, and Depp as his trusty Indian sidekick, Tonto - is an epic good time.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Pacific Rim shares much with the Mexican filmmaker's "Hellboy" franchise - jokey and comic book-y, full of muscular tableaus with huge squads of people coming and going (and running for their lives).
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Apart from Khodchenkova, who displays the acting acumen of a runway model and gives new meaning to the term Russian mole (she's the villainous vixen of the tale, suited up in high heels and slinky, scaly couture), the cast of The Wolverine is uniformly good.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The To Do List is sex-obsessed, to be sure, but it's a chick flick, too. And in what it says about women (or girls) and men (or boys) and what they want, maybe it's a movie for us all.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At a certain point, Bujalski - the mumblecore meister, gleefully pushing the envelope of credulity here - jettisons the mock-doc pretense for a Christopher Guest-like glimpse into a strange subculture of the everyday.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Hunt offers a powerful, provocative study of mob mentality and the fabric of trust.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Among the slew of recent futuristic hell-in-a-handbasket spectacles, Elysium takes the cake.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The scene when she's (Blanchette) babysitting Ginger's boys and takes them to a diner - and confides about her electric shock treatments ("Edison's medicine"), her breakdowns, about the side effects of Prozac and Lithium . . .. it's genius.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    For all its faults - and there are many, from shameless compression of events to milk the drama for all it's worth, to the gimmicky miscasting of several commanders-in-chief (Robin Williams as Eisenhower is especially egregious) - The Butler is an inspiring and important summation of the black struggle.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Spectacular Now feels genuine in almost every respect, from the unflashy cinematography and the sparingly deployed music cues to the natural, unhurried performances of its two stars. They will get to you, truly.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Smart, funny, and gross (often at the same time).
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Director John Crowley trots his crew around London, working up a suitable amount of suspense. And paranoia.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Populaire plays like a musical - you expect anyone, at any time, to break into song.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Don Jon is about a man's unwitting search for intimacy, for real connection in a world where everyone is connected - by social media, by the Internet, by TV and computer and smartphone screens. That's not exactly an original idea. But Gordon-Levitt goes at it with gusto, and style. Give the guy some props.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An epicurean dream where the dishes conjured up by the characters are as essential to the experience as the characters themselves.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If you're going to take another stab at this tale of a taunted, traumatized teen who exacts fiery revenge on, well, everyone, then Kimberly Peirce is the director to do it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Let the Fire Burn does not glorify MOVE. What it does do is force us to consider why and how this surreal event - a city bombing its own citizens, leaving innocent children dead - occurred. And ask, could something like it ever happen again?
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Kill Your Darlings is a tale of inspiration, then, but also a tale of jealousy, obsession, homophobia, and homicide. It's a whirlwind. Even if it doesn't all hang together, it's worth the ride.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Catching Fire is bigger, better and broodier than the first film.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Delivery Man, with its democratic band of half-siblings and its feel-good view of humankind, is what it is: a reproductive remake that will make you laugh. More than once or twice.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Cooper, who steered Jeff Bridges through his Oscar-winning turn in Crazy Heart, gets fiercely committed performances from just about everyone in Out of the Furnace.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    No manner of bizarre distraction can keep Anchorman's hapless hero from his mission: "I'm going to do what God put Ron Burgundy on this earth to do," he declares. "Have salon-quality hair and read the news!"
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Saving Mr. Banks, set in 1961, is smart, delightful.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A conventional biopic made anything but conventional by the magnitude of its subject's life and accomplishments, and by Idris Elba's imposing performance in the title role.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The momentum Stiller has built up - his character's globe-trotting derring-do, the care and consideration on display in his directing - carries the movie a long way. Falling short of fantastic, The Secret Life of Walter Mitty is still a fantasy to enjoy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The middle 40 minutes of Lone Survivor have to be some of the toughest battle scenes in Hollywood history - an epic, close-range firefight that finds the SEALs throwing themselves down rock faces like superheroes. Only they aren't superheroes - they bleed, they break.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Jones (Like Crazy) gives Nelly's tragic plight a palpable anguish. There is no doubt that Dickens - who was mad about theater, about acting, about inhabiting other lives onstage and in the pages of his books - was in love with Nelly.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    RoboCop is a solid near-future action pic that poses moral questions about artificial intelligence and remote-control combat systems without getting too preachy or ponderous about it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Bakri, a newcomer to acting, has presence and power. His intensity and determination become Omar's.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Has a cool, midcentury-modern look (dog and boy live in a populuxe Manhattan penthouse) and a voice cast that may not be A-list but fits the bill nicely.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's the cars, and the mega-horsepowered action, that matter most. With its driver-POV spinouts, wrong-way chases, and multilane median jumps, the movie is a roaring revel of an automotive fantasy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Darren Aronofsky's Noah is the Old Testament on acid. It's the movie equivalent of Christian death metal. It's an antediluvian Lord of the Rings, fist-pumping, ferocious, apocalyptic, and wet - very wet.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Joe
    This world feels studied in its "authenticity": the rusted GMC pickup, the tumbledown shack, the boozy brothel, and angry Joe Ransom guttin' deer and tending to his own gunshot wounds with a grimace and a bottle of alcohol.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Belle, with its country manors and its city slums, its snooty nobles and its fiery idealists, its ballroom dances and barroom conspiracies, brings these themes to a dramatic head: romance and race, privilege and justice.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Ambitious, even audacious, the movie's mix of action and for-devotees-only intrigue can overwhelm, but there are moments of sheer virtuosity, too.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Kafka-esque, Terry Gilliam-esque (Brazil), Charlie Kaufman-esque (remember Floor 71/2 in Being John Malkovich?), and David Lynch-ian, too, The Double plays like a nightmare that will leave you spooked, jittery, and confused. Well, that's how it plays for Simon, anyway. For everyone else, it should leave us simply amused.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Jolie's Maleficent is magnificent.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    They're not exactly Richard Linklater's "Before" trilogy, but French filmmaker Cédric Klapisch's "Spanish Apartment" movies - 2002's "L'Auberge Espagnole," 2005's "Russian Dolls," and now, Chinese Puzzle - have their devotees, too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At its best, Edge of Tomorrow plays like a tripwire time-travel thriller. As it progresses, though, the built-in repetition can, and does, grow tedious.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Maybe it's generational: In a movie about teens, it's the teens who should rule. And they do. With certainty. With laughter. And with tears - buckets and buckets.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Signal is a road movie turned upside down and inside out.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    What If boasts a couple of near-classic comic moments, one involving jalapeno peppers and a precipitous fall.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's all head-spinning and lovely - and a little exhausting, too.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Filmmaker Maria Sole Tognazzi is going for a quiet, thoughtful character study: a modern woman, sure of herself, but still trying to come to terms with her place in the world.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An efficient, if not exactly inspiring, espionage thriller, full of high-tech gadgetry (surveillance drones! flash drives!) and low-tech action (car chases! shootouts! a shovel to the head!).
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Trip to Italy doesn't feel entirely new, but there's comfort in familiarity, too. And as Brydon and Coogan note in one discourse, it's the rare sequel (The Godfather: Part II) that's better than its forebear.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A Summer's Tale is one of those movies where it looks like nothing is happening; there is a lot of walking and talking (against exquisite backdrops), dissections and discourse about the intricacies of romance, the false signals, the fickleness.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The film's conceit - mopey strangers meet, form a band, and take to the dance halls - has a Judy Garland/Mickey Rooney let's-put-on-a-show innocence, and exuberance.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Equalizer, which reteams Washington with his Training Day director, Fuqua, is an origin story, like the birth of Batman, or Daredevil. If audiences and star are so inclined, it's easy to see this premise and this character - a tough, taciturn gent burdened with regret and a very special skill set - going into Roman numerals.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a wondrous mix of the momentous and mundane, the profound and the perverse, with Cave blues-talking his way through the goofy juxtapositions, the darkness, and the light.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    That's something else Ridley and his actors do: make you appreciate what a life it was - impossibly short, impossibly brilliant.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If a movie with suicide as a central theme can be deemed funny, then writer/director Craig Johnson has pulled it off, mixing heartache and humor and giving Wiig, especially, the opportunity to shine.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    British screen stalwarts Bill Nighy and Imelda Staunton appear as locals - he twitchy and reticent, she chatty and full of cheer, both with their hearts in the right place.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Although it's pretty much impossible to avoid the cliches and constructs of a war movie, Ayer pushes his actors to find the adrenalized fear, and fire, in their guts. Pitt brings "Wardaddy" alive in ways that put his cartoonish "Inglourious Basterds" Army lieutenant to shame. Lerman's rabbity dread is palpable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Lieberher, a Philly native transplanted to L.A., is a reed-thin, wide-eyed wonder. There's none of that precocious Hollywood child-actor stuff going on; he's seriously thinking about what he has to say, assessing his words and their implications. It's rare to see any actor - let alone a novice, barely out of the single digits - so readily and naturally displaying inner thought in front of the camera.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Einsteinian, Kubrickian, Malickian, Steinbeckian - Interstellar, Christopher Nolan's epically ambitious space opera, is all that. And more. And, alas, less.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At a certain point, The Homesman will take you by surprise. By the end, a ferry ride across the Missouri River, it will take your heart.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    How much is shaman and how much is showman is hard to tell. Some of Levitch's staccato soliloquies have the ring of truth, and some have the ring of jive. Either way, though, The Cruise is a journey worth taking. [27 Nov 1998, p.03]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Babadook, then, is a study in madness that lurks beneath the surface. But it is also very much (and amusingly) a look at the trials of parenting, especially single-parenting: those days when you just want to, well, get your child out of the picture somehow. Of course, you don't act on those impulses. That's what the movies are for.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Footage from VanDyke's travels provides the first-person narrative thrust to Point and Shoot, but Curry's interviews with VanDyke, back in his Baltimore home, are what give the film its larger, more challenging context.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Something about the way the film has been assembled doesn't feel altogether organic.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Johnny Depp, in bushy eyebrows, sinister mustache, and a suit and hat of fur, may be too cartoonishly lascivious for his own good as the wolf who pursues the girl in the scarlet cape to Grandmother's house. But then he gets to croon the couplet, "There's no way to describe what you feel / When you're talking to your meal." Delicious.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Beefed up and twanging like a true cowboy, Cooper nonetheless carries the full weight of his character's achievements - and the questions that come with them - as he tries to find his footing back on Texas soil. If American Sniper fails at being a truly great film, it is no fault of its star.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Gritty, suspenseful and almost poetic in its depiction of an unforgiving town, A Most Violent Year is just shy of being great.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Mommy is too long for its own good, its sense of hysteria too relentless. But the headlong energy is intoxicating more than exhausting, and Freud would have a field day with Die and Steve. A mother and child, so sweet, so tender, so terrifying.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With creepy sound effects (thuds and clangs and groans, oh my) and a mounting - make that sinking - sense of dread, Black Sea is at once fist-clenchingly suspenseful and, well, dull.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a good story, a sad story, a story of triumph and prejudice and terrible hypocrisy. And Cumberbatch aces it all - another smartly realized but deeply soulful performance from an actor who seemingly can do no wrong.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    There are good things to say about the inspirational Disney sports film McFarland, USA, starting with its up-from-the-scrap-heap story, which happens to be true.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The vampires in What We Do in the Shadows are symbolic of something else altogether: epic unkemptness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Although James and Madden are no Fred and Ginger when it comes time for the fabled ball, her breathy swoons and glitter-splashed décolletage and his personable imperviousness bode well for the couple's future.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Salvation is severe and bloody stuff.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Effie Gray is peculiarly compelling, even if the issue of sexual repression, all the Victorian manners, seem light-years gone and close to unfathomable.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The transformation of Reynold's lawyer from a bumbler and stumbler to a victorious litigator, sticking it to an entire nation, is the stuff of a Frank Capra/Jimmy Stewart pic.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Baumbach, whose films include the searingly funny, autobiographical "The Squid and the Whale" and the brilliantly uncomfortable "Margot at the Wedding," writes wry, sharp, poignant stuff.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This quiet, aching film - punctuated by dead-on music choices, a blues song, reggae, the requisite Leonard Cohen - doesn't answer those questions. It's enough to raise them.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The line between ha-ha funny and sorrowful reverence has been crossed - more deftly than you'd think.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    George Miller's Fury Road is a hundred things at once: a biker movie, a spaghetti western, a post-apocalyptic dystopian action pic, a tale of female empowerment (The Vagina Monologues' Eve Ensler was a consultant on set), a Bosch painting made scary 3D real, a Keystone Kops screwball romp, and an auto show from hell.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Spinney comes across as a man whose warm spirit is literally at the core of the loving, if loopy Big Bird.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Dreamy and impressionistic, full of debauchery, drugs, disco, and dazzling couture, Saint Laurent is a biopic that picks its moments, leaving backstory behind.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Quite literally the blockbuster of the year.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This peripatetic farce practically propels itself.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    I'll See You in My Dreams is delicate and nuanced, with writing that rejects, or at least reshapes, the cliches of movies about people facing the glare of their sunset years.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Jurassic World, like its genomed nemesis, is bigger, and it is pretty scary. But it's not nearly as cool, or as smart, as "Jurassic Park."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Deeply personal and filled with love, Maya Forbes' Infinitely Polar Bear is nonetheless a hard movie to watch - hard to watch comfortably.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Cartel Land offers a chilling glimpse into a world of violence and vigilantism.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    All nutty, all nonsensical, all aboard.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Although its origin-story machinations get the better of it, Ant-Man isn't a bust.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    What keeps this cornball business from getting out of hand is the commitment of Gyllenhaal, whose performance is fierce and muscular, in and out of the ring.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Although it often feels like a company-bankrolled promo film, A Lego Brickumentary answers all the questions both Lego novices and Lego nerds would want to know.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Best of Enemies offers a bracing view of a pivotal time in our recent history, as Vietnam and race riots scarred a nation's soul, and as the Establishment and the Counter Culture exchanged epithets and blows.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Rosenwald tells the remarkable story of a remarkable man.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A taut thriller about an American family touching down in an unnamed country just as a violent coup erupts, No Escape goes about its gut-churning business by playing (and preying) on our worst xenophobic tendencies.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Digging for Fire, like last year's "Happy Christmas" (also with Kendrick) and 2013's "Drinking Buddies" (with Johnson and Kendrick), is not a film for fans of taut, crafted dialogue and definitive endings. Conversations drift and weave, as do the people having them. Narcissistic melancholy dukes it out with beer-and-pot-stoked merriment. There is longing. There is foolhardiness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Black Mass, a down and dirty crime drama based on the exploits of Boston gangster James "Whitey" Bulger, is thrilling for a number of reasons.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    There'd be a lot less strife and starvation, disease and dread, if Nancy Meyers ruled the world.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    As a celebration of agility, ability, and outlandish human behavior, The Walk is a winning thing. It may not get inside the head of its pole-balancing protagonist - it doesn't really even try - but Zemeckis' movie takes you skyward.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    I'm not sure if leavening is the right word, but Brolin, as an enigmatic U.S. agent with a world-weary cynicism and a black-ops vibe, provides at least a dose of (very) dark humor to the proceedings.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A polished piece of advocacy filmmaking, He Named Me Malala begins - and is intercut with - beautiful animated sequences featuring Malala's 19th-century namesake, Malalai of Maiwand, an Afghani Pashtun poet who inspired her countrymen to rally against an onslaught of British troops.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The country goes unnamed, the warring factions aren't always clear, but the nightmarish exploitation of children is made specific in the most vivid, visceral ways.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Is Steve Jobs a great film? I don't think so. It's an achievement, certainly, full of Sorkin flourishes, breathtaking and brilliant one-liners that reveal a lot about the characters who deliver them.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Assassin is not "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon", and it is certainly not "Kill Bill". But Hou - a linchpin of Taiwan's New Wave movement, the director of "A City of Sadness" and "The Puppetmaster" - evokes the magic, the majesty, the artistry of the martial-arts movie tradition, and brings a Zen-like sense of observation to the proceedings
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If we now take a woman's right to vote and to hold public office for granted, Suffragette reminds us that it wasn't that long ago when things were different.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's business as usual, even if that business is pulled off with brilliant precision, ingeniously choreographed action, and an itinerary boasting some of the most photogenic spots on Earth.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    What Our Fathers Did is a movie about historical and filial responsibility, about repudiation, about acceptance, about the pain we inherit, and the pain that continues to be doled out.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If Mockingjay - Part 1 is quieter and less flashy than its predecessors, that doesn't make it less satisfying.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a period piece full of colorful characters, natty costumes, jaunty music.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Safe, disturbing and edgy and grounded by Moore's riveting performance, resonates with uncertainty.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An accomplished and compelling film by writer/director Josh Mond, James White is also pretty much a bummer.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It looks lovely in an art-directed way, and Eddie Redmayne, who won his Oscar earlier in the year for his portrayal of Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything, looks lovely, too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If Macbeth comes off at times like a Classics Illustrated comic-book adaptation (there is one, from 1955), it can also be quite moving, quite troubling, haunting, even.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Force Awakens is half reboot, half remake, and all fun.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Joy
    Joy's entry into the world of entrepreneurship has the crazy trajectory of a rocket gone haywire, and Russell's movie is kind of haywire, too.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A goofy conflation of Coenian elements: the numbskull huggermugger of "The Big Lebowski", the La La Land surrealness of "Barton Fink", the Old Testament overlay of "A Serious Man."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Watermelon Woman is a thoughtful, charming movie that takes its audience along on a journey of self-discovery - without ever taking itself too seriously.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The relationship between the young American and the old Frenchman is as rich as one of Perrier's sauces: the pupil and the teacher, the son and the father, the keen protégé and the stubborn classicist.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An impossibly enjoyable live-action cartoon that plays on our real-life anxieties about vengeful cadres of foreign radicals blowing up people - and places.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Apart from its anthropomorphic, allegorical angle, Zootopia is also a tale of female empowerment and a classic noir, too.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Wickedly clever nightmare entertainment.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Bronze, for all its crudeness and lewdness (Melissa Raunch, anyone?) and wonky comedy, is actually a good old-fashioned tale of redemption.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Batman v Superman lacks the levity (forced or otherwise) of a typical Marvel Universe entry. But Snyder's superpowered epic does have a sense of import and grandeur about it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Engaging, though certainly not groundbreaking, I Went Down manages to quote from Plato and deploy a cheap joke about masturbation (twice). As gangster movies go, it's a charmer. [3 July 1998, p.3]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Linklater, drawing from his own experiences as a baseball player at Sam Houston State University, looks back with affection, a knowing wink, and maybe the beginnings of an apologetic shrug at the jerk behavior, the locker-room pranks. These guys smell freedom in the air - and maybe some pot smoke, too.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Miles Ahead is more a provocative character sketch than a meaty portrait, but it's a film that should be applauded for its daring, and for Cheadle's shape-shifting, soul-baring work.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Blending facts, anecdotes, and no little conjecture, Elvis & Nixon finally finds the two American icons face to face, sharing M&M's and Dr Peppers.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Theron proves the master of operatic hissy fits, Blunt lets the pain show beneath the glacial cool, Chastain brings her usual Juilliard-schooled commitment to the occasion, and Hemsworth is Hemsworthian, if oft-times incomprehensible, delivering his lines in a gorse-y whorl of vowels and consonants.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With every new installment of the comic book franchise, the scale gets bigger, relationships get trickier, new forces enter the fray.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With Sarandon in the title role, Scafaria has a winner: The actress tackles Marnie headlong, with heart and soul, trolling the fancy outdoor shopping mall for products to buy and for people to intercept and hang on to.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Smart and gripping - at least until the third act.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Rogen and Efron's characters find a novel new use for automobile airbags, too. These guys are geniuses.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    One of the things that distinguishes Love & Friendship from the multitude of Austen adaptations - the worthy and the less so - is its heroine. Lady Susan Vernon, a widow of devilish charms, is as frank and fearless a character as Austen ever imagined.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Like Shane Black's directing debut, "Kiss Kiss Bang Bang" with Robert Downey, Jr., his The Nice Guys borrows from noir traditions and pulp fiction, throwing a fresh coat of smart-alecky comedy over the whole thing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Much of Finding Dory is funny, and fun. But there's something kind of haunting about our heroine's memory thing. If you forget where you are, and who you are, and why you are - isn't that called Losing Dory?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    And tell me if I'm nuts, but another distraction: Doesn't the BFG bear a striking resemblance to George W. Bush?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Swiss Army Man is a quest movie of sorts, and also a sort of modern-day piece of absurdist theater. Samuel Beckett by way of Monty Python, it is a story that is at once rooted in the fixations of adolescence (sex, the idea of sex, bodily functions, more sex) and in the loftier firmaments of the mind.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In much the same way that the smash "Zootopia" demonstrated that creatures of different culture and class and species are better off when they come together, The Secret Life of Pets is a testament to teamwork and friendship and fixing the rifts that divide us. Let the fur - and the warm, fuzzy feelings - fly.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    McCarthy, Wiig, McKinnon, and Jones bring a spirit of spontaneity to their interactions; it's not exactly seat-of-the-pants improv, but it doesn't feel blocked-out and belabored, either.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Moretti knows how to orchestrate a good laugh when it's needed, but he can plumb more soulful, sorrowful depths, too. In Mia Madre, with its self-doubting director and wild-card American interloper, Moretti works a palette of shifting moods. Triumphantly.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    There's a playlike quality to Complete Unknown (Marston's cowriter, Julian Sheppard, has extensive credits in the theater). That's not a bad thing: The talk is smart. The actors doing the talking are easy to like.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With its icy symphonic score (courtesy of Iceland’s Johan Johansson) and a palette of rainy-day colors, Arrival is at once majestic and melancholy. It’s a grand endeavor, and Adams, at the center of it all, brings pluck and smarts and a deep-seated sorrow to her role. This is her movie, no doubt.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It is a fever dream of a movie, tracking its subject as she tries to maintain control, maintain her composure and her sanity, and as she tries — shellshocked, quaking with grief, but also fiercely determined — to shape and secure her husband’s legacy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Doesn't have the dramatic heft to warrant all its angst and anguish.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    One moment it's farcical comedy, the next it's gruesome melodrama. The movie never finds the right tone.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Plays around with some interesting notions, such as the nature of reality, the nature of humanity, and the nature of spiffy apartments with sleek bathroom fixtures.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Never as much fun as (Woo's) old Chow Yun Fat-starring Chinese pics.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A likable, low-budget high school comedy.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Krueger's comedy doesn't always spark, but its underlying intelligence - not to mention Graham's eyes - shines through.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Williamson's screenplay doesn't match the cleverness of his conceit; it lacks the requisite archness and wit.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Laced with a venomous wit, and turning progressively creepier as it unfolds, writer-director Jon Reiss' movie offers a black-humored study of suppressed rage, sexual gamesmanship, domination and subordination.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Corny and blubbery as it is, still packs an emotional wallop.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Sweet-natured but overdone, over-long film.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Tries too hard to be playful and sensual, wacky and romantic, and comes away feeling fake and prefabricated instead.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A yawning affair that would be a perfectly fine video rental but doesn't really require the big screen.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The film only occasionally comes to life - it's too literal (and literary), too studied, too still.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Long and lugubrious.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's low-grade Casablanca - an ill-fated love affair, rife with murder and deceit, with World War II as a backdrop and a farewell scene that has something to do with getting to Paris.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Doesn't run very deep, or resonate with profound meaning. But as a thoughtful fable, laced with humor, the picture has its charms.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A bit of a one-joke wonder.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Skarsgard's performance is bold and raw (and reminiscent of vintage Jack Lemmon in its earnestness).
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    O
    Stripped of its poetry, some of the devices of the tragedy of the Moor come off here as woefully contrived.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lacks an essential sense of purpose.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Now in his late 40s and hairier than ever, Jeremy seems a simple enough, likable guy, and he has no pretensions about what he does. And no apologies either.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Too freewheeling for its own good, like a Robert Altman ensemble piece without a gravitational core. But Hawke's actors are a talented troupe, and even when things get self-indulgent and fuzzy-headed (and boy, do they!), interesting stuff is going on.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Yes, it's stupid. But sometimes it's stupid with a capital S, and it's in those moments of transcendent idiocy that you can't help liking Saving Silverman. At least, a little bit.

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