For 1,734 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Lost in La Mancha
Lowest review score: 0 A Little Bit of Heaven
Score distribution:
1,734 movie reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Hopped-up and electrifying. The soundtrack is wall-to-wall and propulsive.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's a charmer.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A likably energetic star vehicle for English sports god Vinnie Jones.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Lord knows how Holofcener got the performance she did out of Goodwin, but the child actor's Annie, rude and unmanageable, is an extraordinarily rich and complicated figure.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Remains rooted in the real world, which makes its story all the more satisfying -- and chilling.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    At once guileless and profound.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A sweet but unsticky comedy from Norway that was one of the five foreign- language nominees at this year's Academy Awards.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    An entertaining, occasionally illuminating autodocumentary.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    An extraordinarily perfect little film: A bittersweet drama that explores sexuality and love, and their reverberations across the landscape of human emotions.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is a sad, passionate, beautifully wrought story, and Bardem's portrait of Arenas is at once daring and deeply moving.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Thoughtfulness and artistry ...raise this small, quiet picture to moments of pure epiphany.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A crushingly sad, beautiful film.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A small, beautiful film exploding with big ideas.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    With the filmmaking techniques pared to the bone, it is left to the actors to bring the scenes alive - and they do, often brilliantly.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    With deft and subtle performances and an uncomplicated but savvy script, Autumn Tale gets to the inner lives of its characters.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Bold, ambitious -- and ambiguous.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Devilishly delightful.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    An amiable mix of "Grumpy Old Men" comedy and "Apollo 13" can-we-fix-this-jalopy-before-we-die? Drama.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    In the end, The Last Kiss holds less a cynical view of the matrimonial state than one of considered irony.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This long (nearly three hours), revelatory movie is both a thrilling adventure about endurance and survival, and an elegiac examination of centuries-old tribal culture, fast-fading in the new millennium.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A small but moving film that gets the details right (life in a sleepy burg, sidewalk chats between old high school pals) and gets at the heart of human longing for family, for love.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Sly, sophisticated and surprising.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A compelling existential tableau: sweating bodies, creaking mills turned by numbed oxen, people facing the daily and seasonal cycles of life with little hope of breaking free. Behind the Sun is forceful stuff.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A fine, inventive '70s period piece about friendship, first love, and growing up to face the hard lessons of life.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A devastatingly funny portrait of a wildly dysfunctional clan, Wes Anderson's The Royal Tenenbaums is a movie about how people never really mature in ways that matter.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A story of obsession and honor, deception and self-deception set against a sharply etched landscape of political upheaval and intrigue. Malkovich orchestrates all this with assuredness, and Bardem, looking weary and worn, inhabits his character with a realness, a truth, that's downright spooky. And beautiful.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    To say this bone-chilling, gut-turning feature is "The Crying Game"-meets-"In Cold Blood." But this is a film - writer/director Peirce's first - that matches those pictures in power, in surprise, and in unnerving drama.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A smart, sensuous and sensory mind trip that caroms around a universe of thought.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A mordantly funny, clear-eyed view of an extended family's mounting dysfunction in a changing society.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    To be sure, there are goofy flourishes here, the in-jokey, left-field rummies that are the Brothers Coen's stock-in-trade. But this is altogether a quieter, more philosophical sort of endeavor.

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