For 1,960 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Carol
Lowest review score: 0 Isn't She Great
Score distribution:
1960 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A terrific mystery, equal parts haunting love story and nimble thriller.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Smoking, shouting, practically shooting off sparks, Cruz spreads a wildfire sexuality across Allen's sunny tableau of Catalan country picnics and scenic Barcelona ramblings.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A kind of deadpan soap opera - but one that, despite its high melodrama and wicked humor, delivers a real emotional wallop.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    There's real joy in O'Day's eyes - and larynx - as she bobs and weaves through an amazing songbook.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    There's no quick fix for a culture "addicted to debt," as one wag puts it in the film. But watching I.O.U.S.A. is a good place to start.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Stays with you like great movies tend to do. It asks you to examine the inner mechanisms of human beings, cheerful and miserable alike. It's not about looking at a glass half empty or a glass half full. It's about drinking down what's in that glass and letting it fill your soul.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Fear(s) of the Dark, a French production, interweaves the shorts, linking the segments together thematically, and narratively.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is a picture of quiet observation, contained emotion, the hush before the cathartic scream.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Funny, fear-inducing, with periods of voyeuristic gore and an undercurrent of anxiety and dread, Let the Right One In is up there with the bloodsucking classics.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Pray the Devil Back to Hell is at once inspiring and horrific.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Roiling with laughter, tears, drunken confessions, revelatory soliloquies, pain, sorrow, hospital visits, and various kinds of love, A Christmas Tale is a smart, sprawling, and sublimely entertaining feast.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Hunger is daunting and powerful work.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's a haunting, scary, funny, sad portrayal from Rourke.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A frightening portrait of corruption, cynicism, intimidation, greed and violence, Gomorrah is tough stuff.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Not just a great sports movie, Harvard Beats Yale 29-29 captures a pivotal moment in recent history.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Forceful, heart-wrenching stuff.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Impossibly charming and impossibly French.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A sly and surprisingly sublime little noir romance.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A slow-burning, character-rich study in desperation, grief, vengeance, loyalty, and love. It's the sort of arthouse entry - in German, mostly - that gets you thinking about an English-language remake.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Quietly and keenly observed, Summer Hours nods to Chekhov's "The Cherry Orchard" (a country estate, a family reunion, an impending sale). Assayas displays a lucid sense of how personal history and family identity are inextricably linked to a physical place - here, to a house that is still busy accumulating its memories.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Fused with paranoia and almost unbearable suspense, The Hurt Locker is powerful stuff.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A heart-grabbing, awe-inspiring work that needs no embellishment.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The rare movie that manages to convey the inner soul of an artist.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A wise, wistful study of hope and dread.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    On a deeper level, the Dardennes' film offers a portrait of a fragile yet determined woman set on making a home for herself in the world, even as that world unravels before her eyes.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A heartbreaking film that speaks to the lifelong aftershocks of war, and to the powerful bonds of family and of love.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Avatar delivers. Combining beyond-state-of-the-art moviemaking with a tried-and-true storyline and a gamer-geek sensibility - not to mention a love angle, an otherworldly bestiary, and an arsenal of 22d-century weaponry - the movie quite simply rocks.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    At once noble and naive, earnest and a tad obnoxious.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    What's less clear, and more maddening, is how several generations of Ecuadorans have been left to live on toxic land, their health and livelihoods compromised, while lawyers file motions and counter-motions and blame is passed around.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Suffers from several goofily tacky animated reenactments and a music score that unnecessarily underlines the significance of key events, but for those who lived through the turmoil of Vietnam, and for the generations that have come since, the film is an important document in its own right.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Although its tone is generally genial and jovial, Good Hair touches on some tricky issues, at times complicitly.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is magnificent filmmaking, and a magnificent film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Linklater's film adaptation succeeds in bringing the flamboyant Welles to life.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Splendid, smile-inducing fun.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This cunning and provocative Romanian film requires patience, but its rewards are many: It's hard to imagine how a scene in which a police captain barks an order to bring him a dictionary can be loaded with suspense, but, really, it is.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's oppressive and claustrophobic, confused and scary in there. But it's also compellingly real.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Presented with an economy and emotional cool that add to, rather than subtract from, its dramatic impact, The Girl on the Train reverberates with a quiet, seductive power.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Rife with nightmarishly violent and horrific behavior. It's intense, graphic, frightening.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Greenberg, with Stiller's sad and self-mocking portrait at its core, is well worth getting to know.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A gorgeous operatic tale of obsession and madness.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Kick-Ass has punk energy, ace action moves, and a winning sense of absurdist fun.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's a devilishly twisted affair.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    There's whimsy and raunchy humor here, but also an underlying sense of darkness and despair.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's been a long time since a film has conveyed a culture, and a sense of place, with such telling precision. At the same time, Winter's Bone thrums with suspense.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The talented Hansen-Love, with clarity and economy, manages to avoid the maudlin.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Like "The Square," the startling Down Under noir released a few months ago, Animal Kingdom explores the down and dirty side of human nature, fraught with greed, suspicion, and betrayal.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    As in David Lean's "Brief Encounter," the suspense in Cairo Time comes from what doesn't happen between its pair of "lovers."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A meditation on a life lived in the public eye, I'm Still Here is strange, riveting, and occasionally appalling stuff, any way you look at it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's a heartbreaker of a coming-of-age tale, even if there's a string of exsanguinated corpses to be accounted for.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    From the street corner to the boardroom to the White House, the same paradigms are in play, Brown argues.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Eastwood and Morgan's movie, with its epic natural disasters (and a terrifying, man-made one) is optimistic. Hokey, even. But it's beautiful, too.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's not a very good title, Waste Land - this isn't a bleak film, at all - but just about everything else in Lucy Walker's documentary works, and illuminates.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Client 9 speaks plenty of truth - about politics, power, human nature - even if you don't buy into the hit-job hypothesis.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The Fighter is funny, ferocious, sad, sweet, pulpy, and violent. Sometimes, all in the same minute.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A darkly comic, piercing, and occasionally painful study of a young woman's quest for identity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    True Grit is probably the least ironic picture in the Coen Brothers' worthy canon, but that doesn't mean it's devoid of their signature oddities, that it doesn't take a few dark, strange turns.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A beautifully mopey adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro's much-praised novel.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    OK, first off, anyone who shares his or her life with a dog, or has done so in the past, go see My Dog Tulip.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Biutiful is strong stuff, it will leave you shaken. There's poetry here, and catastrophe.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Crash fools around with chronology in a Tarantinoesque way that brings its story full circle. You could argue that as events, and people, merge, Haggis' spiky screenplay (cowritten with Bobby Moresco) gets to be, quite simply, too much.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Limitless rocks.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    That this purposefully twisting exercise takes place amid the sun-burnished cypresses and towns of Tuscany - where ancient statuary is as commonplace as pasta and wine - only makes this playfully enigmatic meditation the more pleasing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Hanna is a goofy and exhilarating mash-up of all sorts of things. Luc Besson's "The Professional" comes to mind, as do the propulsive synth-syncopations of "Run Lola Run" and the dark allegorical menace of Grimms fairy tales.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    And how can you not reflect about time, and change, and physical and spiritual being, when confronted with such a stunning visual record of human existence?
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is an indie film with big stars - but also an indie films with big ideas about bringing real people to life.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Reverberates with the power and passion of Greek tragedy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Exhilarating and, ultimately, filled with a sense of existential dread.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Chuan's unsettlingly beautiful black-and-white, wide-screen account of those nightmare six weeks, re-creates that horror in ways that are at once allusive and lucid, mixing cinematic impressionism with documentary-like detail.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The Last Mountain, more than anything, asks us to consider where our energy comes from, and how we can bring about changes that benefit all of us and the planet we live on.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    There's nothing mean-spirited, or judgmental, about the way Morris goes about his business - he must have been kicking himself with glee as one bizarre strand of the story unravels to reveal the next.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A breakneck French thriller, Point Blank is so ridiculously successful at keeping its momentum going - and keeping the audience tense with suspense - that it's likely to leave you with your heart pounding, gasping for breath.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The dialogue is smart, screwball, sublime.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A meditation on mortality, on loneliness, on the way technology and narcissism have intersected to create a fascinating monster, The Future is all of this and more. What Frank Capra would have made of it, who knows? But he would have liked its star.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Exhilarating and tragic.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Like some murderous version of "Working Girl," the ruthless exec and the seemingly naive underling go at one another - turning the film, at a pivotal moment, into a satisfying whodunit.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A must-see for Pearl Jam fans - and for folks keen on gleaning insights into the pressures that come with megastardom.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Melancholia is a remarkable mood piece with visuals to die for (excuse the pun), and a performance from Dunst that runs the color spectrum of emotions.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Into the Abyss is a true-crime drama, to be sure, but in Herzog's hands it becomes something much more: an inquiry into fundamental moral, philosophical, and religious issues, and an examination of humankind's capacity for violence - individual and institutional.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This beautifully taut and terrifying thriller is faithful to its source in just about every way that matters.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Think "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," but then think fun.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    At once a deeply personal film and an important historical document, The Man Nobody Knew leaves us with an incomplete portrait of a man. Did Colby have a moral core? Did he know what was truth, and what was a lie? Did he sanction assassination plots? Did he love his family? Was he even capable of love?
    • 95 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's small. It's real. And it's deeply moving.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Valérie Donzelli's Declaration of War deals with issues that may scare audiences away. Don't let it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Chronicle is full of smart writing that isn't too smart.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Brian Cox is especially good, and slippery, as Menenius, a Roman senator.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's the powerful emotional punch their films deliver - and this one is no exception - that elevate the game, that make them so satisfying, so worthwhile. The Kid With a Bike grabs at the heart.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    While The Forgiveness of Blood lacks the narrative momentum of director Joshua Marston's previous film, "Maria Full of Grace" - it is nonetheless fascinating.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    David Gelb's thoughtful and wonderful documentary, Jiro Dreams of Sushi, explores the dedication of this humble, bespectacled man, and the Zen-like focus he has for his work - or, as many would claim, for his art.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The beautiful misery of The Deep Blue Sea - Terence Davies' crushing adaptation of Terence Rattigan's 1952 play - is almost too much.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's more of a character study, insightful and nuanced, about a man grappling with a profound sense of inadequacy, questioning himself. In many ways, We Have a Pope recalls last year's Oscar winner, "The King's Speech": Someone who doesn't feel up to the job fate has handed him, and then struggling to come to terms with it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Weirdly funny, inspiring film.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Kore-eda, deploying a Western pop score by the Japanese indie-rock band Quruli, just lets these kids be kids.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Ted
    Ted is really a rather sweet examination of loyalty, friendship, and love. Wahlberg and Kunis are charming together (though not exactly in a Cary Grant / Audrey Hepburn kind of way), and both manage to play this thing - at least the challenges-of-a-serious-relationship part of this thing - straight.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    An English-language remake is in the works, but why wait for the Hollywood knockoff? Easy Money is the real thing: a great gangster pic.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The Queen of Versailles combines the voyeuristic thrills of reality TV with the soul-revealing artistry of great portraiture and the head-shaking revelations of solid investigative reporting.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's a good thing not to know where a film is going - we need surprises, we need to be spun around a few times - and Ruby Sparks, which is about a writer and his muse, but then becomes more about the muse and her writer, is happily just such a film.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Ridiculously funny, ridiculously charming.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Beloved spans 45 years, shifting from Paris to Prague to London to Montreal, and it boasts an especially strong performance by Paul Schneider.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    David Ayer, the writer of "Training Day," director of "Street Kings," writer/director of "Harsh Times," does not make movies about princesses with witchy curses, about yuppie commitment-phobes, about talking plush toys. His territory is narrow, but he owns it: cops, in Los Angeles.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Late in Looper, when a highly telekinetic kid starts levitating things, it really does look like Christopher Nolan had wandered onto the set and taken over.

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