For 1,974 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Control Room
Lowest review score: 0 Isn't She Great
Score distribution:
1974 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Johnny Depp, in bushy eyebrows, sinister mustache, and a suit and hat of fur, may be too cartoonishly lascivious for his own good as the wolf who pursues the girl in the scarlet cape to Grandmother's house. But then he gets to croon the couplet, "There's no way to describe what you feel / When you're talking to your meal." Delicious.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Whiplash is writer/director Damien Chazelle's hyperventilated nightmare about artistic struggle, artistic ambition. It's as much a horror movie as it is a keenly realized indie about jazz, about art, about what it takes to claim greatness.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Night at the Museum tent pole has played fast and loose with history, and with our knowledge, or lack of knowledge, of the past. But I'm pretty sure a capuchin monkey never urinated on teensy-weensy figures of a cowboy and a Roman emperor as they ran for their lives from a lava flow in ancient Pompeii. That happens in Secret of the Tomb, and it seems like a fitting way to retire the show.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It seems sadly apt that the Daddy Warbucks figure played by Jamie Foxx in the new Annie is a cellphone mogul. Because Foxx is pretty much phoning in his performance.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    If you want to see a Renaissance faire turned into an apocalyptic battlefield, this is the ticket.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Something about the way the film has been assembled doesn't feel altogether organic.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    As for Bale, he seems to have lost his compass. His accent strays, his famous intensity wasted on clunky dialogue.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Footage from VanDyke's travels provides the first-person narrative thrust to Point and Shoot, but Curry's interviews with VanDyke, back in his Baltimore home, are what give the film its larger, more challenging context.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Babadook, then, is a study in madness that lurks beneath the surface. But it is also very much (and amusingly) a look at the trials of parenting, especially single-parenting: those days when you just want to, well, get your child out of the picture somehow. Of course, you don't act on those impulses. That's what the movies are for.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Parental units who manage to remain conscious through the kiddie-centric proceedings can either savor, or groan at, Malkovich's bespectacled Octavius barking punny, celebrity name-dropping orders to his minions.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    Foxcatcher is a story of wealth and the lack of it, of family connection and disconnection. But more than anything, it is a story of a mind unraveling. The result is devastating drama for those of us looking on.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At a certain point, The Homesman will take you by surprise. By the end, a ferry ride across the Missouri River, it will take your heart.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Directed by Terrence Malick's editor and protégé, A.J. Edwards, The Better Angels abounds with Malick-ian moments: upward-pointing cameras capturing bodies wheeling through fields, plaintive voice-overs punctuated by Jew's harp and birdsong, a tendency to drift toward the sky and its moody tableau of clouds.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Redmayne should be getting a lot of notice for his performance; it's palpable, it's poignant. Jones, too, is terrific. And Marsh, who won the documentary Academy Award for his Philippe Petit Twin Towers caper Man on Wire, brings a keen artistry to The Theory of Everything.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Einsteinian, Kubrickian, Malickian, Steinbeckian - Interstellar, Christopher Nolan's epically ambitious space opera, is all that. And more. And, alas, less.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Lieberher, a Philly native transplanted to L.A., is a reed-thin, wide-eyed wonder. There's none of that precocious Hollywood child-actor stuff going on; he's seriously thinking about what he has to say, assessing his words and their implications. It's rare to see any actor - let alone a novice, barely out of the single digits - so readily and naturally displaying inner thought in front of the camera.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Monaghan is stronger still. This is a performance that deserves to be noticed. She is crushingly good.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Although it's pretty much impossible to avoid the cliches and constructs of a war movie, Ayer pushes his actors to find the adrenalized fear, and fire, in their guts. Pitt brings "Wardaddy" alive in ways that put his cartoonish "Inglourious Basterds" Army lieutenant to shame. Lerman's rabbity dread is palpable.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    With its improvisatory score (drummer Antonio Sanchez provides a hustling backbeat throughout), its seamless shots, its leaps into the surreal, and then back again into the excruciating, embarrassing real, Birdman ascends to the greatest of heights.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Men, Women & Children isn't a cartoon. It wants to be real, terribly. Instead, it's just terrible.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    British screen stalwarts Bill Nighy and Imelda Staunton appear as locals - he twitchy and reticent, she chatty and full of cheer, both with their hearts in the right place.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is Highsmith, and so things do not go as planned for her protagonists. The Two Faces of January - drop-dead gorgeous to behold - is not a merry tale, but a murderous one. Murderously good.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Sure, there's a witty reference to another, vastly more momentous legal drama (To Kill a Mockingbird, Robert Duvall's film debut). And yes, Farmiga gets to call out Downey, and stay in character, for "that hyper-verbal vocabulary vomit thing that you do." Small pleasures, in a bigger mess.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Even with a voice-over narration, and conversations with her dog, Robyn's nomadic quest is full of grand silences, all the better to take in the sky, the rocks, the world spinning underfoot. Wasikowska plays this wordless wanderer just right. That is, she makes her real.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If a movie with suicide as a central theme can be deemed funny, then writer/director Craig Johnson has pulled it off, mixing heartache and humor and giving Wiig, especially, the opportunity to shine.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    That's something else Ridley and his actors do: make you appreciate what a life it was - impossibly short, impossibly brilliant.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a wondrous mix of the momentous and mundane, the profound and the perverse, with Cave blues-talking his way through the goofy juxtapositions, the darkness, and the light.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Equalizer, which reteams Washington with his Training Day director, Fuqua, is an origin story, like the birth of Batman, or Daredevil. If audiences and star are so inclined, it's easy to see this premise and this character - a tough, taciturn gent burdened with regret and a very special skill set - going into Roman numerals.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's bleak business, and as it hurries toward its explosive, expository conclusion, the film becomes nonsensical, too.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Love Is Strange has a gentleness about it, and an empathy, that inspire.

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