For 1,951 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 The Constant Gardener
Lowest review score: 0 A Little Bit of Heaven
Score distribution:
1951 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Murphy, in the boogeyman role, toggles between seductive and sinister with enough conviction to make you forget that his character makes no sense at all.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    Fulfills the promise of its title: It's transporting, it's magical.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At its best, Edge of Tomorrow plays like a tripwire time-travel thriller. As it progresses, though, the built-in repetition can, and does, grow tedious.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a character study, nicely realized.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    22 Jump Street's scattershot approach to comedy is rooted in the belief that for every anatomical, scatalogical, sexual, or pop-cultural reference and pun gone awry, another will stick to the wall like, um, bodily fluid.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A pitch-black comedy steeped in bitterness and regret.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    At once a deeply personal film and an important historical document, The Man Nobody Knew leaves us with an incomplete portrait of a man. Did Colby have a moral core? Did he know what was truth, and what was a lie? Did he sanction assassination plots? Did he love his family? Was he even capable of love?
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A crowd-pleaser of immense proportions.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This beautifully taut and terrifying thriller is faithful to its source in just about every way that matters.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If Macbeth comes off at times like a Classics Illustrated comic-book adaptation (there is one, from 1955), it can also be quite moving, quite troubling, haunting, even.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The two leads, Edgerton and Hardy, pull off their respective roles - rising above the cliches and the melodrama - with ferocity and focus.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    So gin-and-tonic dry, so deceptive in its deadpan-ness, that it's not always clear that Julian Fellowes is having fun. But he is.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A satisfyingly moody, melancholy, madcap live-action romp.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Although the pervading mood of Twin Falls Idaho - a beautifully shot, noirish thing - is one of sadness and loss, the Polishes' film is playful, too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A bit of a one-joke wonder.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Foxx makes what he does look effortless. He's the reason to see Collateral, as he walks into the frame and walks off with the picture.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Spinney comes across as a man whose warm spirit is literally at the core of the loving, if loopy Big Bird.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This Santa Claus story is for a midnight movie crowd, not the kiddie matinees.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A super-taut and superbly acted three-character piece.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Black Book doesn't let the grim facts of the Holocaust get in the way of some ripping pulp.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Francofonia is a brilliant meditation on art, on war - and what happens to art when nations go to war.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    A powerful film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Rain is a quiet, disquieting triumph.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The real-life career criminal Jacques Mesrine is seen in all his wild, scary, violent glory.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Rare, too, is the way The Broken Circle Breakdown incorporates music into its narrative. The songs - traditional bluegrass and country, and a clutch of new ones rooted in same - are as integral to the characters and their relationships as the dialogue.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Loose, eminently likable stuff.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Does what the best movies can do: take viewers to what might be unfamiliar places, into a culture with unique customs and traditions, and show, through drama and comedy, how the fundamental truths of the human experience need no translation.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    As a celebration of agility, ability, and outlandish human behavior, The Walk is a winning thing. It may not get inside the head of its pole-balancing protagonist - it doesn't really even try - but Zemeckis' movie takes you skyward.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Tcheng finds Simons in moments of haughty self-confidence and tremulous self-doubt.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A smart, sharp, stirring adaptation of the H.G. Bissinger best-seller.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    But the ending, at once ambiguous and obvious, is a letdown -- a frustratingly literal-minded, or literary-minded, conceit.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Patric and Liotta get the chance to do some heavy riffing on themes of honor, sacrifice, selling out and self-destructing, and the bleak, smeared world of drugs and violence is brought to the fore with feverish style.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's quite a lot of fun.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Smoking, shouting, practically shooting off sparks, Cruz spreads a wildfire sexuality across Allen's sunny tableau of Catalan country picnics and scenic Barcelona ramblings.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Ultimately, the movie's a bust.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Like Shane Black's directing debut, "Kiss Kiss Bang Bang" with Robert Downey, Jr., his The Nice Guys borrows from noir traditions and pulp fiction, throwing a fresh coat of smart-alecky comedy over the whole thing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Question: Is life still like a box of chocolates if you're going in reverse? The answer, in the case of the curiously Gumpian The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, is a gooey yes.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An unflashy but fascinating meditation on addiction and greed. The junkie was clearly Mahowny, but the greed, in a way, was everybody else's: the bankers', their flush clientele's, and the casinos', all busy feeding his habit.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Rodriguez is riveting, with a drop-dead cynical charm.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The real reason to see Blank City is to catch snatches of the now-decades-old films - priceless DIY numbers that capture all the wild energy, humor, and rage of, if not a more innocent time, then certainly a cooler one.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Siegel, in his debut as director, shot the low-budget Big Fan on a digital camera and achieves an appropriately grimy, gritty look. He has an eye for the telling detail and for the comedy in tragedy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Sensual, dreamlike, both intimate and epic, The House of Sand is a cinematic tour de force.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Moretti knows how to orchestrate a good laugh when it's needed, but he can plumb more soulful, sorrowful depths, too. In Mia Madre, with its self-doubting director and wild-card American interloper, Moretti works a palette of shifting moods. Triumphantly.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Despite the jumpy, ride-along camera work and the ever-present threat of engagement, a certain tedium sets in during the film.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    A dazzling costume epic, a spectacle for the eyes and for the soul.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Impossibly charming and impossibly French.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A sweet but unsticky comedy from Norway that was one of the five foreign- language nominees at this year's Academy Awards.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The problem with Captain America: The Winter Soldier is that there's too much going on: the Marvel Universe stuff, the WikiLeaks-ish paranoia stuff, the video game-ish CG visual effects stuff, the epic John Woo-ish everybody-pointing-a-weapon-at-everybody-else face-off stuff.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The Hoax makes the fakery of disgraced writers Jayson Blair, James Frey and Stephen Glass seem puny by comparison. Irving was the grand master, and Gere's portrait and Hallström's movie suggest why: He almost bought his own story, believed his own outrageous pack of lies.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Simple, poignant and leavened with humor, it's a film that affirms the nourishing aspects of love and companionship.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Arnold's Wuthering Heights has its doom-laden moments of urgency and heartache, but vast swaths of the (longish) film just seem to meander across the muddy hills.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    This sad, staggering drama should be seen: out of the grimness, and the profound calamity, you can almost taste life in your mouth.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Merchants of Doubt shouldn't be a hard sell. The fact that it is should make you very mad.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Try not to let the film's overbearingly jaunty score get in the way. The Lady in the Van is quite a feat.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Labaki, who studied filmmaking in Lebanon and France, has a deft touch and nice instincts.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Splendid, smile-inducing fun.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    By the time this globe-hopping, movie-star-crammed disaster saga - directed with petrifying efficiency by Steven Soderbergh - comes full circle, you'll never want to touch a subway pole or elevator button or ATM again.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    For a movie about community and forgiveness, family and grace, Pieces of April is refreshingly unsappy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Aspires to the devilish crudity and unfettered social commentary of South Park. But Zwigoff's direction lacks the exaggerated cartoonishness necessary.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A fascinating, albeit self-congratulatory, account of how Disney's fabled animation department was reenergized and reimagined between 1984 and 1994.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Warlords, ultimately, tries to speak to the futility of war - but it does so by staging one gargantuan dustup after another.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    There's no quick fix for a culture "addicted to debt," as one wag puts it in the film. But watching I.O.U.S.A. is a good place to start.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    An eerily quiet, bracingly bloody, and expertly laid-out adaptation of the Cormac McCarthy novel.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Béart, too beautiful for words, brings a complex swirl of emotions, elegantly restrained and marked with pain, to this finely wrought work.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    By movie's end, it seems like the only one giving a truly genuine performance is Bianca. Mouth-agape, steadfastly mum.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Boy
    Boy begins with an epigram from E.T.: "You could be happy here . . . . We could grow up together." That's what the film is about - finding happiness, growing up, feeling like a stranger in a strange world.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Quiet, quirky gem.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    How much is shaman and how much is showman is hard to tell. Some of Levitch's staccato soliloquies have the ring of truth, and some have the ring of jive. Either way, though, The Cruise is a journey worth taking. [27 Nov 1998, p.03]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Less a Holocaust retribution fantasy than a messy homage to war movies, and to movies, period.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A beautifully mopey adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro's much-praised novel.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Scott shoots and edits Unstoppable with roller-coaster momentum and an eye (and ear) on that roaring tonnage of steel.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Satisfying and spirited and laced with humor.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Crash fools around with chronology in a Tarantinoesque way that brings its story full circle. You could argue that as events, and people, merge, Haggis' spiky screenplay (cowritten with Bobby Moresco) gets to be, quite simply, too much.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Like "Tremors," only ickier, Slither is a tongue-in-cheek horror flick that skewers the genre while delivering seat-squirming scares.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This is a smart, spirited spoof that will leave you with a smile on your face - and an appetite for some serious '70s funk to play on the eight-track in your solid gold Cadillac convertible.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    A feel-good movie, in the absolute best sense.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Windblown, with a sage and playful Zen vibe, Wong Kar Wai's Ashes of Time Redux is a color-saturated, slo-mo martial arts piece about time, memory, love, regret, betrayal.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Directed in workmanlike style by Underworld: Evolution's Len Wiseman, has its share of wild stunts and spectacular carnage, but it feels pokey and predictable, too.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Engaging, though certainly not groundbreaking, I Went Down manages to quote from Plato and deploy a cheap joke about masturbation (twice). As gangster movies go, it's a charmer. [3 July 1998, p.3]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The Cooler is small-scale moviemaking about small-scale lives. But it's big in all the right ways.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Sure, it's a skewed view through adolescent eyes, but it's one that still speaks to the aspirations, agendas, image-making and spin control behind a real, grown-up political election.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Duplicity zips from one elaborate piece of hugger-mugger to the next. But at a certain point (for me, it was Rome), boredom sets in.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The Painted Veil is rich with history and heartbreak. It's stirring stuff.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Digging for Fire, like last year's "Happy Christmas" (also with Kendrick) and 2013's "Drinking Buddies" (with Johnson and Kendrick), is not a film for fans of taut, crafted dialogue and definitive endings. Conversations drift and weave, as do the people having them. Narcissistic melancholy dukes it out with beer-and-pot-stoked merriment. There is longing. There is foolhardiness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Cold Souls entertains on its own terms, delivering irony and suspense as Giamatti discovers that his soulless self is a terrible, terrible actor.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Thanks to the evocative cinematography of Ed Lachman, it is bathed in a celestial light that cannot penetrate the existential darkness of its characters.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Her life, and her work, transcended what we think of as "fashion."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    What Our Fathers Did is a movie about historical and filial responsibility, about repudiation, about acceptance, about the pain we inherit, and the pain that continues to be doled out.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The chaos and carnage here is just a pumped-up take on a tradition that harks back to Godzilla, and harks back, of course, to the Marvel comics from which all these heros originally sprang.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    Wickedly smart and wickedly playful, Roman Polanski's adaptation of David Ives' Tony-nominated Venus in Fur works on so many levels, it's almost dizzying.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A terrific mystery, equal parts haunting love story and nimble thriller.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A fine, inventive '70s period piece about friendship, first love, and growing up to face the hard lessons of life.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Chronicle is full of smart writing that isn't too smart.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Johnny Depp, in bushy eyebrows, sinister mustache, and a suit and hat of fur, may be too cartoonishly lascivious for his own good as the wolf who pursues the girl in the scarlet cape to Grandmother's house. But then he gets to croon the couplet, "There's no way to describe what you feel / When you're talking to your meal." Delicious.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Like Sorkin's D.C.-set TV series, "West Wing," his script for Charlie Wilson's War is full of rapid-fire badinage, with movers and shakers moving smart and shaking snappy as a squad of aides trot along behind, briefcases and coffee cups in tow. A decade - not to mention a war - never went by so quickly.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Succeeds royally at building a sense of apocalyptic dread. It isn't quite so successful at sustaining that mood, and Fessenden resorts to blurry images of totemic spirit forces and stampeding moose specters to get where he's going. And where exactly is that? To a place designed to scare the bejesus out of us planet-pillaging consumers.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a tale of survival and kitsch that will win you over.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Rings true for the most part, and explores human nature - leashed and unleashed - in ways that resonate.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Devilishly delightful.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Even the Rain strikes a deep and resonant chord.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Maybe it's generational: In a movie about teens, it's the teens who should rule. And they do. With certainty. With laughter. And with tears - buckets and buckets.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    One of the problems with the way Mamet resolves Mike's predicament is that it's ridiculously implausible - even in the context of a far-fetched fight story.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    By detailing the allegiance between Tutsi Muslims and Christian Hutus, and the fatwa issued by a Muslim leader forbidding his followers to participate in the massacres, the film is hopeful rather than horrific, even as it describes events of impossible savagery and hate.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Watts gives a deep and Oscar-worthy performance here, displaying the steely composure that made Plame a valued NOC (non-official cover operative).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    For a comedy about autoerotic asphyxiation, epic deception, and shameless exploitation, World's Greatest Dad is a surprisingly sweet and tender affair.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's the dynamic between the three leads, Rawlins, Sives and Henderson - and the young McKinlay, who's like a miniature Shirley Henderson - that is this oddball and bittersweet story's pulsing heart.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Fear(s) of the Dark, a French production, interweaves the shorts, linking the segments together thematically, and narratively.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    McAvoy is charismatic, funny, and on the mark. Hall and Eve are both just right in their roles - bringing depth and detail to what could have been caricature parts. And if Starter for 10 takes a turn into foolhardy tragedy, it doesn't linger too long there.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a study in human behavior, describing how a self-confessed "emotional wreck," through accident and ambition, talent and temperament, became a star.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A disconcerting experience.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Brazen shocker is never less than compelling -- even when you feel compelled to shut your eyes.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Tender but never sappy, Monsieur Ibrahim brings two people of vastly different age and background together in ways that are touching, and telling. It's a small, glowing gem.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There is plenty in Star Trek Beyond for diehard Trekkers to enjoy, and director Justin Lin (Fast & Furious) guns the action sequences.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Richly informative and fascinating.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It also smells very much like a movie with money on its mind - not altogether successfully balancing its loftier ideas with a sense of superficial whimsy and Vegas-meets-Wizard of Oz production design.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Possession, humiliation, jealousy, revelation . . . they're all painted in light, swift strokes by the veteran director and his two stars.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A light and extremely likable comedy -- just what the doctor ordered right now.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Informative, funny, sad and intriguing.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    As entertaining as it is exasperating.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The truth is left for the audience to decide. And while the conclusion isn't necessarily clear, it is unsettling.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    David Ayer, the writer of "Training Day," director of "Street Kings," writer/director of "Harsh Times," does not make movies about princesses with witchy curses, about yuppie commitment-phobes, about talking plush toys. His territory is narrow, but he owns it: cops, in Los Angeles.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The heart of the matter - and the viscera - is the action, and one man's determination to survive. Apocalypto is primal.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    And if there's a problem with Tintin, it's that it's too big and booming.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With Sarandon in the title role, Scafaria has a winner: The actress tackles Marnie headlong, with heart and soul, trolling the fancy outdoor shopping mall for products to buy and for people to intercept and hang on to.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's giving nothing away to say that Munro makes it to Bonneville, and breaks the record - which apparently still stands - on his two-wheel contraption.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A wise, wistful study of hope and dread.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At a certain point, The Homesman will take you by surprise. By the end, a ferry ride across the Missouri River, it will take your heart.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Fragmented, dreamlike, a whir of memories and misery, We Need to Talk About Kevin is unsettling, but also somehow unnecessary.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Easily the best computer-animated feature to come from Hollywood in a long while, Monster House is also one of the weirdest. A creepy-crawly, freak-show Halloween yarn.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Black Mass, a down and dirty crime drama based on the exploits of Boston gangster James "Whitey" Bulger, is thrilling for a number of reasons.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Kari's film, witty and sad, is a spare, small thing, but Noi has a poetry about it, and a poignancy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Bittersweet and funny.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    An epic work of self-indulgence and smug riffing, stringing together tropes from TV and screen westerns and closed-room whodunits, The Hateful Eight announces itself with all the pomp and circumstance of a mid-century cinema spectacle.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The less said about the twists and turns The Illusionist takes, the better. Suffice to say, Eisenheim's masterful deceptions do not stop when he exits the stage.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Like "Hope and Glory," Boorman's Queen and Country finds exhilarating comedy in places usually reserved for drama, violence, loss.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A weird fusion of blaxploitation and American indie, built on a template of old-style, follow-your-dream Hollywood drama. But it works - sometimes magnificently.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Odd, and awkward in places, but its lyricism and power stay with you.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Damon, starring in his first full-fledged action pic, brings a determined bearing and believability to the proceedings.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Michelle Williams is a beautiful moper.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Directed with an easygoing grace by Campbell Scott, has the feel of a coming-of-age novel.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Monaghan is stronger still. This is a performance that deserves to be noticed. She is crushingly good.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Client 9 speaks plenty of truth - about politics, power, human nature - even if you don't buy into the hit-job hypothesis.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    It's impossible to imagine anyone, right-leaning or left, coming away from this hugely important documentary unshaken by its representation of the United States and its military establishment.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A shamelessly fun B-movie with A-movie effects.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a wise and endearing little film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Holofcener writes with an ear for the rhythms and ridiculousness of real life, and her cast - to a man, and woman - embraces her words with subtlety and certitude. Friends With Money is gimmickless, and great.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    As it is, most of X2's action is restricted to the Northeast Corridor, with a climactic face-off in the western Rockies, where, in typical blockbuster fashion, everything goes kablooey and ka-bam.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Kafka-esque, Terry Gilliam-esque (Brazil), Charlie Kaufman-esque (remember Floor 71/2 in Being John Malkovich?), and David Lynch-ian, too, The Double plays like a nightmare that will leave you spooked, jittery, and confused. Well, that's how it plays for Simon, anyway. For everyone else, it should leave us simply amused.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    If Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter takes its time, it's time worth taking. The cinematography is lovely: great swirls of midnight snow, frosted trees in glinting sun, the bustling modernity of Tokyo, a big library, subway stations exquisite in their orderliness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Without editorializing, Mermin raises fascinating questions about the cultural impact of globalization, the allure of the West, and the troubled history of an ancient land.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is a story about legacy, the sins of the father, the restlessness in our souls. It's powerful, it's bold, it hits you hard.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The paper's motto is "All the News That's Fit to Print." But all that news doesn't necessarily fit neatly into a 90-minute doc.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    For the casual viewer who feels like maybe all the Sith hoopla is worth checking out, well, it's like tuning in to the season finale of "24" without having watched a minute of its lead-up episodes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This mildly amusing tale of infidelity, blackmail, class differences and corporate greed not only strains credulity - it strains for laughs.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Zooms along with confidence, smarts, and some of the coolest car chases this side of the Indy 500.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Darren Aronofsky's Noah is the Old Testament on acid. It's the movie equivalent of Christian death metal. It's an antediluvian Lord of the Rings, fist-pumping, ferocious, apocalyptic, and wet - very wet.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    An ingenious blend of sci-fi and mystery.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Presented with an economy and emotional cool that add to, rather than subtract from, its dramatic impact, The Girl on the Train reverberates with a quiet, seductive power.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    When it works - and it doesn't half the time - it's as if Monty Python were back, putting its merrily imbecilic stamp on the dark world of terrorism.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At the heart of the film, Polley - with her wary, unsure stares, her open smile and beguiling intelligence - is terrific.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Cinema as jazz. More precisely, jazz traded by the likes of Charlie Parker, Billie Holliday, Chet Baker -- blurry, opiated, jagged with melancholy and stone cold beautiful.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Moon is a deceptively simple study of alienation, paranoia, and loneliness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Disturbingly good. The writing and the performances are such that as things go from bad (sad motel-room affairs) to worse (a 4-year-old gone missing), the film's characters get inside your skin, your soul. It's enough to make you want to cry.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's an Alzheimer's allegory, full of humanity, heart, and humor.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In Bruges, at its best, works like "Pulp Fiction" with Irish (and Belgian) accents, digressing into weird discourse and giving a bunch of actors the occasion to shine in small, peculiar roles.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Russian Dolls isn't quite the gem that its precursor was. It rambles. It's less of an ensemble effort. There's more of Xavier's moping self-centeredness. But Duris is terrific as the confused cusp-of-30 protagonist, and the rest of the cast is bright and beaming.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Out-of-control hilarious.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A handsome-looking movie that's full of the muted greens, browns and grays of the tony Hamptons, director Williams' tale never quite finds its footing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An economical thriller, both narratively and budgetarily, Sound of My Voice serves up moments of extreme dread and discomfort, but works a winning undercurrent of playful absurdity into the material as well.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The effectively creepy Stir of Echoes, is enough to make your blood chill.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It could have been more taut, could have been harder, but 25th Hour still resonates with power and poetry.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Rosenwald tells the remarkable story of a remarkable man.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    "Rebel Without a Cause" with a debate club, Better Luck Tomorrow is a sharp, smart slice of suburban angst among the high school overachiever set.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In The Business of Strangers the right words are hard to come by, but the truth of them -- and the lies -- cut to the quick.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A sappy excursion to Edwardian days.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Disarmingly laid back for this kind of fare, with a jazzy musical score (courtesy of David Holmes) and a sleek, straight-ahead style, Haywire may not make much sense plotwise, but it's a rollicking 90 minutes.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A beautifully strange movie.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    An extraordinarily perfect little film: A bittersweet drama that explores sexuality and love, and their reverberations across the landscape of human emotions.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The screenplay of Open Range, credited to one Craig Storper, is an awesome compendium of cowboy-movie cliches. It borders on parody, and often crosses the border, rustling up a drove of oater aphorisms.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Director Jennifer Yuh Nelson, who oversaw the elegant title sequences from the first film, likewise gives Kung Fu Panda 2's series of flashbacks a different look, harking back to Chinese shadow puppetry and delicate watercolors. With its mix of vibrant CG and classical elements, the movie dazzles.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    This taut cautionary tale explores the dark side of American politics. And leaves the viewer to wonder - if anyone's still wondering - is there a bright side?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A sloppy, sentimental story line and pivotal plot turns that are only sketchily realized undermine the life-on-the-road misadventures.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This sweet, yet unsentimental film is about growing up, losing innocence, and longing for a place, and people, to call home.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The mostly British ensemble can do this stuff in their sleep, but Macfadyen and Donovan and Graves, especially, work up the necessary antic angst and silliness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Seydoux, no doubt best known for her kickboxing catfight with Paula Patton in "Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol," gives a quiet, watchful performance, suggesting fealty for her lady but also a strong independent streak.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Stranger Than Fiction is slicker than Kaufman's work - and Forster's direction is certainly more studio-ish than Kaufman collaborators Spike Jonze's or Michel Gondry's. But it's a clever idea, and you feel a little smarter watching the thing unfurl.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    As in David Lean's "Brief Encounter," the suspense in Cairo Time comes from what doesn't happen between its pair of "lovers."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Over the Hedge isn't by any stretch bad. It's just banal.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A chick movie? Well, yes, but it's a whole lot cooler than that one with the "Ya-Ya's" in the title.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    All about the wacky borderlands where reality and invention intersect. But there are no safe demarcations -- no demilitarized zone, no Berlin Wall -- to cue us to which side we're operating in, or that Barris is operating in.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If we now take a woman's right to vote and to hold public office for granted, Suffragette reminds us that it wasn't that long ago when things were different.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    That the fantasy comes crashing back to earth seems all but inevitable. That Rudo y Cursi doesn't crash in the process - that's muy bien.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Ultimately, Somewhere may be too static, too minimalist a tale. But there's grace here.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    Smart, suspenseful, satisfyingly unpredictable.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A meditation on mortality, on loneliness, on the way technology and narcissism have intersected to create a fascinating monster, The Future is all of this and more. What Frank Capra would have made of it, who knows? But he would have liked its star.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Although James and Madden are no Fred and Ginger when it comes time for the fabled ball, her breathy swoons and glitter-splashed décolletage and his personable imperviousness bode well for the couple's future.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Mr. Holmes is about how the past defines us. It is also very much about regret and trying to put things right.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's a good thing not to know where a film is going - we need surprises, we need to be spun around a few times - and Ruby Sparks, which is about a writer and his muse, but then becomes more about the muse and her writer, is happily just such a film.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Thoroughly engaging.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Blissfully, brainlessly satisfying.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    As for the scary business - it is, indeed, scary, delivered with an intensity that will make you think twice the next time you find yourself driving alone, or opening a closet door when no one else happens to be around.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In the engaging Looking for Eric, Loach, the master of British kitchen sink social drama - tries a bit of imaginary whimsy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    That's something else Ridley and his actors do: make you appreciate what a life it was - impossibly short, impossibly brilliant.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This is no-nonsense, let's-get-to-it business, and will probably be less satisfying, and less clear, to viewers unfamiliar with the source material.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Terminator 3 moves at not-quite-breakneck speed, and the shape-shifting, metal-melting special effects aren't exactly spectacular.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The thing's a behemoth. And as the franchise thunders on, it's also becoming more and more a bore.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    What's not to like?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With the likes of Nicholson, Keaton, Reeves and Peet -- and a fleeting, funny few minutes with McDormand -- Something's Gotta Give is never less than entertaining. And once in a while it's sweetly, and extremely, funny.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Moderately compelling and clinical. This isn't "Breakfast at Tiffany's"; this isn't even "Klute."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Moderately scary, moderately amusing, intermittently dull and obvious, Diary of the Dead is not groundbreaking, nor even ground-quaking.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's a harrowing tale, but one that gets phonied up with unnecessary slo-mos, manipulative soundtrack cues, and unrestrained thespianism.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Is Auto Focus a cautionary tale or just a morbid, voyeuristic foray into kitsch and kink? Whatever it is, it's not pretty - it's the cinematic equivalent of soiled, stained sheets. You'll want to run out of the theater straight to a Laundromat.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Meta and messy, Seven Psychopaths does not hang together like "In Bruges."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Bling Ring is Sofia Coppola's energetic, elegant, and entertaining take on this real-life story - a comedy, of sorts, if what it says about our obsession with the famous and the frivolous weren't so totally depressing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is Highsmith, and so things do not go as planned for her protagonists. The Two Faces of January - drop-dead gorgeous to behold - is not a merry tale, but a murderous one. Murderously good.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It looks lovely in an art-directed way, and Eddie Redmayne, who won his Oscar earlier in the year for his portrayal of Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything, looks lovely, too.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Don Jon is about a man's unwitting search for intimacy, for real connection in a world where everyone is connected - by social media, by the Internet, by TV and computer and smartphone screens. That's not exactly an original idea. But Gordon-Levitt goes at it with gusto, and style. Give the guy some props.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Abounds with zero-gravity action ballet, frisky interludes of sapphic foreplay, and weepy drama about doomed love. The film also has an irresistibly kitschy theme song: "Close to You," the treacly Burt Bacharach-Hal David smash by the Carpenters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Jonathan and Christopher Nolan's adaptation of this novel by Christopher Priest offers three acts of exasperating muddle.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Is Spurlock selling out by pulling off this stunt? Is he biting the hand that feeds him? Is he working both sides against the middle? And does he think JetBlue is the best airline in the world? You bet.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Hip Hop Project, a documentary about Kazi and the young men and women he mentors, isn't quite as successful as Kazi himself - a Bahamian orphan and teenage street hustler who turned his life around, and got folks like Queen Latifah, Russell Simmons and Bruce Willis to help out him and his project.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Brings too much of EVERYTHING to the table: It's the cinema equivalent of a long, winding, run-on sentence.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The British star of "Ali G" fame plays Ricky Bobby's arch-nemesis. His name: Jean Girard. His provenance: France. His sponsor: Perrier. Speaking through a set of nasty-looking, tightly clenched teeth in the faux-est of faux French accents, Cohen is hilarious.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    All four performances are strong and nuanced, which makes the film oddly compelling. At the same time, all four characters are hard to like, difficult to care about. They're like car-crash victims in a demolition derby of narcissism and lies.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Kick-Ass has punk energy, ace action moves, and a winning sense of absurdist fun.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a farce with heart, a meditation on identity, family and gender politics that has real faith in its characters - even when the characters themselves lack it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    You get faux feelings -- but faux of the highest, giddiest order.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    And tell me if I'm nuts, but another distraction: Doesn't the BFG bear a striking resemblance to George W. Bush?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It is possible to bring substance, as well as poetry, to the vignette form, but more often Paris, Je T'Aime is merely mundane.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    For Piaf fans, La Vie en Rose is a must-see. For fans yet-to-be, Dahan and Cotillard's film is an opportunity rich with discovery.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Not only eight minutes shorter than its forebear, it's at least eight minutes better - less twee, less chatty, more action, more Elvish.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Another Earth has heft - emotionally, intellectually.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    For all its faults - and there are many, from shameless compression of events to milk the drama for all it's worth, to the gimmicky miscasting of several commanders-in-chief (Robin Williams as Eisenhower is especially egregious) - The Butler is an inspiring and important summation of the black struggle.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Unfortunately, David Koepp - the A-list Hollywood screenwriter (Jurassic Park, War of the Worlds) and decidedly less-successful director (Ghost Town, Secret Window) - can't find the right Looney Tunes-ish tone for his immersion into bike-messenger culture.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Hackman's in it a lot, and he is, as almost always, great fun.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A stage-y but likable ensemble piece.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Don't come to The Amazing-Spider-Man looking for originality.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As solid as Cranston, Leguizamo, Kruger, Bratt, and all the rest are, the built-in constraints of the movie format don't do their real-life counterparts full justice.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This quiet, aching film - punctuated by dead-on music choices, a blues song, reggae, the requisite Leonard Cohen - doesn't answer those questions. It's enough to raise them.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    At once noble and naive, earnest and a tad obnoxious.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Catfish, made on the cheap with digital video, cell-phone cams, and hidden mikes, raises all sorts of questions - about the imaginary realms that open when you click on your computer screen, about cyber-stalking, but also about journalistic ethics.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    I Am Legend is essentially "28 Days Later" . . ., or "28 Weeks Later" . . ., only with millions more for special effects, and with nothing approaching the heart-pounding, bloodcurdling power and smarts of the two British-made yarns.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Very slight and, in the early going, slightly annoying, Coffee and Cigarettes is a long-borning Jarmusch project.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    None of these elements quite come together, and while the clothes and props look authentic, the acting doesn't.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A funny, sad and absolutely lovely film.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Almost absurdly quiet and observant, The Limits of Control is about the space between the action, the steps along the way.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Its dabs of dark comedy and stabs of gore, still rings with a sense of the real. It's electric-charged.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A thinker and an educator, Zinn has led a life of commitment and compassion, and the film offers a loving tribute.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Closer, in the end, lacks a certain heft. The language and the actions of the characters are brutal and devastating. The movie itself, a little too nice.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is a movie about friendship, about foolhardy endeavors that get your adrenaline going and make you feel life buzzing in your toes. Written with wit and concision and remarkable confidence, Bottle Rocket is a joyride worth taking.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    What the three pairs of actors lack in semblance (or resemblance), they make up for to a great extent in their performances.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    My Best Friend, not surprisingly, is about what it means to have friends - and not to have them, to be alone. It's about connection, about trust and vulnerability. That Leconte's little film is a mild-mannered farce, makes the heartache funny, but really, this is serious stuff.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Montenegro's character has a spark in her eye, and a determination, that makes this quiet, intelligent film anything but boring.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Terribly slight and a little off.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Mostly, Not Fade Away is a hit.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Deliberately paced, with an eerie, country-ish score from the Australian singer/songwriter Paul Kelly, Jindabyne is definitely a mystery. But it's not about who killed the woman - audiences know that practically from the outset.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The "black Godfather" comes off as a cold-blooded narcissist whose vision of the American Dream is as twisted as it seems to have been rewarding.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In a way, The TV Set suffers from the same syndrome as the industry it's parodying: bland and compromised, it feels as if it's been fine-tuned and focus-grouped within an inch of its life.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Circumstance is more interesting for its cultural views than for its insights into love, sex, family angst, and rebellious youth.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A gorgeous confection, packed with gargantuan gowns and pornographic displays of pastrystuffs, Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette is also a sharp, smart look at the isolation, ennui and supercilious affairs of the rich, famous and famously pampered.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Kill Your Darlings is a tale of inspiration, then, but also a tale of jealousy, obsession, homophobia, and homicide. It's a whirlwind. Even if it doesn't all hang together, it's worth the ride.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    While the production values are top-notch, and the action artfully choreographed, in the end - and quite well before the end - a sense of tedium sets in.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lacking in subtlety and nuance, Broomfield's nerve-jangling movie nonetheless succeeds in showing the war from various vantage points. And from wherever one's standing, the view is profoundly disturbing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Salt offers a sloppy concoction of story elements from '70s espionage classics - the sinister black ops of "Three Days of the Condor," the nuclear dread of "Fail-Safe," the political-assassination scenarios of "The Day of the Jackal."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    McGregor, playing his lover, is a perfect foil: gentle, funny, magnetic.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    If Mockingjay - Part 1 was walkier and talkier than its forerunners, Part 2 is pretty much all action - and lesser for it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is an indie film with big stars - but also an indie films with big ideas about bringing real people to life.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Apted opts not to show the horrendous cruelty inflicted on thousands upon thousands of captive Africans, shackled and chained, making their way to the Americas in ships. Instead, he has Wilberforce and his fellow abolitionists describe the inhumane conditions - in the precise, passionate language of legislators who believe that human decency is more important than money and power.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    In the end, The Last Kiss holds less a cynical view of the matrimonial state than one of considered irony.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Saving Mr. Banks, set in 1961, is smart, delightful.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An elaborate origins story with more datelines than an issue of Condé Nast Traveler (Oxford! Miami! Argentina! Poland!), X-Men: First Class has some fun trying to explain how Professor X, Magneto, and all those mopey mutants came to be.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Long and lugubrious.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Works the basics with style and intelligence.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    High-Rise feels like a throwback to a time when this kind of social commentary, in literature and film, seemed shocking and true. Not sure whether it's progress to say that in 2016, High-Rise doesn't shock at all.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Gimmicky artifice.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 38 Steven Rea
    Another tale of Tinseltown drugs, sex and excess - has transferred itself to the screen with mind-boggling, laugh-inciting horribleness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Exhilarating and, ultimately, filled with a sense of existential dread.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A first film with a deft comedic touch and a trio of charming stars, Saving Face isn't deep - but it doesn't profess to be.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Illuminating and unsettling.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It is Rapace, the Swedish actress who gained worldwide recognition as Lisbeth Salander in the original adaptation of "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo," who ends up the true heroine of Prometheus.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An old-style mob movie based on a real court case and a real character - a colorful character - Find Me Guilty is about loyalty, family, and a bunch of good fellas.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Made in a forthright, unfancy style and utilizing a cast of born naturals, Washington Heights deftly draws parallels between father and son's complicated relationship and the tensions that pulse through this predominantly Dominican American community.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    No walk in the park, Tyrannosaur is a character study steeped in the British (and Irish) tradition of social realism, and the experience of watching this skillfully made film is, well, exhausting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Your body's sitting there in the theater, but it feels as if your head is someplace else.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Hanna is a goofy and exhilarating mash-up of all sorts of things. Luc Besson's "The Professional" comes to mind, as do the propulsive synth-syncopations of "Run Lola Run" and the dark allegorical menace of Grimms fairy tales.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A love song to the new Europe (Klapisch's original title: Euro Pudding) and a snapshot of a polyglot gang on the cusp of kind-of-reckless youth and responsibility-burdened adulthood.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Pretty magical.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Has a certain captivating quality about it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Footage from VanDyke's travels provides the first-person narrative thrust to Point and Shoot, but Curry's interviews with VanDyke, back in his Baltimore home, are what give the film its larger, more challenging context.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The film turns into a story of corruption on many levels, and it moves fast, without a scrap of fat in the telling.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A heartfelt project, scrappy and engaging, The Way has its way with audiences despite, not because of, its sentimental excess.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The film's save-the-world scenario may be the stuff of crusty cliff-hangers, its imagery may be borrowed, and its jaunty dialogue anything but deep, but there's something exhilarating going on here. It's darn sublime.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Sunshine can be seen as a story about science and religion, about the rational mind and the mad. But at a certain point, like a dying star about to pop into eternal nothingness, the movie can't be seen as anything - it just implodes.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Pacific Rim shares much with the Mexican filmmaker's "Hellboy" franchise - jokey and comic book-y, full of muscular tableaus with huge squads of people coming and going (and running for their lives).
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Loses itself in melodrama, caricature and narrative missteps.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Disconnect is an Eleanor Rigby movie. Look at all the lonely people. A "Crash" for the Internet age, Alex Henry Rubin's topical opus swoops down like an alien spaceship to investigate a disparate group of Earthlings living in close proximity in the suburbs of New York City.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Blood-curdling stuff.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    May not plumb the depths of the female psyche, but it's stylish and frivolous in the most profound ways.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Wanted is head-spinning stuff, and it's easy to get caught up in its masterfully manipulated mayhem. Visually, and viscerally, it's pretty awesome.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    JCVD juggles humor with whomping martial-arts moves and a kind of melancholy star turn from the melancholy, muscular star.

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