For 1,795 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 72% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Ex Machina
Lowest review score: 0 Isn't She Great
Score distribution:
1,795 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Sure, it's a skewed view through adolescent eyes, but it's one that still speaks to the aspirations, agendas, image-making and spin control behind a real, grown-up political election.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Duplicity zips from one elaborate piece of hugger-mugger to the next. But at a certain point (for me, it was Rome), boredom sets in.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The Painted Veil is rich with history and heartbreak. It's stirring stuff.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Cold Souls entertains on its own terms, delivering irony and suspense as Giamatti discovers that his soulless self is a terrible, terrible actor.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Thanks to the evocative cinematography of Ed Lachman, it is bathed in a celestial light that cannot penetrate the existential darkness of its characters.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Her life, and her work, transcended what we think of as "fashion."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The chaos and carnage here is just a pumped-up take on a tradition that harks back to Godzilla, and harks back, of course, to the Marvel comics from which all these heros originally sprang.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    Wickedly smart and wickedly playful, Roman Polanski's adaptation of David Ives' Tony-nominated Venus in Fur works on so many levels, it's almost dizzying.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A fine, inventive '70s period piece about friendship, first love, and growing up to face the hard lessons of life.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Chronicle is full of smart writing that isn't too smart.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Johnny Depp, in bushy eyebrows, sinister mustache, and a suit and hat of fur, may be too cartoonishly lascivious for his own good as the wolf who pursues the girl in the scarlet cape to Grandmother's house. But then he gets to croon the couplet, "There's no way to describe what you feel / When you're talking to your meal." Delicious.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Like Sorkin's D.C.-set TV series, "West Wing," his script for Charlie Wilson's War is full of rapid-fire badinage, with movers and shakers moving smart and shaking snappy as a squad of aides trot along behind, briefcases and coffee cups in tow. A decade - not to mention a war - never went by so quickly.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Succeeds royally at building a sense of apocalyptic dread. It isn't quite so successful at sustaining that mood, and Fessenden resorts to blurry images of totemic spirit forces and stampeding moose specters to get where he's going. And where exactly is that? To a place designed to scare the bejesus out of us planet-pillaging consumers.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a tale of survival and kitsch that will win you over.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Rings true for the most part, and explores human nature - leashed and unleashed - in ways that resonate.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Devilishly delightful.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Even the Rain strikes a deep and resonant chord.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Maybe it's generational: In a movie about teens, it's the teens who should rule. And they do. With certainty. With laughter. And with tears - buckets and buckets.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    One of the problems with the way Mamet resolves Mike's predicament is that it's ridiculously implausible - even in the context of a far-fetched fight story.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    By detailing the allegiance between Tutsi Muslims and Christian Hutus, and the fatwa issued by a Muslim leader forbidding his followers to participate in the massacres, the film is hopeful rather than horrific, even as it describes events of impossible savagery and hate.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Watts gives a deep and Oscar-worthy performance here, displaying the steely composure that made Plame a valued NOC (non-official cover operative).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    For a comedy about autoerotic asphyxiation, epic deception, and shameless exploitation, World's Greatest Dad is a surprisingly sweet and tender affair.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's the dynamic between the three leads, Rawlins, Sives and Henderson - and the young McKinlay, who's like a miniature Shirley Henderson - that is this oddball and bittersweet story's pulsing heart.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Fear(s) of the Dark, a French production, interweaves the shorts, linking the segments together thematically, and narratively.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    McAvoy is charismatic, funny, and on the mark. Hall and Eve are both just right in their roles - bringing depth and detail to what could have been caricature parts. And if Starter for 10 takes a turn into foolhardy tragedy, it doesn't linger too long there.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a study in human behavior, describing how a self-confessed "emotional wreck," through accident and ambition, talent and temperament, became a star.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A disconcerting experience.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Brazen shocker is never less than compelling -- even when you feel compelled to shut your eyes.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Tender but never sappy, Monsieur Ibrahim brings two people of vastly different age and background together in ways that are touching, and telling. It's a small, glowing gem.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Possession, humiliation, jealousy, revelation . . . they're all painted in light, swift strokes by the veteran director and his two stars.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A light and extremely likable comedy -- just what the doctor ordered right now.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Informative, funny, sad and intriguing.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    As entertaining as it is exasperating.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The truth is left for the audience to decide. And while the conclusion isn't necessarily clear, it is unsettling.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    David Ayer, the writer of "Training Day," director of "Street Kings," writer/director of "Harsh Times," does not make movies about princesses with witchy curses, about yuppie commitment-phobes, about talking plush toys. His territory is narrow, but he owns it: cops, in Los Angeles.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The heart of the matter - and the viscera - is the action, and one man's determination to survive. Apocalypto is primal.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    And if there's a problem with Tintin, it's that it's too big and booming.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's giving nothing away to say that Munro makes it to Bonneville, and breaks the record - which apparently still stands - on his two-wheel contraption.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A wise, wistful study of hope and dread.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At a certain point, The Homesman will take you by surprise. By the end, a ferry ride across the Missouri River, it will take your heart.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Fragmented, dreamlike, a whir of memories and misery, We Need to Talk About Kevin is unsettling, but also somehow unnecessary.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Easily the best computer-animated feature to come from Hollywood in a long while, Monster House is also one of the weirdest. A creepy-crawly, freak-show Halloween yarn.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Kari's film, witty and sad, is a spare, small thing, but Noi has a poetry about it, and a poignancy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Bittersweet and funny.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The less said about the twists and turns The Illusionist takes, the better. Suffice to say, Eisenheim's masterful deceptions do not stop when he exits the stage.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A weird fusion of blaxploitation and American indie, built on a template of old-style, follow-your-dream Hollywood drama. But it works - sometimes magnificently.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Odd, and awkward in places, but its lyricism and power stay with you.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Damon, starring in his first full-fledged action pic, brings a determined bearing and believability to the proceedings.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Michelle Williams is a beautiful moper.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Directed with an easygoing grace by Campbell Scott, has the feel of a coming-of-age novel.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Monaghan is stronger still. This is a performance that deserves to be noticed. She is crushingly good.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Client 9 speaks plenty of truth - about politics, power, human nature - even if you don't buy into the hit-job hypothesis.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    It's impossible to imagine anyone, right-leaning or left, coming away from this hugely important documentary unshaken by its representation of the United States and its military establishment.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A shamelessly fun B-movie with A-movie effects.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a wise and endearing little film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Holofcener writes with an ear for the rhythms and ridiculousness of real life, and her cast - to a man, and woman - embraces her words with subtlety and certitude. Friends With Money is gimmickless, and great.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    As it is, most of X2's action is restricted to the Northeast Corridor, with a climactic face-off in the western Rockies, where, in typical blockbuster fashion, everything goes kablooey and ka-bam.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Kafka-esque, Terry Gilliam-esque (Brazil), Charlie Kaufman-esque (remember Floor 71/2 in Being John Malkovich?), and David Lynch-ian, too, The Double plays like a nightmare that will leave you spooked, jittery, and confused. Well, that's how it plays for Simon, anyway. For everyone else, it should leave us simply amused.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    If Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter takes its time, it's time worth taking. The cinematography is lovely: great swirls of midnight snow, frosted trees in glinting sun, the bustling modernity of Tokyo, a big library, subway stations exquisite in their orderliness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Without editorializing, Mermin raises fascinating questions about the cultural impact of globalization, the allure of the West, and the troubled history of an ancient land.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is a story about legacy, the sins of the father, the restlessness in our souls. It's powerful, it's bold, it hits you hard.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The paper's motto is "All the News That's Fit to Print." But all that news doesn't necessarily fit neatly into a 90-minute doc.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    For the casual viewer who feels like maybe all the Sith hoopla is worth checking out, well, it's like tuning in to the season finale of "24" without having watched a minute of its lead-up episodes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This mildly amusing tale of infidelity, blackmail, class differences and corporate greed not only strains credulity - it strains for laughs.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Zooms along with confidence, smarts, and some of the coolest car chases this side of the Indy 500.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Darren Aronofsky's Noah is the Old Testament on acid. It's the movie equivalent of Christian death metal. It's an antediluvian Lord of the Rings, fist-pumping, ferocious, apocalyptic, and wet - very wet.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Like "Hope and Glory," Boorman's Queen and Country finds exhilarating comedy in places usually reserved for drama, violence, loss.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    An ingenious blend of sci-fi and mystery.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Presented with an economy and emotional cool that add to, rather than subtract from, its dramatic impact, The Girl on the Train reverberates with a quiet, seductive power.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    When it works - and it doesn't half the time - it's as if Monty Python were back, putting its merrily imbecilic stamp on the dark world of terrorism.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At the heart of the film, Polley - with her wary, unsure stares, her open smile and beguiling intelligence - is terrific.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Cinema as jazz. More precisely, jazz traded by the likes of Charlie Parker, Billie Holliday, Chet Baker -- blurry, opiated, jagged with melancholy and stone cold beautiful.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Moon is a deceptively simple study of alienation, paranoia, and loneliness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Disturbingly good. The writing and the performances are such that as things go from bad (sad motel-room affairs) to worse (a 4-year-old gone missing), the film's characters get inside your skin, your soul. It's enough to make you want to cry.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's an Alzheimer's allegory, full of humanity, heart, and humor.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In Bruges, at its best, works like "Pulp Fiction" with Irish (and Belgian) accents, digressing into weird discourse and giving a bunch of actors the occasion to shine in small, peculiar roles.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Russian Dolls isn't quite the gem that its precursor was. It rambles. It's less of an ensemble effort. There's more of Xavier's moping self-centeredness. But Duris is terrific as the confused cusp-of-30 protagonist, and the rest of the cast is bright and beaming.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Out-of-control hilarious.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A handsome-looking movie that's full of the muted greens, browns and grays of the tony Hamptons, director Williams' tale never quite finds its footing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An economical thriller, both narratively and budgetarily, Sound of My Voice serves up moments of extreme dread and discomfort, but works a winning undercurrent of playful absurdity into the material as well.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The effectively creepy Stir of Echoes, is enough to make your blood chill.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It could have been more taut, could have been harder, but 25th Hour still resonates with power and poetry.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    "Rebel Without a Cause" with a debate club, Better Luck Tomorrow is a sharp, smart slice of suburban angst among the high school overachiever set.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In The Business of Strangers the right words are hard to come by, but the truth of them -- and the lies -- cut to the quick.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A sappy excursion to Edwardian days.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Disarmingly laid back for this kind of fare, with a jazzy musical score (courtesy of David Holmes) and a sleek, straight-ahead style, Haywire may not make much sense plotwise, but it's a rollicking 90 minutes.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A beautifully strange movie.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    An extraordinarily perfect little film: A bittersweet drama that explores sexuality and love, and their reverberations across the landscape of human emotions.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The screenplay of Open Range, credited to one Craig Storper, is an awesome compendium of cowboy-movie cliches. It borders on parody, and often crosses the border, rustling up a drove of oater aphorisms.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Director Jennifer Yuh Nelson, who oversaw the elegant title sequences from the first film, likewise gives Kung Fu Panda 2's series of flashbacks a different look, harking back to Chinese shadow puppetry and delicate watercolors. With its mix of vibrant CG and classical elements, the movie dazzles.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It also smells very much like a movie with money on its mind - not altogether successfully balancing its loftier ideas with a sense of superficial whimsy and Vegas-meets-Wizard of Oz production design.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    This taut cautionary tale explores the dark side of American politics. And leaves the viewer to wonder - if anyone's still wondering - is there a bright side?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A sloppy, sentimental story line and pivotal plot turns that are only sketchily realized undermine the life-on-the-road misadventures.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This sweet, yet unsentimental film is about growing up, losing innocence, and longing for a place, and people, to call home.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The mostly British ensemble can do this stuff in their sleep, but Macfadyen and Donovan and Graves, especially, work up the necessary antic angst and silliness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Seydoux, no doubt best known for her kickboxing catfight with Paula Patton in "Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol," gives a quiet, watchful performance, suggesting fealty for her lady but also a strong independent streak.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Stranger Than Fiction is slicker than Kaufman's work - and Forster's direction is certainly more studio-ish than Kaufman collaborators Spike Jonze's or Michel Gondry's. But it's a clever idea, and you feel a little smarter watching the thing unfurl.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    As in David Lean's "Brief Encounter," the suspense in Cairo Time comes from what doesn't happen between its pair of "lovers."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Over the Hedge isn't by any stretch bad. It's just banal.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A chick movie? Well, yes, but it's a whole lot cooler than that one with the "Ya-Ya's" in the title.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    All about the wacky borderlands where reality and invention intersect. But there are no safe demarcations -- no demilitarized zone, no Berlin Wall -- to cue us to which side we're operating in, or that Barris is operating in.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    That the fantasy comes crashing back to earth seems all but inevitable. That Rudo y Cursi doesn't crash in the process - that's muy bien.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Ultimately, Somewhere may be too static, too minimalist a tale. But there's grace here.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    Smart, suspenseful, satisfyingly unpredictable.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A meditation on mortality, on loneliness, on the way technology and narcissism have intersected to create a fascinating monster, The Future is all of this and more. What Frank Capra would have made of it, who knows? But he would have liked its star.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Although James and Madden are no Fred and Ginger when it comes time for the fabled ball, her breathy swoons and glitter-splashed décolletage and his personable imperviousness bode well for the couple's future.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's a good thing not to know where a film is going - we need surprises, we need to be spun around a few times - and Ruby Sparks, which is about a writer and his muse, but then becomes more about the muse and her writer, is happily just such a film.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Thoroughly engaging.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Blissfully, brainlessly satisfying.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    As for the scary business - it is, indeed, scary, delivered with an intensity that will make you think twice the next time you find yourself driving alone, or opening a closet door when no one else happens to be around.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In the engaging Looking for Eric, Loach, the master of British kitchen sink social drama - tries a bit of imaginary whimsy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    That's something else Ridley and his actors do: make you appreciate what a life it was - impossibly short, impossibly brilliant.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This is no-nonsense, let's-get-to-it business, and will probably be less satisfying, and less clear, to viewers unfamiliar with the source material.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Terminator 3 moves at not-quite-breakneck speed, and the shape-shifting, metal-melting special effects aren't exactly spectacular.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The thing's a behemoth. And as the franchise thunders on, it's also becoming more and more a bore.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    What's not to like?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With the likes of Nicholson, Keaton, Reeves and Peet -- and a fleeting, funny few minutes with McDormand -- Something's Gotta Give is never less than entertaining. And once in a while it's sweetly, and extremely, funny.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Moderately compelling and clinical. This isn't "Breakfast at Tiffany's"; this isn't even "Klute."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Moderately scary, moderately amusing, intermittently dull and obvious, Diary of the Dead is not groundbreaking, nor even ground-quaking.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's a harrowing tale, but one that gets phonied up with unnecessary slo-mos, manipulative soundtrack cues, and unrestrained thespianism.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Is Auto Focus a cautionary tale or just a morbid, voyeuristic foray into kitsch and kink? Whatever it is, it's not pretty - it's the cinematic equivalent of soiled, stained sheets. You'll want to run out of the theater straight to a Laundromat.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Meta and messy, Seven Psychopaths does not hang together like "In Bruges."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Bling Ring is Sofia Coppola's energetic, elegant, and entertaining take on this real-life story - a comedy, of sorts, if what it says about our obsession with the famous and the frivolous weren't so totally depressing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is Highsmith, and so things do not go as planned for her protagonists. The Two Faces of January - drop-dead gorgeous to behold - is not a merry tale, but a murderous one. Murderously good.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Don Jon is about a man's unwitting search for intimacy, for real connection in a world where everyone is connected - by social media, by the Internet, by TV and computer and smartphone screens. That's not exactly an original idea. But Gordon-Levitt goes at it with gusto, and style. Give the guy some props.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Abounds with zero-gravity action ballet, frisky interludes of sapphic foreplay, and weepy drama about doomed love. The film also has an irresistibly kitschy theme song: "Close to You," the treacly Burt Bacharach-Hal David smash by the Carpenters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Jonathan and Christopher Nolan's adaptation of this novel by Christopher Priest offers three acts of exasperating muddle.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Is Spurlock selling out by pulling off this stunt? Is he biting the hand that feeds him? Is he working both sides against the middle? And does he think JetBlue is the best airline in the world? You bet.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Hip Hop Project, a documentary about Kazi and the young men and women he mentors, isn't quite as successful as Kazi himself - a Bahamian orphan and teenage street hustler who turned his life around, and got folks like Queen Latifah, Russell Simmons and Bruce Willis to help out him and his project.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Brings too much of EVERYTHING to the table: It's the cinema equivalent of a long, winding, run-on sentence.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The British star of "Ali G" fame plays Ricky Bobby's arch-nemesis. His name: Jean Girard. His provenance: France. His sponsor: Perrier. Speaking through a set of nasty-looking, tightly clenched teeth in the faux-est of faux French accents, Cohen is hilarious.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    All four performances are strong and nuanced, which makes the film oddly compelling. At the same time, all four characters are hard to like, difficult to care about. They're like car-crash victims in a demolition derby of narcissism and lies.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Kick-Ass has punk energy, ace action moves, and a winning sense of absurdist fun.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a farce with heart, a meditation on identity, family and gender politics that has real faith in its characters - even when the characters themselves lack it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    You get faux feelings -- but faux of the highest, giddiest order.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The line between ha-ha funny and sorrowful reverence has been crossed - more deftly than you'd think.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It is possible to bring substance, as well as poetry, to the vignette form, but more often Paris, Je T'Aime is merely mundane.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    For Piaf fans, La Vie en Rose is a must-see. For fans yet-to-be, Dahan and Cotillard's film is an opportunity rich with discovery.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Not only eight minutes shorter than its forebear, it's at least eight minutes better - less twee, less chatty, more action, more Elvish.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Another Earth has heft - emotionally, intellectually.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    For all its faults - and there are many, from shameless compression of events to milk the drama for all it's worth, to the gimmicky miscasting of several commanders-in-chief (Robin Williams as Eisenhower is especially egregious) - The Butler is an inspiring and important summation of the black struggle.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Unfortunately, David Koepp - the A-list Hollywood screenwriter (Jurassic Park, War of the Worlds) and decidedly less-successful director (Ghost Town, Secret Window) - can't find the right Looney Tunes-ish tone for his immersion into bike-messenger culture.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Hackman's in it a lot, and he is, as almost always, great fun.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A stage-y but likable ensemble piece.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Don't come to The Amazing-Spider-Man looking for originality.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This quiet, aching film - punctuated by dead-on music choices, a blues song, reggae, the requisite Leonard Cohen - doesn't answer those questions. It's enough to raise them.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    At once noble and naive, earnest and a tad obnoxious.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Catfish, made on the cheap with digital video, cell-phone cams, and hidden mikes, raises all sorts of questions - about the imaginary realms that open when you click on your computer screen, about cyber-stalking, but also about journalistic ethics.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    I Am Legend is essentially "28 Days Later" . . ., or "28 Weeks Later" . . ., only with millions more for special effects, and with nothing approaching the heart-pounding, bloodcurdling power and smarts of the two British-made yarns.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Very slight and, in the early going, slightly annoying, Coffee and Cigarettes is a long-borning Jarmusch project.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    None of these elements quite come together, and while the clothes and props look authentic, the acting doesn't.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A funny, sad and absolutely lovely film.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Its dabs of dark comedy and stabs of gore, still rings with a sense of the real. It's electric-charged.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A thinker and an educator, Zinn has led a life of commitment and compassion, and the film offers a loving tribute.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Closer, in the end, lacks a certain heft. The language and the actions of the characters are brutal and devastating. The movie itself, a little too nice.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is a movie about friendship, about foolhardy endeavors that get your adrenaline going and make you feel life buzzing in your toes. Written with wit and concision and remarkable confidence, Bottle Rocket is a joyride worth taking.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    What the three pairs of actors lack in semblance (or resemblance), they make up for to a great extent in their performances.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    My Best Friend, not surprisingly, is about what it means to have friends - and not to have them, to be alone. It's about connection, about trust and vulnerability. That Leconte's little film is a mild-mannered farce, makes the heartache funny, but really, this is serious stuff.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Montenegro's character has a spark in her eye, and a determination, that makes this quiet, intelligent film anything but boring.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Terribly slight and a little off.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Mostly, Not Fade Away is a hit.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Deliberately paced, with an eerie, country-ish score from the Australian singer/songwriter Paul Kelly, Jindabyne is definitely a mystery. But it's not about who killed the woman - audiences know that practically from the outset.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The "black Godfather" comes off as a cold-blooded narcissist whose vision of the American Dream is as twisted as it seems to have been rewarding.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In a way, The TV Set suffers from the same syndrome as the industry it's parodying: bland and compromised, it feels as if it's been fine-tuned and focus-grouped within an inch of its life.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Circumstance is more interesting for its cultural views than for its insights into love, sex, family angst, and rebellious youth.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A gorgeous confection, packed with gargantuan gowns and pornographic displays of pastrystuffs, Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette is also a sharp, smart look at the isolation, ennui and supercilious affairs of the rich, famous and famously pampered.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Kill Your Darlings is a tale of inspiration, then, but also a tale of jealousy, obsession, homophobia, and homicide. It's a whirlwind. Even if it doesn't all hang together, it's worth the ride.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    While the production values are top-notch, and the action artfully choreographed, in the end - and quite well before the end - a sense of tedium sets in.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lacking in subtlety and nuance, Broomfield's nerve-jangling movie nonetheless succeeds in showing the war from various vantage points. And from wherever one's standing, the view is profoundly disturbing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Salt offers a sloppy concoction of story elements from '70s espionage classics - the sinister black ops of "Three Days of the Condor," the nuclear dread of "Fail-Safe," the political-assassination scenarios of "The Day of the Jackal."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    McGregor, playing his lover, is a perfect foil: gentle, funny, magnetic.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is an indie film with big stars - but also an indie films with big ideas about bringing real people to life.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Apted opts not to show the horrendous cruelty inflicted on thousands upon thousands of captive Africans, shackled and chained, making their way to the Americas in ships. Instead, he has Wilberforce and his fellow abolitionists describe the inhumane conditions - in the precise, passionate language of legislators who believe that human decency is more important than money and power.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    In the end, The Last Kiss holds less a cynical view of the matrimonial state than one of considered irony.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Saving Mr. Banks, set in 1961, is smart, delightful.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An elaborate origins story with more datelines than an issue of Condé Nast Traveler (Oxford! Miami! Argentina! Poland!), X-Men: First Class has some fun trying to explain how Professor X, Magneto, and all those mopey mutants came to be.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Long and lugubrious.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Works the basics with style and intelligence.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Gimmicky artifice.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Exhilarating and, ultimately, filled with a sense of existential dread.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A first film with a deft comedic touch and a trio of charming stars, Saving Face isn't deep - but it doesn't profess to be.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Illuminating and unsettling.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It is Rapace, the Swedish actress who gained worldwide recognition as Lisbeth Salander in the original adaptation of "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo," who ends up the true heroine of Prometheus.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An old-style mob movie based on a real court case and a real character - a colorful character - Find Me Guilty is about loyalty, family, and a bunch of good fellas.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Made in a forthright, unfancy style and utilizing a cast of born naturals, Washington Heights deftly draws parallels between father and son's complicated relationship and the tensions that pulse through this predominantly Dominican American community.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    No walk in the park, Tyrannosaur is a character study steeped in the British (and Irish) tradition of social realism, and the experience of watching this skillfully made film is, well, exhausting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Your body's sitting there in the theater, but it feels as if your head is someplace else.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Hanna is a goofy and exhilarating mash-up of all sorts of things. Luc Besson's "The Professional" comes to mind, as do the propulsive synth-syncopations of "Run Lola Run" and the dark allegorical menace of Grimms fairy tales.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A love song to the new Europe (Klapisch's original title: Euro Pudding) and a snapshot of a polyglot gang on the cusp of kind-of-reckless youth and responsibility-burdened adulthood.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Pretty magical.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Has a certain captivating quality about it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Footage from VanDyke's travels provides the first-person narrative thrust to Point and Shoot, but Curry's interviews with VanDyke, back in his Baltimore home, are what give the film its larger, more challenging context.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The film turns into a story of corruption on many levels, and it moves fast, without a scrap of fat in the telling.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A heartfelt project, scrappy and engaging, The Way has its way with audiences despite, not because of, its sentimental excess.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The film's save-the-world scenario may be the stuff of crusty cliff-hangers, its imagery may be borrowed, and its jaunty dialogue anything but deep, but there's something exhilarating going on here. It's darn sublime.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Sunshine can be seen as a story about science and religion, about the rational mind and the mad. But at a certain point, like a dying star about to pop into eternal nothingness, the movie can't be seen as anything - it just implodes.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Pacific Rim shares much with the Mexican filmmaker's "Hellboy" franchise - jokey and comic book-y, full of muscular tableaus with huge squads of people coming and going (and running for their lives).
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Loses itself in melodrama, caricature and narrative missteps.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Disconnect is an Eleanor Rigby movie. Look at all the lonely people. A "Crash" for the Internet age, Alex Henry Rubin's topical opus swoops down like an alien spaceship to investigate a disparate group of Earthlings living in close proximity in the suburbs of New York City.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Blood-curdling stuff.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    May not plumb the depths of the female psyche, but it's stylish and frivolous in the most profound ways.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Wanted is head-spinning stuff, and it's easy to get caught up in its masterfully manipulated mayhem. Visually, and viscerally, it's pretty awesome.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    JCVD juggles humor with whomping martial-arts moves and a kind of melancholy star turn from the melancholy, muscular star.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Elf
    Pays homage to a sack of Christmas movies, from the department store Claus of "Miracle on 34th Street" to a standing-on-the-bridge-contemplating-suicide moment, a la "It's a Wonderful Life."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The humor and chops are there, but the story isn't quite.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Has a dreamy ominousness about it, and a sorrowfulness that speaks to the artificial intimacies of cellular communication, digital images and dial-up porn.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The movie isn't as deep as it pretends to be, but it does have several nicely unexpected twists going for it. And it has Williams - memorably creepy, chillingly sad.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    And that, in the end, is what Quartet is about: determined engagement, embracing music and theater and the arts, and embracing the friends and loved ones you have around you.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The relationship between Chris and his diminutive namesake is at the core of the film - the determination to be there for his son, no matter what; the mentoring, the pair's goofy, lovely banter. And Smith and his bright-eyed boy pull it off brilliantly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    "March of the Penguins" - phooey! Those smelly little birds are built to survive in the frozen tundra, and nobody's asking them to pull a sled.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Belle, with its country manors and its city slums, its snooty nobles and its fiery idealists, its ballroom dances and barroom conspiracies, brings these themes to a dramatic head: romance and race, privilege and justice.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Has a breezy, Altmanesque air, as it tracks the mini-dramas of its crisscrossing characters.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An entertainingly hairy paranormal affair.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With the exception of a few stakes and crosses jumping from the screen, some bloody sprays here and there, and one creepy, claustrophobic car ride, the 3-D glasses are a hindrance, not an enhancement.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Che
    What this slow-moving but fascinating two-part portrait does do is hunker down in the jungles and mountains of Cuba and (in the second part) Bolivia, capturing in keen, almost Zen-like detail the trudging and trekking, the recruiting and strategizing, the fighting and the philosophizing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    There's something optimistic in the filmmaker's clear-eyed, straightforward storytelling style.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The meaning - and irony - of Kaboom's title doesn't become clear until a beat or two before the end credits roll, and even then it's hard to say what exactly Araki is getting at.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Cusack is especially good in a role that's got more (and less) going on under the surface, while Peet offers up another coltish, trash-mouthed vamp.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    They're not exactly Richard Linklater's "Before" trilogy, but French filmmaker Cédric Klapisch's "Spanish Apartment" movies - 2002's "L'Auberge Espagnole," 2005's "Russian Dolls," and now, Chinese Puzzle - have their devotees, too.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Jolting, suspenseful, full of twisted sympathy for its goons' row of characters, and wickedly amusing to boot, Killing Them Softly summons up the ghosts of "Goodfellas" and a whole nasty tradition of crime pics. And then it lets its ghosts go, whacking and thwacking away.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Much scampering, yelling, quaking and crying is required of the actors, and they acquit themselves well enough, even with oozing fake wounds and prop rebars piercing their shoulder blades.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Although it's pretty much impossible to avoid the cliches and constructs of a war movie, Ayer pushes his actors to find the adrenalized fear, and fire, in their guts. Pitt brings "Wardaddy" alive in ways that put his cartoonish "Inglourious Basterds" Army lieutenant to shame. Lerman's rabbity dread is palpable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If the film itself isn't brilliant, its star most definitely is.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Road isn't a masterpiece...But I cannot think of another film this year that has stayed with me, its images of dread and fear - and yes, perhaps hope - kicking around like such a terrible dream.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Lacks the gimmicky hook that made "Run Lola Run" an arthouse hit, but it doesn't lack for ideas, nor for images that will sweep you up in their boldness and have the resonance of dreams.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A story of obsession and honor, deception and self-deception set against a sharply etched landscape of political upheaval and intrigue. Malkovich orchestrates all this with assuredness, and Bardem, looking weary and worn, inhabits his character with a realness, a truth, that's downright spooky. And beautiful.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Offers a diverting tale of erstwhile indie filmmaking and the power of porn to generate change - both at the box office and in the bedroom.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A spirited, smart-alecky look at the ongoing conflict between a government that wants to eliminate pot and a public that wants to smoke it.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Too bad Chocolat isn't as seductive as its leading lady.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Dumb with a capital D, Blades of Glory takes its (almost) fleshed-out sketch-comedy idea as far as an ice-skating buddy movie with we're-not-gay jokes and a psycho stalker can go.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Dazzling and delirious, The Fall is a celebration of cinema, of old-fashioned storytelling and globe-hopping spectacle.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's more of a character study, insightful and nuanced, about a man grappling with a profound sense of inadequacy, questioning himself. In many ways, We Have a Pope recalls last year's Oscar winner, "The King's Speech": Someone who doesn't feel up to the job fate has handed him, and then struggling to come to terms with it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The movie's too long - and the violence and mayhem are unexpectedly harsh and heavy - but Franco's inspired, looped performance is right up there in the annals of reefer filmdom with Jeff Bridges' the Dude in "The Big Lebowski."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Lieberher, a Philly native transplanted to L.A., is a reed-thin, wide-eyed wonder. There's none of that precocious Hollywood child-actor stuff going on; he's seriously thinking about what he has to say, assessing his words and their implications. It's rare to see any actor - let alone a novice, barely out of the single digits - so readily and naturally displaying inner thought in front of the camera.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's earnest, but it feels beside the point. Blood Diamond's real point: box office.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Doesn't match up against the new millennium martial artistry of "The Matrix," nor do the special effects - but he knows how to establish characters and relationships.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There's a fine line between stupid comedy that's actually pretty smart and stupid comedy that's just dumb, and The Other Guys crosses the line - into realms of unredeeming dunderheadedness - more often than it should.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Supermensch is one of those truth-is-stranger-than-fiction tales.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Moves along the way its leading man walks along - steady and sure.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With a moody overlay of songs supplied by Okkervil River and Shearwater, In Search of a Midnight Kiss also serves as a millennial's answer to Woody Allen's "Manhattan."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Shortbus suffers from a vague, ad lib-y script and a cast that, while hardly shy, isn't exactly charismatic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Grey, whose clipped title, grim swagger, and lost-in-the-outback themes conjure up visions of that Alec Baldwin/Anthony Hopkins classic, "The Edge," devolves into a predictable man-against-nature, and man-against-fellow man, affair.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Fast Food Nation picks up, and drops off, various members of its cast, sometimes without a satisfying resolution. But its final scenes, inside a real working meatpacking plant, on the killing floor, are brutally to the point.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With a thumping score and whirling cinematography, District 13: Ultimatum delivers two or three awesomely choreographed chase-and-fight-and-chase-and-fight-again sequences. The dialogue (in French, with subtitles) is not this movie's strength, nor should it be.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Salvation is severe and bloody stuff.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Tokyo! is a must-see for the Gondry segment, and a strange, diverting pleasure for the rest.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite some fine, nuanced acting (it's Lane's movie, to be sure), Unfaithful doesn't get much deeper than a romance novel.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Monsters, like a serpent eating its own tail, comes back on itself in ways that haunt, and hurt.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The contrast in lifestyles is striking, and I suppose one of the themes that Babies is trying to get at is that despite chasm-wide economic and societal differences, infants are really all the same.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An interesting choice for a Valentine's Day outing, He Loves Me is a weird, bubbly cocktail -- effervescent charm and troubling pathology, shaken together.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Pulls off a neat trick: It's a poignant, sweet-natured love story in which what most of us would call kinky sex - domination, submission, some enthusiastic spanking - is featured prominently, but not pruriently.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Like some murderous version of "Working Girl," the ruthless exec and the seemingly naive underling go at one another - turning the film, at a pivotal moment, into a satisfying whodunit.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Silverman is wickedly fast. Her timing kills.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A taut, tricky thriller.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lost in a time warp of its own doing (or non-doing), Hitchhiker's Guide just doesn't seem terribly original.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A Cat in Paris is thrilling, and a thrilling example of traditional ink and paint cartooning.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A parablelike melodrama with obvious symbolic meaning.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Charming is such an overused, film critic-y designation, but The Way Home is that, and more.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Cooper, who steered Jeff Bridges through his Oscar-winning turn in Crazy Heart, gets fiercely committed performances from just about everyone in Out of the Furnace.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The film, with its painterly juxtapositions of dockside industry, green hills, and cloud-scudded sky, is full of misguided motives and fairy-tale fraud. But it rings true at heart.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Instead of gleaning something from real life, the great minds behind Friends With Benefits slapped their ideas together based on screwball classics, "Sleepless in Seattle" bits, and a keen analysis of Hollywood hackery.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    If there's a psych ward for motion pictures, It's Kind of a Funny Story should check itself in. Boden and Fleck's film suffers from bipolar disorder: manic and silly one minute, moody and muted the next.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An enjoyably trippy Japanese animated feature.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If you love Les Mis the stage musical, my guess is you will love what Hooper and his bustling company have done. But when you hear "Master of the House" and you think of the Seinfeld episode with Elaine's gruff dad belting the tune before you think of those shifty innkeepers the Thénardiers, then you may want to steer clear of this grand endeavor.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Fans of swooping helicopter shots, alleys filled with backlit geysers of steam, and jump-cut editing that makes MTV look like Ingmar Bergman will relish the intercontinental intrigue and huggermugger that is Spy Game.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An engagingly knuckleheaded comic vehicle for former Saturday Night Live trouper Will Ferrell.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There is a lot of finger-pointing. Assertions are made, theories offered, but not much in the way of certainty.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In the wake of the Oscar-winning "The Hurt Locker" - a far better film, and one with a less strident, less obvious agenda - Green Zone arrives looking strangely anachronistic.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A downer of a drama.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Chamber of Secrets -- darker, scarier and somewhat better than "Sorcerer's Stone."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Undertow has the plain, stark, disturbing quality that marked the original "Cape Fear" and "In Cold Blood."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Am I crazy, or are Spring Breakers and "Oz the Great and Powerful" essentially the same movie? James Franco stars in both - a tattooed, gun-totin' gangsta in one, a charlatan magician in the other (you figure out which is which), and, in both, he's encircled by a bevy of Hollywood babes determined either to get witchy on him, or get that other witchy-rhyming word on him.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    Without doubt one of the scariest, creepiest, gut-churningly unsettling pictures to come along in ages.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Like Mickey Rourke in "The Wrestler," Malkovich plays a star long past his glory days in The Great Buck Howard, but continuing to do the only thing he knows. The tone of the two films couldn't be less alike, but the story arc of the central characters graphs the same.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Feels more like a postscript than a probing, provocative documentary.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Although its low-key realism is admirable, Eden doesn't really work: the long silences, the aching stares, the telling props, Breda's quivering blues, Billy's drunkenness, his distraction. There might as well be a sign stuck to the Farrells' front door: Dysfunctional family lives here.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    In many ways, City of Men is like a Portuguese-language version of David Simon's "The Wire."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Forster and his team have also mastered the discreet edit, leaving a lot of the blood, gore, and zombie slime to the imagination. (It's still a pretty convincingly creepy affair.)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A deadpan, dead-on comedy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Poignant, funny and clear-eyed about some tough topics: homophobia, racism, AIDS.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Megamind has momentum and dazzle.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A goofy screwball romp that affords a gaggle of A-listers the chance to hambone around in antic style.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Some tacky animated sequences notwithstanding, Youth in Revolt is smart, cool and frequently hysterical.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Suffice to say it's got plenty to do with corporate karma. And the word severance is more than just a double play on words - it's a triple whammy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A lot of dark, Orwellian fun.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A big, kabooming sequel that plays sleight-of-hand with its audience.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A whodunit, a whydunit, and an excuse for Adrien Brody to mug it up like nobody's business.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    42
    42 doesn't shirk from showing how daunting it was for Robinson to turn the other cheek, as Ford's Rickey tells him he must do, in the face of the insults and hostility.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At a certain point, movies like Disturbia require suspension of belief. To its credit, that moment comes much later in the game than usual. Up until then, like "Rear Window" before it, Disturbia is sly and suspenseful and full of mounting dread.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Despite its familiar formula, feels fresh.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Killer Joe is twisted pulp, and the actors chew on it bravely, boldly, and with varying degrees of success.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A black comedy, a character study, and a thriller, Lord of War lacks the gritty, hell-bent hilarity of David O. Russell's contemporary war pic, "Three Kings."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A quiet, glistening love story - or not-quite-love story - adapted from Martin's novella of the same name, Shopgirl is such an atypical Hollywood affair that it's almost startling.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Luke, who had the title role in Denzel Washington's directorial debut, "Antwone Fisher," is that rare actor who can convey profound inner conflict with just a look in his eye; his performance is attuned, astute and remarkable.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    An entertaining, occasionally illuminating autodocumentary.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Favreau and Vaughn have chemistry to kill: comic, combative and engagingly goofball.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At its heart, there's Blanchett, an actress whose instincts are unerring, and dead-on.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    There's more tenderness in Big Eyes, and a playfully framed but nonetheless emphatic you-go-girl spirit to the proceedings, as we watch Margaret - a magnificent Adams - slowly emerge from her shell.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With creepy sound effects (thuds and clangs and groans, oh my) and a mounting - make that sinking - sense of dread, Black Sea is at once fist-clenchingly suspenseful and, well, dull.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A surprisingly moving drama - a throwback to the small, character-driven indies of yesteryear.

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