For 1,789 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 72% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 The Son's Room
Lowest review score: 0 A Little Bit of Heaven
Score distribution:
1,789 movie reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A yawning affair that would be a perfectly fine video rental but doesn't really require the big screen.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Baked and half-baked, Tenacious D does manage to give the term potty humor a new meaning. That's some kind of genius, right?
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    TMNT has a cool, noirish sheen. There's an attention to detail in the visuals and sound design that pushes it up several notches above most kiddie fare. It's not art, dude, but it will do.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The film is just middling. A clever line here and there, a debonair Dempsey wink, a cute Monaghan nod, and another Bill and Monica reference to tie things all together.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Steeped in attitude - a smart-alecky, insider sarcasm that can be pretty clever at times, but also pretty insufferable.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Beautiful Creatures tries terribly hard to establish its own mythology of magic and witchcraft and Southern-fried adolescent angst. This isn't Hogwarts, though, and it's not even Forks High from Twilight, but boy, you know Warner Bros., the studio behind Beautiful Creatures, wants it to be!
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An international caper with James Bond and Tom Clancy overtones - and Austin Powers undertones, too.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's not easy being macho while you're shivering like a frozen puppy, but Kutcher pulls it off.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The dialogue rings tinny in the ear, as if enunciated in the phony arc of a stage light.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Terminator 3 moves at not-quite-breakneck speed, and the shape-shifting, metal-melting special effects aren't exactly spectacular.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Offers a gripping mix of sexual heat and nasty menace. It's "Dead Calm" meets "Very Bad Things," with English accents.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A squirmingly strange and brutal study of sexual power, masochism and mother-daughter madness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The chaos and carnage here is just a pumped-up take on a tradition that harks back to Godzilla, and harks back, of course, to the Marvel comics from which all these heros originally sprang.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Beautiful to behold but lacking in any kind of palpable dread or suspense.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Instead of gleaning something from real life, the great minds behind Friends With Benefits slapped their ideas together based on screwball classics, "Sleepless in Seattle" bits, and a keen analysis of Hollywood hackery.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With so many good Austen adaptations out there (the Keira Knightley Pride & Prejudice, the Colin Firth Pride and Prejudice, Emma Thompson and Ang Lee's splendid Sense and Sensibility), Becoming Jane seems a bit flimsy by comparison.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Tonally askew (Altman-esque one minute, Austin Powers-esque the next), Inherent Vice is a sun-glared, neon-limned muddle of noir plotline and potheaded jokery that not only doesn't make sense, but actually seems to try hard not to.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An atmospheric Argentine thriller starring Viggo Mortensen in twin roles (literally), Everybody Has a Plan is in the vein of, if not on the same plane as, Michelangelo Antonioni's "The Passenger."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Comedy, pathos, and some schmaltzy couplets about the changing seasons follow forthwith.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A downer of a drama.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's "The Deep" reimagined as an Abercrombie catalog.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A mix of coolheaded cultural satire and anxiety-inducing workplace and marital shenanigans, Extract is an odd project. It's smarter than most of the comedies out there right now, but that doesn't necessarily make it funnier.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Gyllenhaal, in the pivotal role, brings a scruffy, boyish charm to the proceedings, but his big scenes with Hoffman and Sarandon are one-sided - he's not in the same league, and comes off as a bit of a cipher.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite Scorsese's efforts to pump up some drama - the director, with his signature glasses and Groucho brows, gets huffy about not receiving a set list - drama is sorely lacking. This is just a concert film.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An enjoyably goofy hybrid of extraterrestrial sci-fi and Iron Age action, Outlander boasts a super-serious Jim Caviezel in the title role
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    At a certain point in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, you expect Caesar to say, "Et tu, Koba?" Maybe a bit obvious, but it would have shown some wit.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As for Duff, she's bright-eyed and bubbly, though her singing talents are nowhere near as awesome as Raise Your Voice's who's-going-to-win-the-big-scholarship plotline requires.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    What's maddening about Angel-A is that Besson is so brilliant with his visuals - and so in love with his two leads and the city they're parading around - that you desperately want the story, and the characters, to make some kind of emotional sense. This, however, does not happen.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's lots of zero-g action in Ender's Game - even old Han Solo takes a whirl.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    How do you say "tearjerker" in Spanish?
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Empire, with its double-barreled shoot-outs, its predictable carnage and conflict, and a rush-job of a resolution, is ultimately just one more urban gangland genre flick.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Taylor Hackford directs crisply, unpretentiously. Patti LuPone goes Latina, playing Lopez's soap opera-addicted mom, and Bobby Cannavale is a Palm Beach cop with an eye for Leslie. The action is fast and furious.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Breaking and Entering is smart and smartly done, as it describes these inter-circling worlds - the well-to-do Brits and the newly deposited foreigners, trying to shake off their homeland tragedies and start anew.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The special effects are effective, though not terribly special. While director Minkoff pays homage to past masters of the genre, the past masters were better at this game than he.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Very slight and, in the early going, slightly annoying, Coffee and Cigarettes is a long-borning Jarmusch project.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Too cute for its own good, Larry Crowne is nonetheless hard to dislike.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The tiny, intrepid rodent is so cute it's impossible not to ooh and aww, just looking at him. Which is a good thing, because you'll need something to get you through the long stretches of fairytale pastiche that make up this overwrought yarn.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Don't come to The Amazing-Spider-Man looking for originality.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A modest and obviously heartfelt endeavor.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Some of the most tasteless and un-PC comedy in the film is also the funniest - Farrelly Brothers-style humor that plays off the Bateman character's physical limitations.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Arnold's Wuthering Heights has its doom-laden moments of urgency and heartache, but vast swaths of the (longish) film just seem to meander across the muddy hills.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Sweet-natured but overdone, over-long film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The paper's motto is "All the News That's Fit to Print." But all that news doesn't necessarily fit neatly into a 90-minute doc.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With visual nods to Stanley Kubrick's "The Shining" and a fairly faithful adherence to the tenor and tone of the Korean scare genre, The Uninvited doesn't startle and shock so much as it lulls you into a series of unsettling, hallucinogenic set pieces.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With his sleepy, So-Cal inflections, Costner is an actor who summons urgency and drama with, well, I'm not sure exactly how he does what he does. He's the least dynamic of stars, but still, he is one.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite a strong cast and a willingness to lampoon the fundamentals of fundamentalism, Saved! isn't as funny, or as wicked, as it should be.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    While it flirts with "After School Special"-ness, at least has the courage to address racial and cultural cliches with a degree of honesty.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An interesting choice for a Valentine's Day outing, He Loves Me is a weird, bubbly cocktail -- effervescent charm and troubling pathology, shaken together.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Parental units who manage to remain conscious through the kiddie-centric proceedings can either savor, or groan at, Malkovich's bespectacled Octavius barking punny, celebrity name-dropping orders to his minions.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A handsome-looking movie that's full of the muted greens, browns and grays of the tony Hamptons, director Williams' tale never quite finds its footing.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Beyond turbocharged. It whooshes along at warp speed. And still, despite some awesomely choreographed stunts and the two stars' pedal-to-the-metal appeal, the movie seems endless.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Don't run off before the credits start to roll, though: The Incredible Hulk ends with a jokey cameo by a certain movie star with his own newfound superhero franchise.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As a character study, City by the Sea is engaging. As a police thriller, it's not all there.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's fun to watch Keaton and Kline together, bickering and (of course) bonding all over again.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With the exception of a few stakes and crosses jumping from the screen, some bloody sprays here and there, and one creepy, claustrophobic car ride, the 3-D glasses are a hindrance, not an enhancement.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Easily the trippiest and goofiest of the five addled adolescent vampire romances based on the Stephenie Meyer books.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Everything about An Unfinished Life's screenplay is cliched and predictable, but the actors manage to elevate the proceedings above and beyond shameless soap.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An elaborate origins story with more datelines than an issue of Condé Nast Traveler (Oxford! Miami! Argentina! Poland!), X-Men: First Class has some fun trying to explain how Professor X, Magneto, and all those mopey mutants came to be.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Goes somewhere the first "Hellboy" never ventured: into the Realms of Tedium.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As a meditation on the vicissitudes of love, on the need for people to connect, and the struggles that come by both making and missing those connections, the movie is wading-pool deep.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A bizarre counterculture jukebox musical.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Has its effectively nasty, chilling moments -- and it also brings body piercing to new heights of ickiness.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Flipping his cigarette lighter and snapping deadpan retorts, Reeves plays the demon-hunting detective with Keanu-esque panache.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It would be curmudgeonly to count all the ways in which The Hundred-Foot Journey is unsurprising, unrealistic, unnecessary.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Stylishly spooky and featuring a hammy, cigarette-sucking performance from Gena Rowlands.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Although the sequel retains its predecessor's breezy retro spirit, The Mummy Returns is a mite darker and scarier and the effects a little spiffier.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It is Rapace, the Swedish actress who gained worldwide recognition as Lisbeth Salander in the original adaptation of "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo," who ends up the true heroine of Prometheus.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A campy homage to those days of malt shops, drive-ins, and saucer-shaped UFOs - you know, the ones that go crashing into nearby buttes, unleashing terrible terrors from another galaxy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's earnest, but it feels beside the point. Blood Diamond's real point: box office.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's a hokey piece of melodrama in a movie that cheats its characters - and its audience - out of some emotional truth.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The film only occasionally comes to life - it's too literal (and literary), too studied, too still.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Like Mickey Rourke in "The Wrestler," Malkovich plays a star long past his glory days in The Great Buck Howard, but continuing to do the only thing he knows. The tone of the two films couldn't be less alike, but the story arc of the central characters graphs the same.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The filmmakers' narrative device of framing Quinn's tale as a feature-length flashback doesn't pay off - we get a goody-two-shoes moral lesson at the end, and a look at movie studio aging makeup gone wild.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Been there, done that. As thrilling a filmmaker as Martin Scorsese continues to be, and as wild a performance as Leonardo DiCaprio dishes up as its morally bankrupt master of the universe, The Wolf of Wall Street seems almost entirely unnecessary.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A wholesome little drama aimed at the pre- and early-teen crowd.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Stymied by a clunking script, crammed with expository exchanges and urgent blather.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Gretchen Mol stars as a 35-year-old virgin deflowered in lusty romance-novel fashion on a trip to Mexico. Her hunky lover-boy's name? Jesus Christ (played by Justin Theroux). The segment? "Thou shalt not take the Lord's name in vain."
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Clones makes the Frodo-speak of "Lord of the Rings" sound like Noel Coward.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Moderately compelling and clinical. This isn't "Breakfast at Tiffany's"; this isn't even "Klute."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    22 Jump Street's scattershot approach to comedy is rooted in the belief that for every anatomical, scatalogical, sexual, or pop-cultural reference and pun gone awry, another will stick to the wall like, um, bodily fluid.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Barnz tries, at least a bit, to acknowledge the heroic and historic legacy of the union movement and its rightful place in the contemporary labor landscape. But much of the blame for the sorry state of Adams Elementary, and the school system at large, is placed at the union's feet.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Girl With a Pearl Earring is really about watching paint dry. S l o w l y.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Ultimately, the movie's a bust.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This mildly amusing tale of infidelity, blackmail, class differences and corporate greed not only strains credulity - it strains for laughs.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    One of the problems with the way Mamet resolves Mike's predicament is that it's ridiculously implausible - even in the context of a far-fetched fight story.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Admission works in stops and starts.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Finding Amanda isn't bad, and there is some smart, jagged humor.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The humor and chops are there, but the story isn't quite.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In some ways, American Reunion is the Charlize Theron indie "Young Adult" all over again: In both, a small-town high school reunion is the setting for a lot of nostalgia and narcissism and nasty behavior.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With border crossings and familiar buddy-cop movie tropes (think Lethal Weapon, think 48 HRS, think The Heat), the Wahlberg-Washington express hits lots of comfortably familiar notes. And more than a few viciously uncomfortable ones, too.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Spanish actress Marina Gatell is exotic and engaging as a young writer drawn to Lorca and puzzled why he is not drawn to her in return.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An enjoyable throwback to the way monster movies used to be made.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Illuminated by dim candles and the rare glimmer of sun, the movie is grainy, closed-in, and likely to cause spasms of claustrophobia.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Jobs is a just-the-facts - and fiddling-with-the-facts - dramatization, forgoing any kind of deeper psychological exploration of the man and his motivations, his demons and dreams.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The movie would pour nicely onto a thick stack of pancakes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Hip Hop Project, a documentary about Kazi and the young men and women he mentors, isn't quite as successful as Kazi himself - a Bahamian orphan and teenage street hustler who turned his life around, and got folks like Queen Latifah, Russell Simmons and Bruce Willis to help out him and his project.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Fails on a couple of levels. It never really gives you a sense of the psychology, the root causes behind Glass' elaborate frauds... And since we don't know the why, the how becomes considerably less interesting.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    At best diverting, at worst an almost self-parodic compendium of French film cliches.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    I Am Legend is essentially "28 Days Later" . . ., or "28 Weeks Later" . . ., only with millions more for special effects, and with nothing approaching the heart-pounding, bloodcurdling power and smarts of the two British-made yarns.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Any semblance of seriousness and verisimilitude suggested by the marketing campaign is quickly forgotten once director Antoine Fuqua's enjoyably tacky Die Hard-on-the-Potomac gets under way.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's a cinematic feat, an art lover's dream, but as a moviegoing experience, Alexander Sokurov's Russian Ark is something of a letdown.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Femme Fatale is glossy, glamorous cinema as collage. Maybe all the pieces of a truly good film noir are here, but the filmmaker has opted simply to toss them into the air and let them fall where they may.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Max
    This film is a philosophical musing -- a humanitarian speculation, not a drama about real people, historical figures or not, who seem fully formed.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There are chases that feel way too long, and dialogue that feels flat. Affleck and Thurman make a handsome duo, but there's no spark between the actors.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A kind of Tracy/Hepburn rom-com with a "Dead Poets Society" backdrop and dollops of human failing for added drama, Words and Pictures stars Clive Owen and Juliette Binoche - a matchup that makes you want to like Fred Schepisi's film, even when it becomes impossible to do so.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Ready-made for Valentine's Day, The Vow is, like the offerings at Cafe Mnemonic, a total sugar overload.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Echoing the lessons learned from "HAL in 2001: A Space Odyssey," the message of Transcendence is that computers should not be allowed to become sentient.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As Hopkins himself goes wild-eyed and FX-ed with popping veins, The Rite gives up on asking us to take it seriously.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Like Liam Neeson's "Taken" series, Costner's 3 Days to Kill finds its absentee-dad action hero facing off against hordes of goons and gorillas - not to rescue his loved ones, but to prove himself to them, and maybe get a little extra quality time, too.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A pumped-up, plotless montage of extraordinary landscapes, colorful wildlife, and interesting people performing feats of derring-do.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In a way, The TV Set suffers from the same syndrome as the industry it's parodying: bland and compromised, it feels as if it's been fine-tuned and focus-grouped within an inch of its life.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As stories go, The Astronaut Farmer is engaging, even if it serves up a kind of Plains State brand of Rocky-esque hooey.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    For all the film's gritty verisimilitude, The Messenger is not the great Iraq War movie that Kathryn Bigelow's "The Hurt Locker" is.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Tries too hard to be playful and sensual, wacky and romantic, and comes away feeling fake and prefabricated instead.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's hard to feel compassion for these Masters of the Universe. I'm not even sure Chandor wants us to, but if he doesn't, then what's the point?
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Whether he's smacking into an iceberg or flopping topless onto a sandy beach, DiCaprio is still maddeningly lightweight.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Is Django Unchained about race and power and the ugly side of history? Only as much as "Inglourious Basterds" was about race and power and the ugly side of history. It's a live-action, heads-exploding, shoot-'em-up cartoon. Sometimes it crackles, and sometimes it merely cracks.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Where "Run Lola Run" was like a perpetual-motion machine, The International seems to forever be stopping in its own tracks. Tykwer takes coffee breaks to explain the convoluted and dicey plot.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    What it lacks, though, is any sense that these people - are real.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Grisly stuff. The movie, shot in Australia with an Aussie and British cast, makes "127 Hours" look like a walk in the park.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Skarsgard's performance is bold and raw (and reminiscent of vintage Jack Lemmon in its earnestness).
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Plays around with some interesting notions, such as the nature of reality, the nature of humanity, and the nature of spiffy apartments with sleek bathroom fixtures.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Never as much fun as (Woo's) old Chow Yun Fat-starring Chinese pics.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Bedtime Stories does have a comic buoyancy, even as its plot trots on a predictable course. Perhaps the different accents and sensibilities have something to do with that.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Terribly slight and a little off.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    McCarthy's screenplay, a tangle of doublecrosses and dead men, has just been published. Those who really want to know what's going on would be advised to buy a copy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's not that Fay Grim isn't amusing. It is, in that deadpan, skewed way that indie auteur Hartley's pics always are. But there's not much else going on here.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Impossibly arty and, at times, narratively incoherent, Filth and Wisdom still has its goofy charms.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It is possible to bring substance, as well as poetry, to the vignette form, but more often Paris, Je T'Aime is merely mundane.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    While Choke, adapted for the screen and directed by Clark Gregg, is by no means a disaster, it is disappointing - and oddly dull.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Teeming with socially awkward misfits, Gentlemen Broncos is not without its absurdist charms, although Hess (who co-scripted with his wife, Jerusha) pushes the envelope in ways it doesn't need pushing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lacks an essential sense of purpose.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It says in the beginning of the film that Two for the Money is "inspired by a true story." Problem is, it's just not that inspired.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As scripted by Cathy Rabin and directed by Santosh Sivan, Before the Rains is never less than compelling, but never more than adequately realized.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Visually dazzling but ultimately dizzying ride, a trippy suspenser that gets tripped up on its own deja vu voodoo.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A black comedy, a character study, and a thriller, Lord of War lacks the gritty, hell-bent hilarity of David O. Russell's contemporary war pic, "Three Kings."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Emily Watson, looking at home in her '40s frocks, plays Angus' mother - coping not only with her son's obsession with what she believes to be an imaginary friend, but also with her own worry and grief about her husband at war.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Washington offers another of his rock-steady performances, playing a career civil servant with a couple of secrets of his own, but confident, diligent, ready to go the distance for the city he loves.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The problem with Captain America: The Winter Soldier is that there's too much going on: the Marvel Universe stuff, the WikiLeaks-ish paranoia stuff, the video game-ish CG visual effects stuff, the epic John Woo-ish everybody-pointing-a-weapon-at-everybody-else face-off stuff.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Yes, there's a hastily added new ending - an ending that doesn't make sense when you think about it. Not that it's worth the effort
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Williamson's screenplay doesn't match the cleverness of his conceit; it lacks the requisite archness and wit.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Easy to like, and easy to forget.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Doesn't run very deep, or resonate with profound meaning. But as a thoughtful fable, laced with humor, the picture has its charms.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Doesn't have the dramatic heft to warrant all its angst and anguish.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A harmless and mildly amusing family comedy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Duplicity zips from one elaborate piece of hugger-mugger to the next. But at a certain point (for me, it was Rome), boredom sets in.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A stage-y but likable ensemble piece.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Perhaps to compensate for the absence of compelling drama and tension (and a few continuity gaffes), Scott has retreated to his TV commercial roots and crammed Hannibal full of busy, art-directed visuals.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A jukebox musical that's astonishingly cornball one minute, winkingly sardonic the next.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An odd and entertaining mix of backstage melodrama, indie verite, and "Showgirls" kitsch, the usual gender stereotypes are upturned.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's not dull, exactly, but neither is it much fun.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Directed in workmanlike style by Underworld: Evolution's Len Wiseman, has its share of wild stunts and spectacular carnage, but it feels pokey and predictable, too.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Efron, who wears an "All glory is fleeting" tattoo on his back and a soulful look on his face, gets to be more of a grown-up in The Lucky One than in most of what he's done before.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The best thing about The Life Before Her Eyes, a somber meditation on fate and friendship, is the way it captures the close relationship between two teenage girls.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The best reason to see Along Came Polly is the supporting cast.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lockout is genre all the way. The film wears its colors proudly, but it also, alas, wears out its welcome.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Hoodwinked may be a poor cousin to the Shrek franchise, but this made-on-the-cheap computer-animated feature still has more style and snarky gags than Disney's recent CG hit, "Chicken Little."
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    For soccer aficionados, Kicking & Screaming boasts some fairly cool play, courtesy of Alessandro Ruggiero and Francesco Liotti, two kids who play "the Italians."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Sappy, sentimental and redeemed only by the quiet radiance and fidgety intelligence of its leads, Last Chance Harvey is a fantasy about mopey middle-agers getting a second chance at love.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A mild and merry romp about family, friends and sexual identity.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Never going to be remembered as a tying-the-knot screwball classic (it probably won't be remembered past March), but one could do worse.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The movie devolves into a kind of high-tech Flash Gordon, with Ra as a cross- dressed Ming and Russell and Spader as the heroes required to chase big lugs with ray-guns around the inside of a pyramid. Things get pretty brainless before it's over, although Russell does get to deliver a great send-off line. [28 Oct 1994, p.5]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Invincible works, simply but provocatively, as a parable about the oppressed and the oppressors, victimhood and fanaticism.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Wood, for her part, can appear sad, or seductive, or mysterious, or happy, or lovestruck, or deeply troubled. Gabi is also very good with a gun, so look out.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's a sign on the way into Norway, or at least a sign that somebody from the film crew put up: "On the eighth day, God created baseball." If amen is your answer to that, then The Final Season is the movie for you.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Watts' Evelyn is a tricky character - it should be entertaining having her around in the cloven-in-two-to-cash-in-at-the-box-office final installments.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Then Death feels the need to intrude again. And again. If his accent weren't so charming, his voice so resonant, it would be depressing, all this meddling and mortality.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Internship itself would be kind of charming, too, if this Google-recruitment film, this 119-minute commercial for Googliness, weren't so downright creepy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Take "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids," throw some "Antz" on it, and you have The Ant Bully.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A dark-and-stormy sci-fi shoot-'em-up directed by McG, T4 has enough hardware and havoc to satisfy the crowd of action junkies and gamers who sped to "X-Men Origins: Wolverine" on opening weekend. (Terminator Salvation is a couple of liquid metal drops' more satisfying, but only a couple.)
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's a lot of rambling and shambling going on in these overlapping stories, often to the point where Explicit Ills no longer feels like it has a point.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    August: Osage County is the movie equivalent of Denny's Lumberjack Slam breakfast. If eggs, bacon, and toast aren't enough, throw in some ham, some sausage, pancakes, and hash browns. And then throw in more ham.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    That the film, directed in swift strokes by F. Gary Gray from a screenplay credited to Kurt Wimmer, doesn't really work - unrelentingly grim, unintentionally funny - is almost beside the point. It's a wild concept.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There is a lot of finger-pointing. Assertions are made, theories offered, but not much in the way of certainty.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A massive compendium of youth-movie/pedal-to-the-metal cliches. But man, is it fast!
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Scott shoots and edits Unstoppable with roller-coaster momentum and an eye (and ear) on that roaring tonnage of steel.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An OK sports doc that owes as much to reality TV competitions as it does to the genre of nautical cinema.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A likable if not exactly groundbreaking comedy.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Mostly about delivering thrills, and chills, and this it does with moderate success and a bunch of fast, no-nonsense edits.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lacks the origin-story freshness of its predecessor (even if the inaugural Garfield Spider-Man came only five years after the final installment of the Sam Raimi-directed Tobey Maguire Spider-Man trilogy). It lacks a charismatic central character, too.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Scott and Davis bring heart-rending sadness and telling detail to their roles, and imbue Secret Lives with something real and true.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite some fine, nuanced acting (it's Lane's movie, to be sure), Unfaithful doesn't get much deeper than a romance novel.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The beautiful Wright Penn has a harder time anchoring the free-spirited Clare in territory that feels honest and true - there's a stagey quality to the actress' performance that goes beyond the stagey quality of her character.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There isn't a real, flesh-and-blood figure in the bunch. Everything about Red Tails - the breaking down of racial barriers, the military achievements, the courage and sacrifice - is diminished in the process.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Circumstance is more interesting for its cultural views than for its insights into love, sex, family angst, and rebellious youth.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A roiling, boiling mix of blaxploitation, sexploitation, Tennessee Williams and the Tennessee outback.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An entertaining history lesson. That is, a history lesson that synopsizes and simplifies a complex life and complicated times into easily digestible panels of action, intrigue, martyrdom and sticking it to the papacy.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In some ways, Identity Thief is a raunchier variation on another recent odd-couple road pic: Barbra Streisand and Seth Rogen as overbearing mom and nebbish son in "The Guilt Trip."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    When it works - and it doesn't half the time - it's as if Monty Python were back, putting its merrily imbecilic stamp on the dark world of terrorism.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    More a deification than a documentary.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's a great movie out now about magicians, sleight-of-hand maestros, illusionists, card and coin tricksters. Now You See Me is not that movie.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Nunez's dialogue, and the paces he puts this threesome through, just don't ring true. Coastlines is the stuff of pulp, seriously at odds with what the writer-director has always done best. That is, show the inner workings of people, their needs, their fears, their small dreams.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's not just Hollywood convention that gets in the way of the story, it's the lack of depth, heft and heart at its core.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite the charismatic efforts of the British actor Ahmed, The Reluctant Fundamentalist gets bogged down in proselytizing and plot.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In truth, despite more corn than Mel Gibson grows on his farm in "Signs" (another Shyamalan effort), After Earth is worth a look.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There is a lot of shield-your-eyes ickiness in District 9, a lot of violence and gore. What there is not a lot of, however, is humanity - even in the film's depiction of the inhumanity humans are capable of.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite all the stock characters and scenarios, Fox and company manage to bring things to life. And cut some hair.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A meditation on guilt, remorse and redemption -- is unrelentingly heavy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Neither fish nor fowl (nor extraterrestrial), and that's a problem. Craig, handsomely craggy, plays it straight, and like Eastwood's Man With No Name, he doesn't have much to say.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's bleak business, and as it hurries toward its explosive, expository conclusion, the film becomes nonsensical, too.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Too much of the action in Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit takes place on laptops, thumb drives, and video monitors.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Charged up with stormy melodrama.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Laced with a venomous wit, and turning progressively creepier as it unfolds, writer-director Jon Reiss' movie offers a black-humored study of suppressed rage, sexual gamesmanship, domination and subordination.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Rocker can be amusingly dopey, with its "Spinal Tap"-ish lampooning of rock idioms - and idiots.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    All the running, the hiding, the escaping (from giant moles, from giant Murray) are decidedly less exciting, and compelling, than City of Ember wants to be.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The good thing about The Company is that nothing much happens. The bad thing about The Company is that nothing much happens.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Unfortunately, David Koepp - the A-list Hollywood screenwriter (Jurassic Park, War of the Worlds) and decidedly less-successful director (Ghost Town, Secret Window) - can't find the right Looney Tunes-ish tone for his immersion into bike-messenger culture.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Mostly The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest belongs to Mikael Blomkvist (Michael Nyqvist), the tall and intrepid magazine journalist who is determined to clear Lisbeth's name, and who goes about doing so - and making espresso and checking his e-mail - with zeal.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    If The Brothers Grimm flies apart like a badly designed airplane (and it does), it still has more going for it than most of the movie fare this summer.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    If your idea of a fun night out is to be manipulated by freaky sound effects, jumpy edits, and point-of-view shots of ceiling fans whooshing menacingly, Insidious is the film for you.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Oh so slight and forgettable.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In the wake of the Oscar-winning "The Hurt Locker" - a far better film, and one with a less strident, less obvious agenda - Green Zone arrives looking strangely anachronistic.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Occasionally clicks into full-speed farce mode, but never for long - or for long enough.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Situation deserves credit for not trying to reduce the events in Iraq to facile equations. There is corruption and cynicism on all sides: the U.S. diplomats and military, the Sunni leaders, the thugs in cop uniforms, the local powerbrokers.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A larky throwback to the breakneck screwballs of Frank Capra and Preston Sturges. Problem is, it isn't breakneck enough.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    If only RocknRolla's characters were at all believable - even in the context of its own cartoon universe.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The real problem is that there's nothing to George but the movie's props.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There's not a believable character, nor line of convincing dialogue to be found.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Run All Night isn't dull. The pace is breakneck, and necks get broken. But the violence is relentless, ugly, unredeemed by any real humanity.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Loaded with careening car chases and rooftop runs, glass-shattering shootouts and exploding fireballs, Killer Elite offers more than enough to keep action junkies happy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Stevenson is big and swarthy and not altogether without credibility, but he's got as much charisma as a potato.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    McKellen, Hanks and Tautou - and Alfred Molina, as a bishop with an agenda - are no slouches when it comes to emoting, but screenwriter Goldsman's rigorously faithful interpretation of Brown's flatfooted prose stylings is the filmic equivalent of putting big chewy baguettes in the actors' maws.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Too cute by half (or maybe three-quarters).
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    For all its visual delights, Magic in the Moonlight, the 44th feature written and directed by the admirably industrious Woody Allen, has to be one of his bigger duds.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The trailers already have given away the "surprise" cameos in The Expendables, so try not to blink when Stallone goes into a church (shades of John Woo) to meet his mystery boss, played by a bald-pated, trademark smirking Bruce Willis.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    And did I mention that it's long? It's long.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The offbeat comedy is not entirely devoid of charm, but its derivativeness is almost embarrassing.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Alas, it's a throwback that's thrown its back out - limping along, trailed by battalions of stereotypes and ammo rounds of cliche.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Reality aside, The Watch is harmless enough - and even occasionally humorous, in a riffy, sketch-comedy kind of way.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It has its moments of swaggering camaraderie, but more often just feels generic, derivative and done to death.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Fairy-tale-like musing on true love in cynical times.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Alternately tedious, cliched and unintentionally funny.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Dumb, dumb, dumb - borrowing scare tactics from Hitchcock and other suspense masters, but forgetting basic story.telling essentials such as character development and logical exposition.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Zemeckis, who blazed trails mixing live-action with animation in "Who Framed Roger Rabbit," blazes not even a footpath here.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There's nothing Disneyesque about this bomb except the forced levity of its musical score.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    "There's nothing here!" screams Romina Mondello - Kurylenko's Euro gal pal, walking the deserted sidewalks of this Anytown, U.S.A. Boy, truer words . . ..
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Despite its penchant for the crude and lewd, is gooey in ways that have nothing to do with bodily fluids.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    xXx
    Less a movie than a collection of pretty cool action set-pieces, linked together with some seriously awful acting and dialogue that even Dr. Evil couldn't deliver with a straight face.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The Weather Man belongs to a school of earnest, artsy Hollywood flicks that includes the Michael Douglas-goes-bonkers "Falling Down," and a lineage that goes back to revered 1970s pics like "Five Easy Pieces."
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    At this point in her career, Lopez can clearly bend the universe -- but no amount of bending can make Enough anything more than formulaic.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Stiff but handsome film, there's little sense of the conflict and complexities that drove Alma Mahler.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    By the end of Machine Gun Preacher, its title character has become a cartoon.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    With clunky dialogue...I Am Number Four puts the burden on its special effects (passable) and the chemistry between Pettyfer and Agron.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    If illuminating dawns and dusks had basked Mia Wasikowska and Henry Hopper in a rosy glow, the mopey cuteness of Restless would have been too much to bear.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Jeremy Irons slithers on board with a haughty sneer and papal vestments, playing Bishop Pucci.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A creaky, cliched, feel-good family drama about learning to stop and smell the roses - and planting a vegetable garden while you're at it - Uncle Nino is shameless, sappy fare.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Dizzyingly incoherent and subversively surreal, this sophomore effort from the man who made the great, strange "Donnie Darko" is certain to have its fans. I'm not going to be one of them.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Has its compelling moments, and its playfully inventive ones, too.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A big comedown from "The Fighter," Contraband finds Wahlberg in default mode: With his Popeye biceps and broody stares, the actor can do a character like Chris without even thinking about it - and that's what he does here.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There's real hypocrisy here. If a movie like Fifty Shades of Grey is supposed to offer a voyeuristic experience - and not a ridiculous experience - have some integrity about your nudity. Despite what the filmmakers may want to believe, there isn't a lot else going on here. Fifty Shades of Grey Matter, not so much.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Jonathan and Christopher Nolan's adaptation of this novel by Christopher Priest offers three acts of exasperating muddle.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Not exactly a hundred million dollars' worth of classic comedy.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Unravels in a series of spooky dream sequences, dopey detective work, and a couple of richly hambone-ian De Niro soliloquies.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Just about the only folks likely to find this humdrum hybrid of "Mission: Impossible" and "The Wind in the Willows" worthy for consideration are non-discriminating pip-squeaks.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    With a clamorous soundtrack and a whirl of elaborate chases and busily choreographed fight scenes, this is Sherlock Holmes with Attention Deficit Disorder.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A sappy excursion to Edwardian days.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Think Jerry Lewis doing Eminem, or maybe it's Eminem doing Jerry Lewis (or maybe it's Pauly Shore doing Vanilla Ice), and you've got B-Rad.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A bummer.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Has the disjointed feel of a bunch of strung-together TV episodes.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Level of humor: subteen.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    In the future, in the past, at all points along the space-time continuum, the Theory of the Teenage Male Mind throws everything out of whack.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    In essence, a wild soap opera disguised as a political allegory, it's a movie, with its over-the-map performances, that is worth catching only for the inadvertent laugh or two.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    If only the screenplay had more going for it than hackneyed homilies and living-in-the-ghetto stereotypes. If only first-time director Sunu Gonera had a surer hand, a knack for something bolder, wilder, goofier.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    While The Sitter isn't that dumb, or dreadful, there really isn't much going on here.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Has a dark, low-budget feel and an incongruous combination of self-consciously jokey patter and gross-out gore.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Shows glimmers of great drama, but jettisons too much essential cargo (character development, relationships, plot, common sense) in an effort to be lean and clean.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Vacancy, in the end, simply offers a particularly aggressive brand of couples counseling.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Gritty, jumpy and rife with cliches.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The real problem isn't with the actors, it's with 1) the source material, a highfalutin romance novel with a clever literary conceit, and 2) LaBute's clumsy, uncomfortable efforts to telescope Byatt's book into a workable movie.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Relying on improv-y riffing and watch-them-coming-from-down-the-block-and-around-the-corner sight gags, The Campaign is intermittently amusing, but more often just interminable.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    What are you going to do when your lead actress offers a performance that's as unlikable as the woman she's portraying? Maybe it's the script (flimsy, formulaic), or filmmaker Alejandro Gomez Monteverde's conspicuous direction, but Tammy Blanchard's Nina, a waitress with a dour disposition and an unwanted pregnancy, pretty much sucks the life out of this well-meaning melodrama.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There's nothing original, nor compelling, about Twist.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Not even Halle Berry, emerging from the blue Caribbean in an orange two-piece -- can bring this thing to life.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Feels more like a postscript than a probing, provocative documentary.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A silly melodrama.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Far-fetched and utterly humorless, with a literally tacked-on conclusion (yes, more text on the screen), the only thing that's surprising about Unbreakable is how lame it is.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Cute, cloying and catastrophically predictable.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It's simplistic and reactionary and designed to get hearts pumping but not minds thinking.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The film's intimations of bisexual romance have a certain innate drama that no amount of bad acting or cornball rugby matches can completely erase.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The moral of Taken 2? If you're going on a family vacation, be sure that the human-trafficking ring you put out of business in that far more satisfying and suspenseful thriller from a few years ago doesn't know how to find you.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Death Sentence's message - that vengeance is ultimately futile, spinning out a vicious circle of rage and hate - may be commendable, but there's nothing noteworthy about the way Wan, Bacon and their troops go about delivering it.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Owen is all right as the harried husband whose relationship at home has turned frosty, but the essential heat between him and Aniston is missing. The actress succeeds in shedding her "Friends" persona, but there's something missing here, especially as things get knottier.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It isn't frightening. Sometimes, in fact, it's laughable.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Virtually every set-up and set-piece in this extravagantly tedious adventure is misleading, or worse, irrelevant.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It's nothing if not predictable.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    If you want to see a Renaissance faire turned into an apocalyptic battlefield, this is the ticket.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A long, tedious and convoluted follow-up to 2003's rollicking high-seas hit, The Curse of the Black Pearl, this second installment in the promised trilogy lacks the swash and buckle of the original. And then some.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Premonition is an odd little thing, with a protagonist in a protracted fugue state and a plot that doesn't know whether its coming or going. Or maybe it does.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Shot like a Disney period piece (prettily, with spiffy props, shiny vintage vehicles, and costumes just back from the cleaners), Flyboys introduces its squadron the old-fashioned way: with character-establishing setups.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Rock Star sinks into a morass of melodrama.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Most of it plays like Jackass.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A woefully thin and pointless musical comedy boasting the no-chemistry coupling of Cuba Gooding Jr. and Beyonc?
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    War is hell, war is cruelty, war is toil and trouble, war is just a shot away. But is war a snooze? Well, by the time Enemy at the Gates has run its course — it sure seems that way.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    An uninspired computer-animated feature that may satisfy undiscriminating pipsqueaks and nearly no one else, Planet 51 is a low-IQ E.T. in reverse.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Fuzzy, feel-good movie about baseball, babes and believing in yourself.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Promised Land is a frustrating film to watch. It should be better than this, smarter than this.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Full of clunky humor, battle-of-the-sexes musings and spicy accordion music, Everybody Wants to Be Italian is relentless - but not necessarily relentless fun.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The movie's main purpose seems to be to make audiences squirm uncomfortably. Yelp and shriek in armchair-clawing glee? Not likely.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Although its low-key realism is admirable, Eden doesn't really work: the long silences, the aching stares, the telling props, Breda's quivering blues, Billy's drunkenness, his distraction. There might as well be a sign stuck to the Farrells' front door: Dysfunctional family lives here.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Shot on the cheap, with cheesy animated credits and comic-panel "Bams!" and "Pows!" splashed across the screen, Super has a jokey, low-rent quality (or lack of quality) that could be endearing, if Wilson's performance weren't so nihilistically dull, and if there were somebody in the picture who had a soul.

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