For 1,960 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Since Otar Left
Lowest review score: 0 Isn't She Great
Score distribution:
1960 movie reviews
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's the emotional equivalent of a big shrug.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    If you strip away all the gunplay, Hitman: Agent 47 would be about 10 minutes long.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It lacks the resonances of Gilbert's book.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The screenplay of Open Range, credited to one Craig Storper, is an awesome compendium of cowboy-movie cliches. It borders on parody, and often crosses the border, rustling up a drove of oater aphorisms.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Most disappointing, Eastwood's decades-spanning portrait reveals little about the man himself.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's a vivid way to contextualize Hypatia's astronomical musings, but it's kind of out there, too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A bit of a one-joke wonder.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The fundamental problem with The Night Listener is the manner in which the boy, Pete, is depicted. Rory Culkin gets the tricky job of bringing the role to life, and he does it well, but it's still a trick. Or is it?
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Ray
    It's a shame about Ray, because Foxx is trapped in a movie that takes the music icon's unique story and turns it into cheesy, sentimental American Dream cliches.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Penn's over-the-top tirades and bullying threats are still there - it's a wild and woolly performance that isn't always as menacing as perhaps the actor intended it to be.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Christopher Walken has the best moments in the whole thing, portraying the wacked-out auteur of the Gwen-and-Eddie vehicle. Sadly, he's only in America's Sweethearts a few hilarious minutes.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Diaz gets her own voice-over monologue, as does Patric - the different points of view functioning like stanza refrains, born in shared familial anguish.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    All manner of subplots weave their way through the film, which teems with "colorful" characters and saccharine cliches. But, like the first film, it's next to impossible not to find diversion in the company of such stalwarts as Dench and Nighy and Smith. And George Thorogood is, happily, never heard from again.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Plot contrivances, including an ominous cowboy-hatted figure who stalks Bitsey and her tagalong intern (Gabriel Mann), undermine the story's serious political themes.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Fans of swooping helicopter shots, alleys filled with backlit geysers of steam, and jump-cut editing that makes MTV look like Ingmar Bergman will relish the intercontinental intrigue and huggermugger that is Spy Game.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Meta and messy, Seven Psychopaths does not hang together like "In Bruges."
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    One moment it's farcical comedy, the next it's gruesome melodrama. The movie never finds the right tone.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A testosterone-fueled road movie that displays the same Apatow-ian obsessions, and raunch, as "Pineapple Express," "Superbad," and "The 40-Year-Old Virgin."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Grey, whose clipped title, grim swagger, and lost-in-the-outback themes conjure up visions of that Alec Baldwin/Anthony Hopkins classic, "The Edge," devolves into a predictable man-against-nature, and man-against-fellow man, affair.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Krueger's comedy doesn't always spark, but its underlying intelligence - not to mention Graham's eyes - shines through.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Corny and blubbery as it is, still packs an emotional wallop.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Long and lugubrious.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Not only eight minutes shorter than its forebear, it's at least eight minutes better - less twee, less chatty, more action, more Elvish.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A raunchy comedy that's funnier to think about than to watch.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Taken for what it is - 'tweenage escapism - Stormbreaker is moderately fun.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Clunky and unsurprising.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Disconnect is an Eleanor Rigby movie. Look at all the lonely people. A "Crash" for the Internet age, Alex Henry Rubin's topical opus swoops down like an alien spaceship to investigate a disparate group of Earthlings living in close proximity in the suburbs of New York City.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Much scampering, yelling, quaking and crying is required of the actors, and they acquit themselves well enough, even with oozing fake wounds and prop rebars piercing their shoulder blades.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Loses itself in melodrama, caricature and narrative missteps.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The premise of Village of the Damned remains wonderfully scary: that an alien life force has descended on a community, inseminated its women, and spawned a gaggle of evil brainiacs with platinum-blond hair who can read your mind and do funny things with their eyes. [28 Apr 1995, p.3]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Little White Lies wants to capture something momentous and meaningful in these people's lives. But ultimately it's hard to care.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Twilight star's line-readings have become like Edward and his bloodsucking kin: They lack a pulse.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    While the production values are top-notch, and the action artfully choreographed, in the end - and quite well before the end - a sense of tedium sets in.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    By the end of the film, Leo is beginning to sound suspiciously like HAL in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Robotic, and more than a little peeved.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Olyphant has a cool, amiable vibe, kind of postmodern Jimmy Stewart, while Mitchell brings intelligence and quietude to yet another role that doesn't deserve such consideration.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Frankly, the wow factor isn't that great.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's all very deep, but in a tricked-up, art-directed sort of way.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Even at just 90 minutes, Balls of Fury - with its caricatures of the Asian underworld, with its G-man malarkey and gay jokes (Feng keeps an all-boy bevy of sex slaves) - begins to outstay its welcome.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Like "Mr. Holland's Opus," only in French, with an all-boy cast in white shirts and short pants, The Chorus is the kind of sugary, crowd-pleasing fare that only the most curmudgeonly moviegoer can frown upon.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    O
    Stripped of its poetry, some of the devices of the tragedy of the Moor come off here as woefully contrived.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    None of these elements quite come together, and while the clothes and props look authentic, the acting doesn't.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite its haunting artistry and its winning eccentricities, The Shipping News is a vehicle that's still very much at sea.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An innocuously smutty road comedy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Your body's sitting there in the theater, but it feels as if your head is someplace else.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    But moving across this tableau is Frodo and his gang, and here the trouble lies...Not a one seems believable as conveyed by Wood, who forever looks to be on the brink of a good sob. Likewise, his hobbit sidekick Samwise Gamgee (Sean Astin) is a real wuss.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Mediogre at best.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The meaning - and irony - of Kaboom's title doesn't become clear until a beat or two before the end credits roll, and even then it's hard to say what exactly Araki is getting at.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This is an A-list cast toiling on a C-list screenplay.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The movie's too long - and the violence and mayhem are unexpectedly harsh and heavy - but Franco's inspired, looped performance is right up there in the annals of reefer filmdom with Jeff Bridges' the Dude in "The Big Lebowski."
    • 87 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    What's up in The Duke of Burgundy is a straight-faced homage to 1970s European erotica, full of soft-focus nudity and soft-core kink.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As a thriller, In the Cut, with its red herring characters and plot twists, turns dopey and predictable. As a portrait of a single woman, burned by love and wary of what's in store, Campion's movie has its trenchant, telling passages.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Isn't the whole handheld "real-video" thing kind of old by now? Isn't the Shyamalanian-twist thing kind of old by now, too?
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Now in his late 40s and hairier than ever, Jeremy seems a simple enough, likable guy, and he has no pretensions about what he does. And no apologies either.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Brought to the screen with a mix of jaunty humor and jagged violence that should have worked more effectively than it does.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    One of the problems with The Dark World is that its monsters and angry armies and visual effects are interchangeable with Peter Jackson's Tolkien pics, with Clash of the Titans, with The Avengers, with Man of Steel, and on and on. These superhero movies. These Middle Earth movies. These mythic god movies. It's getting hard to tell them apart.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Starts having the same effect as one too many tequilas: the Hong Kong-style stunts, the goofy wisecracks, the foxy presence of Eva Mendes -- all of it becomes blurry and numbing.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    RED
    Too long, too busy, too loud, and too reliant on slam-bang stunt work, Red's glib dialogue and sinister government scenarios begin to wear.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    If there's a psych ward for motion pictures, It's Kind of a Funny Story should check itself in. Boden and Fleck's film suffers from bipolar disorder: manic and silly one minute, moody and muted the next.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The romanticized image of the tortured artist - never mind how warranted his or her angst might be - is the stuff of stereotype unless it's leavened with humor, or limned in art. In Fugitive Pieces, neither element appears in sufficient quantity.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Has an empty, soulless feel.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    After toiling for the likes of Ridley Scott, Ron Howard, and Peter Weir all these years, Crowe takes command of his own camera crews and castmates, mounting an ambitious and sentimental period drama.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's the magic of movies, not a movie that comes close to achieving real magic.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The thing's a behemoth. And as the franchise thunders on, it's also becoming more and more a bore.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The homoerotic subtext of the whole buddy movie oeuvre has never received quite the explicit lampooning it gets in this quirky, crash-and-burn action-comedy. [6 Sept 1996, p.8]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This In-Laws feels, in the end, formulaic and unnecessary, especially when the original is yours for the renting at the video store.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Too freewheeling for its own good, like a Robert Altman ensemble piece without a gravitational core. But Hawke's actors are a talented troupe, and even when things get self-indulgent and fuzzy-headed (and boy, do they!), interesting stuff is going on.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Quite possibly the biggest ego trip ever to play Cannes, or anywhere else, at any time.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The perfect film for anyone who likes their headbutting and kickboxing dressed up in gold brocade, frilly collars, and tri-cornered caps. And isn't that all of us?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's no adroitness, no grace in the handling of the pitching emotions - funny, sad, icky - that such a story presents.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A boldly sappy melodrama that plays on - and off - racial stereotypes.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Directed by veteran stuntman Ric Roman Waugh, Snitch is shot with a mix of nervous close-ups and weirdly vertiginous angles.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Dumb with a capital D, Blades of Glory takes its (almost) fleshed-out sketch-comedy idea as far as an ice-skating buddy movie with we're-not-gay jokes and a psycho stalker can go.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It can be argued that Adam uses Asperger's as a kind of metaphor for the barriers that people erect to fend off strangers, to guard against intimacy. It can also be argued that writer/director Mayer is shamelessly manipulative.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's a loose, vérité vibe here, and times when both Williams and Gosling root down deep to deliver something resonant and true. But this modern-day kitchen sink drama is ultimately too painful, too labored, to care much about at all.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A smart aleck-y kidnapping caper that whooshes around to a thumping electronic beat.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Heartfelt and artfully shot, the movie - with little Rodrigo Noya, wearing big eyeglasses, in the title role - is too sweet for its own good, even as some of its characters do things that aren't terribly sweet at all.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The tradecraft is there, the film craft is there, but the craftiness of a great concept is gone. Any way Bourne can go through Treadstone again?
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A loving, dopey documentary about the bird man of a place with a view of Alcatraz.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's more voyeurism going on here, and less insight into a certain culture (the young and the wasted), than the filmmakers would probably admit to, but the performances are scarily real, and the outcome, well, is just scary.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This is the slightest and slimmest of sex comedies.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Yes, it's stupid. But sometimes it's stupid with a capital S, and it's in those moments of transcendent idiocy that you can't help liking Saving Silverman. At least, a little bit.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Ultimately, it's the romance that feels forced and phony, not the group meetings, the confessions, the anguished moments alone.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Tomorrow Never Dies sticks to the Bond formula without bringing anything new, or particularly inspired, to the proceedings. (Besides a lot of shameless product placement, that is.)
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    What Eagle Eye wants to do is show us technology's dark side: all the stuff that's there to make our lives easier - ATMs, PDAs, iPods, GPS, cell phones, PCs, "smart" houses - turned against us in a vast conspiracy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Carpenter, an old hand at this horror stuff, delivers some convincingly creepy effects, but the narrative lacks any sustained dramatic pulse - its gallery of hallucinogenic scenes doesn't add up to much more than, well, a gallery of hallucinogenic scenes. [03 Feb 1995, p.5]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It is by turns illuminating, exasperating, sloppy, redundant, a head-spinner, and a headache.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There are big, jaunty gusts of music, and there are big, jaunty gusts of acting: the Heath Ledger-esque Alexander Fehling pumps up his Johann Wolfgang von Goethe with brash, boyish verve and stormy emoting.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Wild Target is the sort of farce where nothing, essentially, is at stake, even as cars crash (including an original Mini Cooper), bullets rip, and knives get hurled with deadly velocity.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    That's kind of the aesthetic that Stanton is going for: over-the-top pulp. But there's something generic about the digitally rendered Martians, and there's a corniness to the dialogue that keeps the audience from any kind of emotional attachment to the Tharks and Zodangans and their ilk.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Funny and not-funny, slapstick and slapdash, Welcome to Collinwood is a seriously uneven caper comedy in which a bunch of really fine character actors get to act really, really silly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Wanted is head-spinning stuff, and it's easy to get caught up in its masterfully manipulated mayhem. Visually, and viscerally, it's pretty awesome.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The menagerie of mythological beasties in Narnia don't seem quite genuinely, three-dimensionally real.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's the classic odd-couple buddy movie setup, only it'll pull at your heartstrings, whether you want it too or not. And you won't want it to, because it's sap.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This based-on-real-life tale of artistic aspirations and international politics is packed with more corn than an Iowa silo.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Not as consistently or uproariously funny as "American Pie," but it does have a Zen zaniness that gives it center as well as edge.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Casting herself (as the proprietor of the local cafe) along with a mix of professional and nonprofessional actors, Labaki tries to get across her give-peace-a-chance message with humor, with song, with melodrama.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Somewhat fleeter and more engaging than its predecessor.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A Single Man is like a big coffee table book on grief, loneliness, and loss - and mid-20th-century home design.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A big, kabooming sequel that plays sleight-of-hand with its audience.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Sunshine can be seen as a story about science and religion, about the rational mind and the mad. But at a certain point, like a dying star about to pop into eternal nothingness, the movie can't be seen as anything - it just implodes.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The film doesn't hold together in any compelling way.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    If Mockingjay - Part 1 was walkier and talkier than its forerunners, Part 2 is pretty much all action - and lesser for it.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This violently comic caper has some spunky charm going for it -- but has a lot of self-consciously hip, studied wackiness going against it.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Nasty stuff. It's xenophobic (message: Americans, steer clear of the Third World); it's photogenic (the Sports Illustrated-likeswimsuit issue beach scenes, the colorful villages, the lush landscapes); it's gruesome (operating table POV shots); and it's violent.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A tale of disaffection, devastation and epiphanies of the catastrophic kind.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Someone should check Joe Carnahan for performance enhancement drugs. Smokin' Aces, the wild ride of a movie he scripted and directed, is so pumped up, manic and mayhem-packed that it practically shoots sweat off the screen.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Fragmented, dreamlike, a whir of memories and misery, We Need to Talk About Kevin is unsettling, but also somehow unnecessary.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Fails to bring Giger to life in any kind of illuminating way.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An old-style mob movie based on a real court case and a real character - a colorful character - Find Me Guilty is about loyalty, family, and a bunch of good fellas.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Strip away the video-game visual effects, the endless chases and zero gravity shootouts, and Total Recall comes down to this: What is reality?
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Students of sound design and horror-movie scores should see - or hear - Closer to God, which elicits more creepy scares than its transparent plot warrants, thanks to an unsettling audio mix and pulsing, percolating music from Thomas Nöla.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A whodunit, a whydunit, and an excuse for Adrien Brody to mug it up like nobody's business.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    At times solid and suspenseful, at times dopily implausible and woefully familiar.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Forte and company have managed to make crude and lewd dunderheadedness laugh-out-loud funny here and there, and that, I guess, is something of an achievement.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Luckily, Statham is up to the task. Which is a surprise, because he's never, ever done anything like this before.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Sure, there's a witty reference to another, vastly more momentous legal drama (To Kill a Mockingbird, Robert Duvall's film debut). And yes, Farmiga gets to call out Downey, and stay in character, for "that hyper-verbal vocabulary vomit thing that you do." Small pleasures, in a bigger mess.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Saraband, flat and static both visually and thematically, doesn't begin to approximate the austere beauty of the director's art-house classics.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Shameless in every way imaginable, Me Before You milks the pathos for all it's worth, but milks the comedy, too.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lightweight, likable buppie romantic comedy.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Trade comes off like TV-movie sensationalism, sidetracked by distracting backstories and hard-to-swallow plot twists.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Black Nativity offers a whopping serving of Yuletide emotion. And it's a musical - with plenty of wailing and rapping on the side.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An enjoyably cheesy teen melodrama with a touch of indie edge.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Chan's signature mix of screwball comedy and gymnastic derring-do landed him his own cartoon series a few years back, and The Medallion -- with its bumbling spies and bounding star -- is about as cartoonish as live action gets.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It seems sadly apt that the Daddy Warbucks figure played by Jamie Foxx in the new Annie is a cellphone mogul. Because Foxx is pretty much phoning in his performance.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    For genre geeks, this can be fun - although nothing in Scream 4 is quite as clever as the filmmakers seem to think it is.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's a harrowing tale, but one that gets phonied up with unnecessary slo-mos, manipulative soundtrack cues, and unrestrained thespianism.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Night at the Museum tent pole has played fast and loose with history, and with our knowledge, or lack of knowledge, of the past. But I'm pretty sure a capuchin monkey never urinated on teensy-weensy figures of a cowboy and a Roman emperor as they ran for their lives from a lava flow in ancient Pompeii. That happens in Secret of the Tomb, and it seems like a fitting way to retire the show.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Where My Wife was offbeat and original, Happily Ever After gets bogged down in midlife-crisis cliches.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It also smells very much like a movie with money on its mind - not altogether successfully balancing its loftier ideas with a sense of superficial whimsy and Vegas-meets-Wizard of Oz production design.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Gritty and compelling up to a point, but cheaply exploitive as well.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Devoting more time to the setup than to the follow-through, Tower Heist doesn't really build suspense so much as it builds impatience - for the thing to be over.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Classy but ultimately unsatisfying film.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Visually, taking its cues (mostly) from Van Allsburg's Hopperesque art, The Polar Express is eye-popping. Storywise, however, it can be eyelid-drooping.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Rourke and Roberts! Dueling kings of B-movie excess and cable-TV schlock, together again on the big screen! Talk about chemistry!
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Boasts exceedingly high levels of improbability and an embarrassment of continuity and character shortfalls, but still has a certain bubbleheaded charm.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's low-grade Casablanca - an ill-fated love affair, rife with murder and deceit, with World War II as a backdrop and a farewell scene that has something to do with getting to Paris.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There are winning scenes between Wilson and the three teens as they train in various martial arts (like Mexican Judo - "as in Ju-don't know who you're messing with!") and get tips from clips of "Fight Club" and "The Untouchables."
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Ma Mere, with its sun-drenched sense of dread and band of reckless, unlikable characters, isn't very good, but that doesn't stop the actors -- especially the intrepid Huppert -- from going all the way.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Elevated beyond its cutesy contrivances and mawkishness by some extraordinarily good performances.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Hackman's in it a lot, and he is, as almost always, great fun.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Never mind the cool, convincing effects (and they are cool), The Day After Tomorrow teems with illogical action, improbable coincidences. It's pure escapist fare, a popcorn gobbler.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Strange and gloomy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Has a breezy, Altmanesque air, as it tracks the mini-dramas of its crisscrossing characters.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A yawning affair that would be a perfectly fine video rental but doesn't really require the big screen.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Baked and half-baked, Tenacious D does manage to give the term potty humor a new meaning. That's some kind of genius, right?
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    TMNT has a cool, noirish sheen. There's an attention to detail in the visuals and sound design that pushes it up several notches above most kiddie fare. It's not art, dude, but it will do.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The film is just middling. A clever line here and there, a debonair Dempsey wink, a cute Monaghan nod, and another Bill and Monica reference to tie things all together.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Steeped in attitude - a smart-alecky, insider sarcasm that can be pretty clever at times, but also pretty insufferable.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Beautiful Creatures tries terribly hard to establish its own mythology of magic and witchcraft and Southern-fried adolescent angst. This isn't Hogwarts, though, and it's not even Forks High from Twilight, but boy, you know Warner Bros., the studio behind Beautiful Creatures, wants it to be!
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An international caper with James Bond and Tom Clancy overtones - and Austin Powers undertones, too.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's not easy being macho while you're shivering like a frozen puppy, but Kutcher pulls it off.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    13 Hours, by its very subject matter, can't help but tap into the confluent veins of politics and patriotism.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The dialogue rings tinny in the ear, as if enunciated in the phony arc of a stage light.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Terminator 3 moves at not-quite-breakneck speed, and the shape-shifting, metal-melting special effects aren't exactly spectacular.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Offers a gripping mix of sexual heat and nasty menace. It's "Dead Calm" meets "Very Bad Things," with English accents.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A squirmingly strange and brutal study of sexual power, masochism and mother-daughter madness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The chaos and carnage here is just a pumped-up take on a tradition that harks back to Godzilla, and harks back, of course, to the Marvel comics from which all these heros originally sprang.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Beautiful to behold but lacking in any kind of palpable dread or suspense.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Instead of gleaning something from real life, the great minds behind Friends With Benefits slapped their ideas together based on screwball classics, "Sleepless in Seattle" bits, and a keen analysis of Hollywood hackery.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With so many good Austen adaptations out there (the Keira Knightley Pride & Prejudice, the Colin Firth Pride and Prejudice, Emma Thompson and Ang Lee's splendid Sense and Sensibility), Becoming Jane seems a bit flimsy by comparison.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Tonally askew (Altman-esque one minute, Austin Powers-esque the next), Inherent Vice is a sun-glared, neon-limned muddle of noir plotline and potheaded jokery that not only doesn't make sense, but actually seems to try hard not to.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An atmospheric Argentine thriller starring Viggo Mortensen in twin roles (literally), Everybody Has a Plan is in the vein of, if not on the same plane as, Michelangelo Antonioni's "The Passenger."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Comedy, pathos, and some schmaltzy couplets about the changing seasons follow forthwith.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A downer of a drama.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's "The Deep" reimagined as an Abercrombie catalog.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A mix of coolheaded cultural satire and anxiety-inducing workplace and marital shenanigans, Extract is an odd project. It's smarter than most of the comedies out there right now, but that doesn't necessarily make it funnier.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Gyllenhaal, in the pivotal role, brings a scruffy, boyish charm to the proceedings, but his big scenes with Hoffman and Sarandon are one-sided - he's not in the same league, and comes off as a bit of a cipher.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite Scorsese's efforts to pump up some drama - the director, with his signature glasses and Groucho brows, gets huffy about not receiving a set list - drama is sorely lacking. This is just a concert film.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An enjoyably goofy hybrid of extraterrestrial sci-fi and Iron Age action, Outlander boasts a super-serious Jim Caviezel in the title role
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    At a certain point in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, you expect Caesar to say, "Et tu, Koba?" Maybe a bit obvious, but it would have shown some wit.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As for Duff, she's bright-eyed and bubbly, though her singing talents are nowhere near as awesome as Raise Your Voice's who's-going-to-win-the-big-scholarship plotline requires.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    What's maddening about Angel-A is that Besson is so brilliant with his visuals - and so in love with his two leads and the city they're parading around - that you desperately want the story, and the characters, to make some kind of emotional sense. This, however, does not happen.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's lots of zero-g action in Ender's Game - even old Han Solo takes a whirl.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    How do you say "tearjerker" in Spanish?
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Empire, with its double-barreled shoot-outs, its predictable carnage and conflict, and a rush-job of a resolution, is ultimately just one more urban gangland genre flick.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Taylor Hackford directs crisply, unpretentiously. Patti LuPone goes Latina, playing Lopez's soap opera-addicted mom, and Bobby Cannavale is a Palm Beach cop with an eye for Leslie. The action is fast and furious.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Breaking and Entering is smart and smartly done, as it describes these inter-circling worlds - the well-to-do Brits and the newly deposited foreigners, trying to shake off their homeland tragedies and start anew.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The special effects are effective, though not terribly special. While director Minkoff pays homage to past masters of the genre, the past masters were better at this game than he.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Very slight and, in the early going, slightly annoying, Coffee and Cigarettes is a long-borning Jarmusch project.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Too cute for its own good, Larry Crowne is nonetheless hard to dislike.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The tiny, intrepid rodent is so cute it's impossible not to ooh and aww, just looking at him. Which is a good thing, because you'll need something to get you through the long stretches of fairytale pastiche that make up this overwrought yarn.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Don't come to The Amazing-Spider-Man looking for originality.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A modest and obviously heartfelt endeavor.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    All the elements of Eggers' story are there; the emotional and psychological resonance is not.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Some of the most tasteless and un-PC comedy in the film is also the funniest - Farrelly Brothers-style humor that plays off the Bateman character's physical limitations.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Arnold's Wuthering Heights has its doom-laden moments of urgency and heartache, but vast swaths of the (longish) film just seem to meander across the muddy hills.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Sweet-natured but overdone, over-long film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The paper's motto is "All the News That's Fit to Print." But all that news doesn't necessarily fit neatly into a 90-minute doc.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With visual nods to Stanley Kubrick's "The Shining" and a fairly faithful adherence to the tenor and tone of the Korean scare genre, The Uninvited doesn't startle and shock so much as it lulls you into a series of unsettling, hallucinogenic set pieces.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With his sleepy, So-Cal inflections, Costner is an actor who summons urgency and drama with, well, I'm not sure exactly how he does what he does. He's the least dynamic of stars, but still, he is one.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite a strong cast and a willingness to lampoon the fundamentals of fundamentalism, Saved! isn't as funny, or as wicked, as it should be.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    While it flirts with "After School Special"-ness, at least has the courage to address racial and cultural cliches with a degree of honesty.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An interesting choice for a Valentine's Day outing, He Loves Me is a weird, bubbly cocktail -- effervescent charm and troubling pathology, shaken together.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Parental units who manage to remain conscious through the kiddie-centric proceedings can either savor, or groan at, Malkovich's bespectacled Octavius barking punny, celebrity name-dropping orders to his minions.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A handsome-looking movie that's full of the muted greens, browns and grays of the tony Hamptons, director Williams' tale never quite finds its footing.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Beyond turbocharged. It whooshes along at warp speed. And still, despite some awesomely choreographed stunts and the two stars' pedal-to-the-metal appeal, the movie seems endless.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Don't run off before the credits start to roll, though: The Incredible Hulk ends with a jokey cameo by a certain movie star with his own newfound superhero franchise.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As a character study, City by the Sea is engaging. As a police thriller, it's not all there.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's fun to watch Keaton and Kline together, bickering and (of course) bonding all over again.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With the exception of a few stakes and crosses jumping from the screen, some bloody sprays here and there, and one creepy, claustrophobic car ride, the 3-D glasses are a hindrance, not an enhancement.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Easily the trippiest and goofiest of the five addled adolescent vampire romances based on the Stephenie Meyer books.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Everything about An Unfinished Life's screenplay is cliched and predictable, but the actors manage to elevate the proceedings above and beyond shameless soap.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An elaborate origins story with more datelines than an issue of Condé Nast Traveler (Oxford! Miami! Argentina! Poland!), X-Men: First Class has some fun trying to explain how Professor X, Magneto, and all those mopey mutants came to be.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Goes somewhere the first "Hellboy" never ventured: into the Realms of Tedium.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As a meditation on the vicissitudes of love, on the need for people to connect, and the struggles that come by both making and missing those connections, the movie is wading-pool deep.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A bizarre counterculture jukebox musical.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Has its effectively nasty, chilling moments -- and it also brings body piercing to new heights of ickiness.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Flipping his cigarette lighter and snapping deadpan retorts, Reeves plays the demon-hunting detective with Keanu-esque panache.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It would be curmudgeonly to count all the ways in which The Hundred-Foot Journey is unsurprising, unrealistic, unnecessary.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Stylishly spooky and featuring a hammy, cigarette-sucking performance from Gena Rowlands.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Unfortunately, Mission: Impossible - which assembles a new Impossible Missions Force and plops it down in Kiev, Prague, London and Langley, Va. - doesn't have the momentum or suspense of De Palma's best pictures. It moves, awkwardly at times, from one elaborate set-piece to the next. [22 May 1996, p.E01]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Although the sequel retains its predecessor's breezy retro spirit, The Mummy Returns is a mite darker and scarier and the effects a little spiffier.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It is Rapace, the Swedish actress who gained worldwide recognition as Lisbeth Salander in the original adaptation of "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo," who ends up the true heroine of Prometheus.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A campy homage to those days of malt shops, drive-ins, and saucer-shaped UFOs - you know, the ones that go crashing into nearby buttes, unleashing terrible terrors from another galaxy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's earnest, but it feels beside the point. Blood Diamond's real point: box office.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's a hokey piece of melodrama in a movie that cheats its characters - and its audience - out of some emotional truth.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The film only occasionally comes to life - it's too literal (and literary), too studied, too still.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Like Mickey Rourke in "The Wrestler," Malkovich plays a star long past his glory days in The Great Buck Howard, but continuing to do the only thing he knows. The tone of the two films couldn't be less alike, but the story arc of the central characters graphs the same.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The filmmakers' narrative device of framing Quinn's tale as a feature-length flashback doesn't pay off - we get a goody-two-shoes moral lesson at the end, and a look at movie studio aging makeup gone wild.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Been there, done that. As thrilling a filmmaker as Martin Scorsese continues to be, and as wild a performance as Leonardo DiCaprio dishes up as its morally bankrupt master of the universe, The Wolf of Wall Street seems almost entirely unnecessary.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A wholesome little drama aimed at the pre- and early-teen crowd.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As solid as Cranston, Leguizamo, Kruger, Bratt, and all the rest are, the built-in constraints of the movie format don't do their real-life counterparts full justice.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Stymied by a clunking script, crammed with expository exchanges and urgent blather.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Gretchen Mol stars as a 35-year-old virgin deflowered in lusty romance-novel fashion on a trip to Mexico. Her hunky lover-boy's name? Jesus Christ (played by Justin Theroux). The segment? "Thou shalt not take the Lord's name in vain."
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Clones makes the Frodo-speak of "Lord of the Rings" sound like Noel Coward.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Moderately compelling and clinical. This isn't "Breakfast at Tiffany's"; this isn't even "Klute."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    22 Jump Street's scattershot approach to comedy is rooted in the belief that for every anatomical, scatalogical, sexual, or pop-cultural reference and pun gone awry, another will stick to the wall like, um, bodily fluid.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Barnz tries, at least a bit, to acknowledge the heroic and historic legacy of the union movement and its rightful place in the contemporary labor landscape. But much of the blame for the sorry state of Adams Elementary, and the school system at large, is placed at the union's feet.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Girl With a Pearl Earring is really about watching paint dry. S l o w l y.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Ultimately, the movie's a bust.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This ninth installment in the Marvel mutant superhero franchise is rife with urgent and (dare we say?) apocalyptic comings and goings, with characters and confrontations that seem at once familiar and befuddling.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This mildly amusing tale of infidelity, blackmail, class differences and corporate greed not only strains credulity - it strains for laughs.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    One of the problems with the way Mamet resolves Mike's predicament is that it's ridiculously implausible - even in the context of a far-fetched fight story.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Admission works in stops and starts.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Finding Amanda isn't bad, and there is some smart, jagged humor.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The humor and chops are there, but the story isn't quite.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's a difference between velocity and momentum, and while the chases, shootouts and close-quarters combat rarely flag, our interest does.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In some ways, American Reunion is the Charlize Theron indie "Young Adult" all over again: In both, a small-town high school reunion is the setting for a lot of nostalgia and narcissism and nasty behavior.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With border crossings and familiar buddy-cop movie tropes (think Lethal Weapon, think 48 HRS, think The Heat), the Wahlberg-Washington express hits lots of comfortably familiar notes. And more than a few viciously uncomfortable ones, too.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Spanish actress Marina Gatell is exotic and engaging as a young writer drawn to Lorca and puzzled why he is not drawn to her in return.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An enjoyable throwback to the way monster movies used to be made.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Illuminated by dim candles and the rare glimmer of sun, the movie is grainy, closed-in, and likely to cause spasms of claustrophobia.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Jobs is a just-the-facts - and fiddling-with-the-facts - dramatization, forgoing any kind of deeper psychological exploration of the man and his motivations, his demons and dreams.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The movie would pour nicely onto a thick stack of pancakes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Hip Hop Project, a documentary about Kazi and the young men and women he mentors, isn't quite as successful as Kazi himself - a Bahamian orphan and teenage street hustler who turned his life around, and got folks like Queen Latifah, Russell Simmons and Bruce Willis to help out him and his project.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Fails on a couple of levels. It never really gives you a sense of the psychology, the root causes behind Glass' elaborate frauds... And since we don't know the why, the how becomes considerably less interesting.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    At best diverting, at worst an almost self-parodic compendium of French film cliches.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    I Am Legend is essentially "28 Days Later" . . ., or "28 Weeks Later" . . ., only with millions more for special effects, and with nothing approaching the heart-pounding, bloodcurdling power and smarts of the two British-made yarns.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Any semblance of seriousness and verisimilitude suggested by the marketing campaign is quickly forgotten once director Antoine Fuqua's enjoyably tacky Die Hard-on-the-Potomac gets under way.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's a cinematic feat, an art lover's dream, but as a moviegoing experience, Alexander Sokurov's Russian Ark is something of a letdown.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Femme Fatale is glossy, glamorous cinema as collage. Maybe all the pieces of a truly good film noir are here, but the filmmaker has opted simply to toss them into the air and let them fall where they may.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Max
    This film is a philosophical musing -- a humanitarian speculation, not a drama about real people, historical figures or not, who seem fully formed.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There are chases that feel way too long, and dialogue that feels flat. Affleck and Thurman make a handsome duo, but there's no spark between the actors.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A kind of Tracy/Hepburn rom-com with a "Dead Poets Society" backdrop and dollops of human failing for added drama, Words and Pictures stars Clive Owen and Juliette Binoche - a matchup that makes you want to like Fred Schepisi's film, even when it becomes impossible to do so.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Ready-made for Valentine's Day, The Vow is, like the offerings at Cafe Mnemonic, a total sugar overload.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Cross Dog Day Afternoon with This is Spinal Tap and you have the concept behind Airheads: heavy metal trio seeking record contract holds radio station employees hostage, much mayhem and moshing ensues.... Airheads isn't nearly as good as its antecedents, but it does manage to produce a stream of lowbrow laughs. Or smiles, anyway. [5 Aug 1994, p.3]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Echoing the lessons learned from "HAL in 2001: A Space Odyssey," the message of Transcendence is that computers should not be allowed to become sentient.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As Hopkins himself goes wild-eyed and FX-ed with popping veins, The Rite gives up on asking us to take it seriously.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Like Liam Neeson's "Taken" series, Costner's 3 Days to Kill finds its absentee-dad action hero facing off against hordes of goons and gorillas - not to rescue his loved ones, but to prove himself to them, and maybe get a little extra quality time, too.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A pumped-up, plotless montage of extraordinary landscapes, colorful wildlife, and interesting people performing feats of derring-do.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In a way, The TV Set suffers from the same syndrome as the industry it's parodying: bland and compromised, it feels as if it's been fine-tuned and focus-grouped within an inch of its life.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As stories go, The Astronaut Farmer is engaging, even if it serves up a kind of Plains State brand of Rocky-esque hooey.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    For all the film's gritty verisimilitude, The Messenger is not the great Iraq War movie that Kathryn Bigelow's "The Hurt Locker" is.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Tries too hard to be playful and sensual, wacky and romantic, and comes away feeling fake and prefabricated instead.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's hard to feel compassion for these Masters of the Universe. I'm not even sure Chandor wants us to, but if he doesn't, then what's the point?
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Whether he's smacking into an iceberg or flopping topless onto a sandy beach, DiCaprio is still maddeningly lightweight.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Is Django Unchained about race and power and the ugly side of history? Only as much as "Inglourious Basterds" was about race and power and the ugly side of history. It's a live-action, heads-exploding, shoot-'em-up cartoon. Sometimes it crackles, and sometimes it merely cracks.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Where "Run Lola Run" was like a perpetual-motion machine, The International seems to forever be stopping in its own tracks. Tykwer takes coffee breaks to explain the convoluted and dicey plot.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    What it lacks, though, is any sense that these people - are real.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Grisly stuff. The movie, shot in Australia with an Aussie and British cast, makes "127 Hours" look like a walk in the park.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Skarsgard's performance is bold and raw (and reminiscent of vintage Jack Lemmon in its earnestness).
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Plays around with some interesting notions, such as the nature of reality, the nature of humanity, and the nature of spiffy apartments with sleek bathroom fixtures.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There is plenty in Star Trek Beyond for diehard Trekkers to enjoy, and director Justin Lin (Fast & Furious) guns the action sequences.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Never as much fun as (Woo's) old Chow Yun Fat-starring Chinese pics.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Bedtime Stories does have a comic buoyancy, even as its plot trots on a predictable course. Perhaps the different accents and sensibilities have something to do with that.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Terribly slight and a little off.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    McCarthy's screenplay, a tangle of doublecrosses and dead men, has just been published. Those who really want to know what's going on would be advised to buy a copy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's not that Fay Grim isn't amusing. It is, in that deadpan, skewed way that indie auteur Hartley's pics always are. But there's not much else going on here.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Impossibly arty and, at times, narratively incoherent, Filth and Wisdom still has its goofy charms.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It is possible to bring substance, as well as poetry, to the vignette form, but more often Paris, Je T'Aime is merely mundane.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    While Choke, adapted for the screen and directed by Clark Gregg, is by no means a disaster, it is disappointing - and oddly dull.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Teeming with socially awkward misfits, Gentlemen Broncos is not without its absurdist charms, although Hess (who co-scripted with his wife, Jerusha) pushes the envelope in ways it doesn't need pushing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lacks an essential sense of purpose.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It says in the beginning of the film that Two for the Money is "inspired by a true story." Problem is, it's just not that inspired.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As scripted by Cathy Rabin and directed by Santosh Sivan, Before the Rains is never less than compelling, but never more than adequately realized.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Visually dazzling but ultimately dizzying ride, a trippy suspenser that gets tripped up on its own deja vu voodoo.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A black comedy, a character study, and a thriller, Lord of War lacks the gritty, hell-bent hilarity of David O. Russell's contemporary war pic, "Three Kings."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Emily Watson, looking at home in her '40s frocks, plays Angus' mother - coping not only with her son's obsession with what she believes to be an imaginary friend, but also with her own worry and grief about her husband at war.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Washington offers another of his rock-steady performances, playing a career civil servant with a couple of secrets of his own, but confident, diligent, ready to go the distance for the city he loves.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The problem with Captain America: The Winter Soldier is that there's too much going on: the Marvel Universe stuff, the WikiLeaks-ish paranoia stuff, the video game-ish CG visual effects stuff, the epic John Woo-ish everybody-pointing-a-weapon-at-everybody-else face-off stuff.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Yes, there's a hastily added new ending - an ending that doesn't make sense when you think about it. Not that it's worth the effort
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Williamson's screenplay doesn't match the cleverness of his conceit; it lacks the requisite archness and wit.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Easy to like, and easy to forget.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Doesn't run very deep, or resonate with profound meaning. But as a thoughtful fable, laced with humor, the picture has its charms.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Doesn't have the dramatic heft to warrant all its angst and anguish.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A harmless and mildly amusing family comedy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Duplicity zips from one elaborate piece of hugger-mugger to the next. But at a certain point (for me, it was Rome), boredom sets in.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A stage-y but likable ensemble piece.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Perhaps to compensate for the absence of compelling drama and tension (and a few continuity gaffes), Scott has retreated to his TV commercial roots and crammed Hannibal full of busy, art-directed visuals.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A jukebox musical that's astonishingly cornball one minute, winkingly sardonic the next.

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