For 1,975 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Wendy and Lucy
Lowest review score: 0 A Little Bit of Heaven
Score distribution:
1975 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Guadagnino, who directed Swinton in the 2009 Italian gem "I Am Love," has kept the core premise - and the sensuality - of Jacques Deray's original. (Delon and Schneider go skinny-dipping, too.)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    High-Rise feels like a throwback to a time when this kind of social commentary, in literature and film, seemed shocking and true. Not sure whether it's progress to say that in 2016, High-Rise doesn't shock at all.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Smart and gripping - at least until the third act.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Francofonia is a brilliant meditation on art, on war - and what happens to art when nations go to war.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With Sarandon in the title role, Scafaria has a winner: The actress tackles Marnie headlong, with heart and soul, trolling the fancy outdoor shopping mall for products to buy and for people to intercept and hang on to.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With every new installment of the comic book franchise, the scale gets bigger, relationships get trickier, new forces enter the fray.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Steven Rea
    Sitting in the theater, watching Knight of Cups, you hear an incredible amount of thought-balloon babble, but you don't hear anything approaching the sublime.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Maybe the best reason to see Papa: Hemingway in Cuba is to catch a glimpse of the real Finca Vigia, the property, with its house and pool, gardens, and tree-lined drive, where Ernest Hemingway lived and wrote - and famously drank - from 1939 until 1960. Pages of For Whom the Bell Tolls were banged out here; so, too, The Old Man and the Sea.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    Green Room is just as accomplished a film, with the writer/director doing everything right: the cast, the music, the editing, the way he leads you one way and then clobbers you (and some of his ill-fated characters) when you (and they) are least expecting it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    All the elements of Eggers' story are there; the emotional and psychological resonance is not.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's pretty much impossible not to love Sing Street's young hero as he stumbles around Dublin, dumbstruck and smitten, at turns clueless and confident.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Theron proves the master of operatic hissy fits, Blunt lets the pain show beneath the glacial cool, Chastain brings her usual Juilliard-schooled commitment to the occasion, and Hemsworth is Hemsworthian, if oft-times incomprehensible, delivering his lines in a gorse-y whorl of vowels and consonants.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Blending facts, anecdotes, and no little conjecture, Elvis & Nixon finally finds the two American icons face to face, sharing M&M's and Dr Peppers.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Miles Ahead is more a provocative character sketch than a meaty portrait, but it's a film that should be applauded for its daring, and for Cheadle's shape-shifting, soul-baring work.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Steven Rea
    Criminal, with its criminally lazy title, is mostly Costner's to growl and scowl his way through.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Linklater, drawing from his own experiences as a baseball player at Sam Houston State University, looks back with affection, a knowing wink, and maybe the beginnings of an apologetic shrug at the jerk behavior, the locker-room pranks. These guys smell freedom in the air - and maybe some pot smoke, too.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The feeblest kind of costume drama, where the costumes have more impact than the drama and where the period details serve only as distraction, reminding audiences that things looked different back then and not much else.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Wonderfully evocative, funny, sad, complex, and essential passages from a man's childhood and adolescence.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    How the film plays out, and what happens to the boy and the adults in his company, may prove a revelation, or a disappointment, or something in between. But getting there is thrilling and wondrously strange.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Disarming, alarming, and more than a little impressive, Shults' movie was shot in his mother's Texas home, and the thing plays like a cross between Eugene O'Neill and a slasher pic. (It's cut like one; the soundtrack makes you feel jumpy like one.)
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Batman v Superman lacks the levity (forced or otherwise) of a typical Marvel Universe entry. But Snyder's superpowered epic does have a sense of import and grandeur about it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Resonant and surprisingly affecting.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Director Robert Schwentke and his writing team do their best to move things along. Actually, who knows if it's their best? Maybe they're suffering from Divergent fatigue along with the rest of us.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Bronze, for all its crudeness and lewdness (Melissa Raunch, anyone?) and wonky comedy, is actually a good old-fashioned tale of redemption.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Wickedly clever nightmare entertainment.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Apart from its anthropomorphic, allegorical angle, Zootopia is also a tale of female empowerment and a classic noir, too.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An impossibly enjoyable live-action cartoon that plays on our real-life anxieties about vengeful cadres of foreign radicals blowing up people - and places.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The relationship between the young American and the old Frenchman is as rich as one of Perrier's sauces: the pupil and the teacher, the son and the father, the keen protégé and the stubborn classicist.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Most parties concerned maintain their grim countenances, their characters struggling to find the sweet spot between honor and greed, between doing the right thing and doing the absolute worst.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's transformative.

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