For 1,959 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Chicken Run
Lowest review score: 0 The Mangler
Score distribution:
1959 movie reviews
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Directed in steady fashion by Redford, The Company You Keep manages to keep its multiple strands of plot - and the people caught in them - from collapsing in a jumble of confusion. This alone, given the whirl of personal and political history going on, is an accomplishment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 12 Steven Rea
    The movie heads in a disastrous direction: namely, a police academy ceremony... This lets-wrap-this-thing-up moment sucks the life and the honesty out of an otherwise compelling portrait of tainted lawmen, tainted law.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Kinnear does what he's done in the past: You underestimate the guy's acting chops, and suddenly, strikingly, he floors you.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Jeremy Irons slithers on board with a haughty sneer and papal vestments, playing Bishop Pucci.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Moving within its wild and wacky and improbably true scenarios (some of them, anyway) are people you don't really want to know. Stop the presses: War makes people rich. Stop the movie: These people, who cares?
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Equalizer, which reteams Washington with his Training Day director, Fuqua, is an origin story, like the birth of Batman, or Daredevil. If audiences and star are so inclined, it's easy to see this premise and this character - a tough, taciturn gent burdened with regret and a very special skill set - going into Roman numerals.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Too much of the action in Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit takes place on laptops, thumb drives, and video monitors.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    With a clamorous soundtrack and a whirl of elaborate chases and busily choreographed fight scenes, this is Sherlock Holmes with Attention Deficit Disorder.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The perfect film for anyone who likes their headbutting and kickboxing dressed up in gold brocade, frilly collars, and tri-cornered caps. And isn't that all of us?
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Crafty, cutting movie.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Hip, stylish, funny.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Not even Halle Berry, emerging from the blue Caribbean in an orange two-piece -- can bring this thing to life.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Dark Blue World is "Pearl Harbor" without the product placements, without the Hollywood bombast, and certainly without the $100-million-plus budget.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Laceratingly funny Hollywood comedy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Twilight - directed with savvy humor by Catherine Hardwicke - turns vampirism into a metaphor for teen lust.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Fever Pitch works. At times, it works brilliantly.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Represents a brave undertaking on Jolie's part. It's impressively steady filmmaking for a first-timer, and a powerful, powerfully disturbing subject to take on.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A mopey meditation on family and its dysfunctions, Winter Passing is in fact of more than passing interest.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A bizarre counterculture jukebox musical.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Bale brings intense energy (and a convincing American accent) to the proceedings, and the film manages to make this borderline Travis Bickle into a sympathetic character - with a sweetheart, and a sweeter life, beckoning from south of the border. Strong stuff.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    For high-speed action, eye-popping locales, and chopsocky fight-fests galore, watch The Transporter - on video.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A torn-from-the-headlines tale of institutional racism and injustice in the Lone Star State of not-so-long-ago, American Violet might not be subtle, but it's certainly powerful.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It can be argued that Adam uses Asperger's as a kind of metaphor for the barriers that people erect to fend off strangers, to guard against intimacy. It can also be argued that writer/director Mayer is shamelessly manipulative.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Roth, who has taken more than a few cues from Raimi, David Lynch (whom Roth worked with), and George Romero (Night of the Living Dead), is working in a horror tradition that goes way back -- and he's working it with nasty glee.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    On the Road is an honorable homage to the bennies-and-booze-and-bebop-driven hegiras undertaken by the fiercely dedicated anti-establishment duo. But in Salles, screenwriter Jose Rivera and company's effort to get the details right, they only get so far. And it's not quite far enough.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This movie will shake your windows and rattle your walls.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Like "Mr. Holland's Opus," only in French, with an all-boy cast in white shirts and short pants, The Chorus is the kind of sugary, crowd-pleasing fare that only the most curmudgeonly moviegoer can frown upon.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The film doesn't hold together in any compelling way.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The movie pulls off the worst kind of con: the one that disappoints.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Offers two hours of luxury and loveliness, music and art, and a bit of sexually charged madness, too.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A larky throwback to the breakneck screwballs of Frank Capra and Preston Sturges. Problem is, it isn't breakneck enough.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The movie name-drops the cool stuff, the rebels of word and song, but the essence of the story and the cardboard characters who inhabit it are as mundane as can be.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Doesn't have the dramatic heft to warrant all its angst and anguish.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Thoughtfulness and artistry ...raise this small, quiet picture to moments of pure epiphany.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Starts having the same effect as one too many tequilas: the Hong Kong-style stunts, the goofy wisecracks, the foxy presence of Eva Mendes -- all of it becomes blurry and numbing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Non-Stop gets increasingly far-fetched as the jet makes its way across the Atlantic. Certainly, there are more red herrings on the plane than there are in the sea below. And Neeson has to stare down every last one of them.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Nunez's dialogue, and the paces he puts this threesome through, just don't ring true. Coastlines is the stuff of pulp, seriously at odds with what the writer-director has always done best. That is, show the inner workings of people, their needs, their fears, their small dreams.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Mostly, Doremus' movie rings true, as some truly jerky behavior ensues.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Joltingly graphic and atmospheric (Nixey and his crew at least know how to set up a few good shocks), Don't Be Afraid of the Dark fails to involve us in any meaningful way with its characters.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A lot of energy and effort has gone into this endeavor, and I can't say some of it's not fun. But more of it, alas, is just tedious. Say uncle already.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    All nutty, all nonsensical, all aboard.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's all very Hitchcockian, at least for a while. And clever and exciting, too, even if the convergences begin to strain credulity, and, when you think about it, defy logic, too.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Jazzy and colorful, full of men and women in swell clothes driving cool cars, The Rum Diary has a bit of a seedily exotic Graham Greene vibe, and Robinson moves things along at a nice, casual clip, even in the film's more overheated moments.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Breaking and Entering is smart and smartly done, as it describes these inter-circling worlds - the well-to-do Brits and the newly deposited foreigners, trying to shake off their homeland tragedies and start anew.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Eastwood and Morgan's movie, with its epic natural disasters (and a terrifying, man-made one) is optimistic. Hokey, even. But it's beautiful, too.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    CQ
    CQ is a movie for movie-lovers, by a movie-lover: Roman Coppola, son of Francis Ford and a successful commercial and video director in his own right, making a witty, whimsical feature debut.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Has a loose, improvisatory feel that rings true.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Jolie's Maleficent is magnificent.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A great story - and a true one, more or less - Bottle Shock nonetheless fails to deliver much in the way of entertainment.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The movie would pour nicely onto a thick stack of pancakes.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    If Manglehorn is to be remembered at all, it shall be for the excruciating first date that its title character goes on with a chirpy bank clerk he has long been chatting up. Her name is Dawn, and she is played by Holly Hunter.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Dinner for Schmucks goes up in flames. Amusingly, perhaps -- but creatively, too.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Joy
    Joy's entry into the world of entrepreneurship has the crazy trajectory of a rocket gone haywire, and Russell's movie is kind of haywire, too.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Somehow, this rollicking day in the life of a band of skateboarding Latino punk-rockers doesn't exude the voyeuristic smarm of previous Clark forays.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Full disclosure: I saw Monsters vs. Aliens in 2-D. No dorky plastic glasses, no alien ooze flying at my head. More full disclosure: I liked it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Max
    This film is a philosophical musing -- a humanitarian speculation, not a drama about real people, historical figures or not, who seem fully formed.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Strange and gloomy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A sly and surprisingly sublime little noir romance.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Forceful, heart-wrenching stuff.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A Tale of Love and Darkness loses itself in dreamy imagery, in its studiously crafted aesthetic. But there are times when Portman lets the toughness, the tenacity, the emotional heart of Oz's story shine through.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's a hokey piece of melodrama in a movie that cheats its characters - and its audience - out of some emotional truth.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A pumped-up, plotless montage of extraordinary landscapes, colorful wildlife, and interesting people performing feats of derring-do.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    At least an hour of Man of Steel's excessive running time is devoted to the sort of crash-and-burn, slamming-into-skyscrapers CG fight scenes that we've already seen in "The Avengers" and "Dark Knight," "Iron Man," and "Spider-Man." Man of Steel is just the same old same old.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Yes
    Potter explores midlife ennui, (middle-)East-West tension, theology, biology and the irrational nature of romance in this ambitious, if ultimately sketchy, drama.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With so many good Austen adaptations out there (the Keira Knightley Pride & Prejudice, the Colin Firth Pride and Prejudice, Emma Thompson and Ang Lee's splendid Sense and Sensibility), Becoming Jane seems a bit flimsy by comparison.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A silly melodrama.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Cloud Atlas is pop spiritualism, comic-book grandiosity, Zen for dummies. I can't say I didn't enjoy it on some level, but it's not the level of universal wisdom the Wachowskis and Tykwer would have us be on.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Jessica Biel is Vera Miles, the star who had the nerve to get pregnant when Hitchcock wanted her for "Vertigo." He feels betrayed, and she feels relieved, consigned to a supporting role in Psycho as Marion's sister. And Toni Collette, in glasses and a dark wig, is Hitchcock's long-suffering secretary, Peggy. Both Biel and Collette are very good, engaging.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Murray and Linney are terrific together (and apart), their notes pitch perfect, and the supporting cast is good all around.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Pinpointing the era - lovingly - is very much what Dark Shadows' has on its mind. While there's a tangle of romance and vengeance and all sorts of family matters to deal with, Burton's film is really about hippies in bell-bottoms, stoned out in their VW micro-buses.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A Kiwi nerd love story and loopy portrait of Down Under underachievers, Eagle vs. Shark offers a deadpan take on family, friendship, obsession and self-delusion.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Washington offers another of his rock-steady performances, playing a career civil servant with a couple of secrets of his own, but confident, diligent, ready to go the distance for the city he loves.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Smart and gripping - at least until the third act.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In key ways, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas is like Guillermo del Toro's "Pan's Labyrinth": a child, caught in the waking nightmare of one of history's ugliest times, confronting the horrors of a grown-up world, and dealing with them as best he, or she, can.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With border crossings and familiar buddy-cop movie tropes (think Lethal Weapon, think 48 HRS, think The Heat), the Wahlberg-Washington express hits lots of comfortably familiar notes. And more than a few viciously uncomfortable ones, too.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    T Bone Burnett's soundtrack has the appropriate twang to give Wenders' Hopperesque tableaux a nice, filmic poetry. But as arresting as the images are, Shepard's clunky, soap-opera banter brings most everything, and everyone, crashing down to earth.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Mr. & Mrs. Smith kicks off with panache and star power - and quickly wears out its welcome.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This based-on-real-life tale of artistic aspirations and international politics is packed with more corn than an Iowa silo.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Isn't the whole handheld "real-video" thing kind of old by now? Isn't the Shyamalanian-twist thing kind of old by now, too?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It would be curmudgeonly to count all the ways in which The Hundred-Foot Journey is unsurprising, unrealistic, unnecessary.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Baked and half-baked, Tenacious D does manage to give the term potty humor a new meaning. That's some kind of genius, right?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At times soppy, sentimental and shamelessly romantic, at other moments bursting with clever barbs -- and now and then zooming in on something telling and poignant -- Love Actually is just about impossible to dislike.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Beloved spans 45 years, shifting from Paris to Prague to London to Montreal, and it boasts an especially strong performance by Paul Schneider.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Promised Land is a frustrating film to watch. It should be better than this, smarter than this.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's a vivid way to contextualize Hypatia's astronomical musings, but it's kind of out there, too.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's no adroitness, no grace in the handling of the pitching emotions - funny, sad, icky - that such a story presents.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Olyphant has a cool, amiable vibe, kind of postmodern Jimmy Stewart, while Mitchell brings intelligence and quietude to yet another role that doesn't deserve such consideration.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There are big, jaunty gusts of music, and there are big, jaunty gusts of acting: the Heath Ledger-esque Alexander Fehling pumps up his Johann Wolfgang von Goethe with brash, boyish verve and stormy emoting.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Offers a worshipful but insightful portrait of the group - centered, of course, on its charismatic front man.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Not everyone's cup of tea, but a strong, heady brew.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As stories go, The Astronaut Farmer is engaging, even if it serves up a kind of Plains State brand of Rocky-esque hooey.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Gritty and compelling up to a point, but cheaply exploitive as well.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lacks an essential sense of purpose.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Doesn't overdo it on the 1950s period charm -- lots of tweed, old cars and bikes, great woolly sweaters and painted rowhouses -- and the performances never get out of hand, even when the plot does.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Invincible works, simply but provocatively, as a parable about the oppressed and the oppressors, victimhood and fanaticism.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Facing Windows is rich stuff. Maybe too rich. But thanks to fine performances and a grounded script, the pieces of this intriguing little puzzle all manage to fit.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Just misses being great. The dark shaman mysticism doesn't entirely mesh with the earthbound quest across the wild and glorious Southwest. And the ending, with its shoot-outs and sacrifices, has a choppy, unneccessarily complicated feel.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's not just Hollywood convention that gets in the way of the story, it's the lack of depth, heft and heart at its core.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A satisfyingly screwy New York story.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    If only the screenplay had more going for it than hackneyed homilies and living-in-the-ghetto stereotypes. If only first-time director Sunu Gonera had a surer hand, a knack for something bolder, wilder, goofier.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Not as consistently or uproariously funny as "American Pie," but it does have a Zen zaniness that gives it center as well as edge.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    An overobvious and underwhelming satire about American consumerism run amok.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There are so many things wrong with Luhrmann's Great Gatsby - the filmmaker's attention-deficit-disorder approach, the anachronistic convergence of hip-hop and swing, the choppy elision of Fitzgerald's plot, the jarring collision of Jazz Age cool and Millennial cluelessness. But at the crux of things, the problem is that it's impossible to care.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Has a glorious good time satirizing the extravagant lengths to which the military and intelligence establishments will go if they think there's a payoff at the other end.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    For all its visual delights, Magic in the Moonlight, the 44th feature written and directed by the admirably industrious Woody Allen, has to be one of his bigger duds.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite the charismatic efforts of the British actor Ahmed, The Reluctant Fundamentalist gets bogged down in proselytizing and plot.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Oh so slight and forgettable.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The momentum Stiller has built up - his character's globe-trotting derring-do, the care and consideration on display in his directing - carries the movie a long way. Falling short of fantastic, The Secret Life of Walter Mitty is still a fantasy to enjoy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With its rebellious themes and pharmaceutical props - Ritalin, Prozac, Xanax all get doled out - Charlie Bartlett isn't going to win any awards from parent-teacher groups. But the underlying message of the film, with its nods to "Catcher in the Rye" and - '70s throwback here - "Harold and Maude," is a good one.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Throw in some business with the CIA, add a small army of Serbian thugs and a mysterious Croatian beauty, and The Hunting Party picks up speed, careening through the forests where the Fox may or may not be hiding out. Whatever fate awaits, it can't be good. But it can be fun.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's all head-spinning and lovely - and a little exhausting, too.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    One of the problems with The Dark World is that its monsters and angry armies and visual effects are interchangeable with Peter Jackson's Tolkien pics, with Clash of the Titans, with The Avengers, with Man of Steel, and on and on. These superhero movies. These Middle Earth movies. These mythic god movies. It's getting hard to tell them apart.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Almost certainly, The Last Stand will not be Schwarzenegger's last. For better or for worse (and this is somewhere right in the middle), he is back.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Ultimately, it's the romance that feels forced and phony, not the group meetings, the confessions, the anguished moments alone.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Now in his late 40s and hairier than ever, Jeremy seems a simple enough, likable guy, and he has no pretensions about what he does. And no apologies either.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Clones makes the Frodo-speak of "Lord of the Rings" sound like Noel Coward.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A sleek little meditation on beauty, desire, love and time. Now and then, it's fairly sophisticated stuff.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Effie Gray is peculiarly compelling, even if the issue of sexual repression, all the Victorian manners, seem light-years gone and close to unfathomable.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A lush, lovely snooze-fest.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Finally - and the news should really come as a relief - here is a role Streep should not have tried, in a movie that should not have been made.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The dialogue rings tinny in the ear, as if enunciated in the phony arc of a stage light.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Puccini for Beginners, which takes its title from its heroine's passion for opera, isn't just another trendy toe-dip in sexual experimentation. It may not be the real world of New York, or even of most relationships, but it's worth a visit.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Steven Rea
    Feels stagy, stiff and entirely unnecessary.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A goofy combination of screwball farce and Dogma-style verite grit and gloom.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    There's whimsy and raunchy humor here, but also an underlying sense of darkness and despair.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Bobby has its heart in the right place (on its sleeve). But it doesn't have its screenplay anywhere - or at least, anywhere near the heft that its subject demands.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Yea or nay, love or hate, the portrait that Streep delivers in Phyllida Lloyd's impressionistic biopic is astonishing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    By the end of the film, Leo is beginning to sound suspiciously like HAL in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Robotic, and more than a little peeved.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This is one of the smarter, more honest scripts to be filmed in quite some time. And Jenna Fischer, star of "The Office," gives one of the smarter, more honest - and vulnerable, and tough - performances by an actress on the big screen in an even longer stretch.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With his sleepy, So-Cal inflections, Costner is an actor who summons urgency and drama with, well, I'm not sure exactly how he does what he does. He's the least dynamic of stars, but still, he is one.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    As funny as it is sick (and it's plenty of both).
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Rock Star sinks into a morass of melodrama.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It has enough buzzing wit and eye-popping animation to win over the kids - and probably more than a few parents, too.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Students of sound design and horror-movie scores should see - or hear - Closer to God, which elicits more creepy scares than its transparent plot warrants, thanks to an unsettling audio mix and pulsing, percolating music from Thomas Nöla.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The big shift between Carpenter's B-movie and filmmaker Jean-François Richet's comic book-style remake is that instead of a troop of bloodthirsty gang members encircling the precinct, the bad guys here all look like good guys.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Signal is a road movie turned upside down and inside out.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Vacancy, in the end, simply offers a particularly aggressive brand of couples counseling.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Deadpan and a bit dopey, Brooklyn Brothers Beat the Best has a shaggy charm, and the chemistry between the tuneful twosome's would-be Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty makes up for the inevitable rock-and-roll road movie cliches.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's a lot of rambling and shambling going on in these overlapping stories, often to the point where Explicit Ills no longer feels like it has a point.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At its best, the film is undeniably tender. Sweet, even.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Fast, funny.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A woefully thin and pointless musical comedy boasting the no-chemistry coupling of Cuba Gooding Jr. and Beyonc?
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The tiny, intrepid rodent is so cute it's impossible not to ooh and aww, just looking at him. Which is a good thing, because you'll need something to get you through the long stretches of fairytale pastiche that make up this overwrought yarn.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's more voyeurism going on here, and less insight into a certain culture (the young and the wasted), than the filmmakers would probably admit to, but the performances are scarily real, and the outcome, well, is just scary.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Decidedly loopy and nonlinear, Mister Lonely is precious and artsy, but there are moments when Korine's, er, unique vision brings something bold and beautiful to the table.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A charmer.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It's old, old hat.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    While it flirts with "After School Special"-ness, at least has the courage to address racial and cultural cliches with a degree of honesty.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Then Death feels the need to intrude again. And again. If his accent weren't so charming, his voice so resonant, it would be depressing, all this meddling and mortality.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Tautou, who looks even smaller and more fragile alongside her towering leading man, conveys the hurt and hesitancy that are pulling at her character's heart - and does so with seeming effortlessness. It's as though she knows this woman, deep down.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Carpenter, an old hand at this horror stuff, delivers some convincingly creepy effects, but the narrative lacks any sustained dramatic pulse - its gallery of hallucinogenic scenes doesn't add up to much more than, well, a gallery of hallucinogenic scenes. [03 Feb 1995, p.5]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Steven Rea
    Sitting in the theater, watching Knight of Cups, you hear an incredible amount of thought-balloon babble, but you don't hear anything approaching the sublime.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Whether or not the story makes any sense, The Promise promises to transport - and does.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Fans of Brooks and his wry, dry neuroticism will not be disappointed as he whines and whimpers around New Delhi.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Unravels a bit heading toward its finale, as buildings explode and characters are forced to explain themselves and their nefarious motives. But the payoff at the end - at once kind of radical and gratuitous - delivers a wallop.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Scott's reimagining of the legend of Robin Hood has more heft than it does humor, more soulful brooding than snappy thrust-and-parry retorts.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A yawning affair that would be a perfectly fine video rental but doesn't really require the big screen.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Several notches above the usual gay-themed indie, and mostly manages to avoid -- or at least legitimately deploy -- the gratuitous throbbing beefcake scenes that are part and parcel of the genre.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    If only RocknRolla's characters were at all believable - even in the context of its own cartoon universe.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A whimsical tale of serial murder in the English countryside, Keeping Mum benefits immensely from the charm and pitch-perfect gravitas of Kristin Scott Thomas.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lacks the origin-story freshness of its predecessor (even if the inaugural Garfield Spider-Man came only five years after the final installment of the Sam Raimi-directed Tobey Maguire Spider-Man trilogy). It lacks a charismatic central character, too.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Hysteria is a romantic comedy, not an erotic one.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Parental units who manage to remain conscious through the kiddie-centric proceedings can either savor, or groan at, Malkovich's bespectacled Octavius barking punny, celebrity name-dropping orders to his minions.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Directed by Terrence Malick's editor and protégé, A.J. Edwards, The Better Angels abounds with Malick-ian moments: upward-pointing cameras capturing bodies wheeling through fields, plaintive voice-overs punctuated by Jew's harp and birdsong, a tendency to drift toward the sky and its moody tableau of clouds.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    War is hell, war is cruelty, war is toil and trouble, war is just a shot away. But is war a snooze? Well, by the time Enemy at the Gates has run its course — it sure seems that way.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 53 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The Killer Inside Me is tough, disturbing stuff: We're tagging along with a sociopath as he explains himself, reveals himself, works things out inside his head.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Rocker can be amusingly dopey, with its "Spinal Tap"-ish lampooning of rock idioms - and idiots.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It's a sorry spectacle, watching garden gnomes being robbed of their dignity.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This is more than the story of soldiers grappling with stress and doubt as they reenter the "normal" flow of domestic life. It's about strangers bonding, about friendship and discovery, about the comedy and tragedy of the human experience.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Epic piffle.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    O
    Stripped of its poetry, some of the devices of the tragedy of the Moor come off here as woefully contrived.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Steven Rea
    A fairly dreadful melodrama drenched in self-pity.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    lLght and likable - a low-budget "Steel Magnolias" without pretense.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There are tiny glints of humor and intelligence at work, and the action and animation rockets along slickly and stylishly. But unlike the protagonists of almost any and all of the Pixar titles, Astro Boy's namesake lacks even an iota of soul.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A long, tedious and convoluted follow-up to 2003's rollicking high-seas hit, The Curse of the Black Pearl, this second installment in the promised trilogy lacks the swash and buckle of the original. And then some.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The movie's combination of unabashedly fun carnage, cool special effects, and tongue-in-cheek dialogue keeps the ball rolling (albeit at reduced speed), until the last of the titular terrors has bit the dust.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    John Dies at the End isn't deep. But it is deeply amusing, in the sickest possible way.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If you're going to take another stab at this tale of a taunted, traumatized teen who exacts fiery revenge on, well, everyone, then Kimberly Peirce is the director to do it.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's not easy being macho while you're shivering like a frozen puppy, but Kutcher pulls it off.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    In Time is that kind of movie: Philip K. Dick for knuckleheads.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    DePalma's movie offers its own doctoring and processing, without delivering an ounce of real humanity - good or bad - in the bargain.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Tomorrow Never Dies sticks to the Bond formula without bringing anything new, or particularly inspired, to the proceedings. (Besides a lot of shameless product placement, that is.)
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A roiling, boiling mix of blaxploitation, sexploitation, Tennessee Williams and the Tennessee outback.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    At best diverting, at worst an almost self-parodic compendium of French film cliches.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's not that Fay Grim isn't amusing. It is, in that deadpan, skewed way that indie auteur Hartley's pics always are. But there's not much else going on here.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A cartoon that's truly cinematic in scope, and a story that's compelling and heartfelt - even if the heart belongs to a big, four-legged herbivore.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Next Three Days is genre fare - no pretensions, no nonsense.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A likable, low-budget high school comedy.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The real problem isn't with the actors, it's with 1) the source material, a highfalutin romance novel with a clever literary conceit, and 2) LaBute's clumsy, uncomfortable efforts to telescope Byatt's book into a workable movie.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Alas, something happened on the book-to-screen operating table: Yes, Running With Scissors is rich, twisted, insane, mordant and ridiculous, but it is not funny. Not at all.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    If your idea of a fun night out is to be manipulated by freaky sound effects, jumpy edits, and point-of-view shots of ceiling fans whooshing menacingly, Insidious is the film for you.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Easily the trippiest and goofiest of the five addled adolescent vampire romances based on the Stephenie Meyer books.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    As for Bale, he seems to have lost his compass. His accent strays, his famous intensity wasted on clunky dialogue.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Filmmaker Kormákur orchestrates all this with broad strokes and winking intrigue, although the line between hambone melodrama and irony-tinged satire gets walked across a few too many times.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A charmingly off-the-wall little tale. Black doesn't do anything he hasn't done before (in fact, he's already done his remake of King Kong!).
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Casa de Mi Padre is at its best (a relative term, mind you) when it's at its silliest and most surreal.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    300
    300 is "Gladiator" for the gamer set.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A gloriously tacky horror movie with an inclination toward the occult, The Mother of Tears hails from the Italian schlockmeister Dario Argento, who photographs his Euro movie star daughter, Asia Argento, with something more than paternal pride.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Heartfelt and artfully shot, the movie - with little Rodrigo Noya, wearing big eyeglasses, in the title role - is too sweet for its own good, even as some of its characters do things that aren't terribly sweet at all.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A wholesome little drama aimed at the pre- and early-teen crowd.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    For genre geeks, this can be fun - although nothing in Scream 4 is quite as clever as the filmmakers seem to think it is.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This ninth installment in the Marvel mutant superhero franchise is rife with urgent and (dare we say?) apocalyptic comings and goings, with characters and confrontations that seem at once familiar and befuddling.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Alas, it's a throwback that's thrown its back out - limping along, trailed by battalions of stereotypes and ammo rounds of cliche.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Where "Run Lola Run" was like a perpetual-motion machine, The International seems to forever be stopping in its own tracks. Tykwer takes coffee breaks to explain the convoluted and dicey plot.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Black's caped "luchador" grows on you. Like a fun guy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Most parties concerned maintain their grim countenances, their characters struggling to find the sweet spot between honor and greed, between doing the right thing and doing the absolute worst.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The real problem is that there's nothing to George but the movie's props.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 52 Metascore
    • 12 Steven Rea
    Somnambulistic pacing, kerplunkingly unfunny jokes, and mugging thespians making fools of themselves. Truly torturous spectacle.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Easy to like, and easy to forget.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Safe House rockets along, taking a familiar formula and making it work - hard.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A likable if not exactly groundbreaking comedy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It is a yarn. But it's so full of passion, poetry, and humor that it becomes, for the time, quite real.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    RoboCop is a solid near-future action pic that poses moral questions about artificial intelligence and remote-control combat systems without getting too preachy or ponderous about it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Dreamy and impressionistic, full of debauchery, drugs, disco, and dazzling couture, Saint Laurent is a biopic that picks its moments, leaving backstory behind.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Beautiful Creatures tries terribly hard to establish its own mythology of magic and witchcraft and Southern-fried adolescent angst. This isn't Hogwarts, though, and it's not even Forks High from Twilight, but boy, you know Warner Bros., the studio behind Beautiful Creatures, wants it to be!
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    There'd be a lot less strife and starvation, disease and dread, if Nancy Meyers ruled the world.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If Weitz's Golden Compass feels, at times, too crammed with exposition and big set pieces, the film nonetheless works far more successfully than the first Potter pic - the leaden "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" - did translating its source material.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Tunney, brimming with coltish, neurotic energy, holds the screen like a true star. She brings the role, and the movie, to life.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A big comedown from "The Fighter," Contraband finds Wahlberg in default mode: With his Popeye biceps and broody stares, the actor can do a character like Chris without even thinking about it - and that's what he does here.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    If The Brothers Grimm flies apart like a badly designed airplane (and it does), it still has more going for it than most of the movie fare this summer.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    All manner of subplots weave their way through the film, which teems with "colorful" characters and saccharine cliches. But, like the first film, it's next to impossible not to find diversion in the company of such stalwarts as Dench and Nighy and Smith. And George Thorogood is, happily, never heard from again.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As a meditation on the vicissitudes of love, on the need for people to connect, and the struggles that come by both making and missing those connections, the movie is wading-pool deep.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Has an empty, soulless feel.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    That's kind of the aesthetic that Stanton is going for: over-the-top pulp. But there's something generic about the digitally rendered Martians, and there's a corniness to the dialogue that keeps the audience from any kind of emotional attachment to the Tharks and Zodangans and their ilk.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    No great shakes, The Baxter nonetheless has a quiet loopiness going for it. And it has the absence of a laugh track going for it, too.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Peter Jackson devotees may not like to hear this, but Jack the Giant Slayer is far more accomplished, visually speaking, than The Hobbit: An Unexpected Snooze, I mean, Journey.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Alternately tedious, cliched and unintentionally funny.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Although it often feels like a company-bankrolled promo film, A Lego Brickumentary answers all the questions both Lego novices and Lego nerds would want to know.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Directed by veteran stuntman Ric Roman Waugh, Snitch is shot with a mix of nervous close-ups and weirdly vertiginous angles.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A moody cyber-noir with not much on its mind but looking good, Blackhat is a must-see if you like your dialogue (romantic, dramatic, subtitled Cantonese) peppered with techspeak.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Dumb, dumb, dumb - borrowing scare tactics from Hitchcock and other suspense masters, but forgetting basic story.telling essentials such as character development and logical exposition.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Tonally, Casino Jack is all over the place: exaggerated comedy, cartoonish high jinks, then heavy-handed melodrama (a third-act face-off between Abramoff and his wife, played with no center of gravity by Kelly Preston, comes out of nowhere).
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Filmmaker Maria Sole Tognazzi is going for a quiet, thoughtful character study: a modern woman, sure of herself, but still trying to come to terms with her place in the world.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Finding Amanda isn't bad, and there is some smart, jagged humor.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Intermittent moments of mild amusement ensue.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The transformation of Reynold's lawyer from a bumbler and stumbler to a victorious litigator, sticking it to an entire nation, is the stuff of a Frank Capra/Jimmy Stewart pic.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's totally down-to-earth, as real as a trip to the supermarket.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Shameless in every way imaginable, Me Before You milks the pathos for all it's worth, but milks the comedy, too.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 25 Steven Rea
    Has to be one of the nuttiest, sappiest (literally), most unintentionally hilarious spectacles to come down the time-travel turnpike in eons.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Michael Elliot, the Philadelphia native who wrote Just Wright as a vehicle for Latifah - and who was on set for most of the shoot - says that Common's earnestness, and eagerness, and his sense of responsibility in carrying the movie, were palpable.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An OK sports doc that owes as much to reality TV competitions as it does to the genre of nautical cinema.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A thoroughly satisfying mix of mayhem and mindless fun.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A wonderfully crafted, smartly acted study of a complex old coot.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's lots of zero-g action in Ender's Game - even old Han Solo takes a whirl.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The film is at once shamelessly transparent, manipulative, and far-fetched, and impossibly suspenseful. You'll want to take a shower afterward - that's how icky you'll feel.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 25 Steven Rea
    Maybe, you think, there is something daring and brilliant going on here: an excursion into the darkest territories of the human soul. But no. In the end -- or the beginning -- there is no point to all this. Or at least not a point worth making, and making us watch.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Clunky and unsurprising.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Quite possibly the biggest ego trip ever to play Cannes, or anywhere else, at any time.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The fundamental problem with The Night Listener is the manner in which the boy, Pete, is depicted. Rory Culkin gets the tricky job of bringing the role to life, and he does it well, but it's still a trick. Or is it?
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Diaz gets her own voice-over monologue, as does Patric - the different points of view functioning like stanza refrains, born in shared familial anguish.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    While Ferrell and Reilly are great together, hatching harebrained schemes that have no basis in reality, part of the unexpected treat of Step Brothers is watching Jenkins and Steenburgen sink to such blithely immature levels of rude and crude comedy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Steven Rea
    The violence is plenty, and pointless.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Shot on the cheap, with cheesy animated credits and comic-panel "Bams!" and "Pows!" splashed across the screen, Super has a jokey, low-rent quality (or lack of quality) that could be endearing, if Wilson's performance weren't so nihilistically dull, and if there were somebody in the picture who had a soul.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    There's a xenophobic element to Taken's premise, to be sure - the idea that travel, even to Western Europe, isn't safe for Americans, and that foreigners (Albanians, Arabs) are by nature shifty and sinister.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Stevenson is big and swarthy and not altogether without credibility, but he's got as much charisma as a potato.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As a character study, City by the Sea is engaging. As a police thriller, it's not all there.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Never mind the facts. True Story, slick and shaky, doesn't know where the truth lies.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    After toiling for the likes of Ridley Scott, Ron Howard, and Peter Weir all these years, Crowe takes command of his own camera crews and castmates, mounting an ambitious and sentimental period drama.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Compelling, kinetic, fast and furious.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Offers a sometimes lyrical, sometimes gut-turning portrait of war seen through the eyes of children.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Director John Crowley trots his crew around London, working up a suitable amount of suspense. And paranoia.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It lacks the resonances of Gilbert's book.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Flipping his cigarette lighter and snapping deadpan retorts, Reeves plays the demon-hunting detective with Keanu-esque panache.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Little White Lies wants to capture something momentous and meaningful in these people's lives. But ultimately it's hard to care.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Dedication works anyway, thanks to Theroux's jumping visuals and Crudup's jumpy performance.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Steven Rea
    Hoffman's turn as the drag queen has its endearing and comically catty moments, but Flawless' utter phoniness subsumes all efforts at honest acting.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Steven Rea
    Duplex's tenant-from-hell scenario is as predictable as it is tedious -- a tinny, unsatisfying throwaway farce.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Birth makes its oddball supernaturalism seem completely, compellingly real.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It says in the beginning of the film that Two for the Money is "inspired by a true story." Problem is, it's just not that inspired.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Aniston and Zahn are sweet together - their respective characters have built up psychic armor to keep the outside world at bay, and each breaks down the other's in revealing ways.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Relying on improv-y riffing and watch-them-coming-from-down-the-block-and-around-the-corner sight gags, The Campaign is intermittently amusing, but more often just interminable.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The Island could be read as a metaphor for societal ills (commercialization, conformity, pharmaceutical overkill) if it weren't so shamelessly dumb. And dumb it is.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Gretchen Mol stars as a 35-year-old virgin deflowered in lusty romance-novel fashion on a trip to Mexico. Her hunky lover-boy's name? Jesus Christ (played by Justin Theroux). The segment? "Thou shalt not take the Lord's name in vain."
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Flat and predictable.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There's nothing hip or ironic about Poseidon, which makes Russell and Lucas the perfect leading men.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's a great movie out now about magicians, sleight-of-hand maestros, illusionists, card and coin tricksters. Now You See Me is not that movie.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    How bad is Prince of Persia? Whether or not director Mike Newell is to blame, the action sequences lack verve and scope.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Neither fish nor fowl (nor extraterrestrial), and that's a problem. Craig, handsomely craggy, plays it straight, and like Eastwood's Man With No Name, he doesn't have much to say.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Simplistic and jingoistic. But it's also explosively fun.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The trouble with Alfie - apart from the film's existence, and the wrongheaded idea of remaking a minor classic - is that not a soul is likable.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There's not a believable character, nor line of convincing dialogue to be found.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A testosterone-fueled road movie that displays the same Apatow-ian obsessions, and raunch, as "Pineapple Express," "Superbad," and "The 40-Year-Old Virgin."
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    For all its flaws, offers an enjoyable look at the machinations of moviedom and fame, and a look into a future where what is real and what isn't becomes scarily blurred.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Steven Rea
    Tobey Maguire, terribly miscast and squeaky (that voice - it belongs to a kid!).
    • 49 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Filled with bleak, beautiful Hopperesque tableaus and strange characters whose lives intersect.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Burns' movie shows a Woody.esque affection for a certain slice of New York and its denizens (with the angst and neuroses quieted down a notch or two).
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Is Final Fantasy decent sci-fi? Yes, more than decent.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In some ways, American Reunion is the Charlize Theron indie "Young Adult" all over again: In both, a small-town high school reunion is the setting for a lot of nostalgia and narcissism and nasty behavior.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Eva Longoria brings a crisp swagger and fluent Spanish to her role.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    For sheer audacity and adrenaline-fueled carnage, Shoot 'Em Up hits its target pretty much dead on.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Wahlberg does what Wahlberg does, bringing muscular conviction to his troubled, tough-guy role. The city may be broken, but the movie star's formula is working fine.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Too long (and it sure ain't taut), but it brims with passion.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It isn't frightening. Sometimes, in fact, it's laughable.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A dark-and-stormy sci-fi shoot-'em-up directed by McG, T4 has enough hardware and havoc to satisfy the crowd of action junkies and gamers who sped to "X-Men Origins: Wolverine" on opening weekend. (Terminator Salvation is a couple of liquid metal drops' more satisfying, but only a couple.)
    • 49 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A rollicking tale of rehabilitation and redemption, rife with cool special effects, Hancock is smart and surprisingly raunchy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Steven Rea
    I'm ripping up my Lars Von Trier fan club card.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Steven Rea
    Art-directed within an inch of its life, Sleuth has the smirky gloss of a project that everyone involved with thinks is terribly good, and terribly clever. These people - Branagh, Pinter, Law and the usually great Caine (even in bad stuff) - are laboring under an epic misconception. Sleuth is just terrible.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    MacDowell brings an absolutely riveting conviction to her role. She's strong stuff in a movie that is likewise gripping and powerful.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A kind of Tracy/Hepburn rom-com with a "Dead Poets Society" backdrop and dollops of human failing for added drama, Words and Pictures stars Clive Owen and Juliette Binoche - a matchup that makes you want to like Fred Schepisi's film, even when it becomes impossible to do so.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Boasts exciting competitive track cycling footage.

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