Tasha Robinson

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For 633 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Tasha Robinson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Coraline
Lowest review score: 0 Sydney White
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 60 out of 633
633 movie reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    Sky Blue is never subtle about its images of loneliness and isolation, or in fact about anything else. But as clichéd as its images are, they're still visually and tonally stunning.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    It’s a ready-made cult movie, complicated and weird and grotesque and distinctly silly, and best when not taken remotely seriously.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    Early on, it feels like it might become one of Allen’s best. Then the narrative direction becomes clear, the possibilities narrow, and the film shuts down along with them.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    The film is as low-key and internal as the meditation it touts, and nearly as uplifting.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    In some moments, White God is a fast-moving thriller... At other times, it’s a standard-issue slasher movie... But when Mundruczó pushes the camera in close on Lili or Hagen, it just becomes a family drama, and a portrait of longing—for freedom, for emotional reciprocity, for comfort.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    Begin Again is all about the untrammeled joys of music, but like a hit pop song, it works better in the emotions than it does through any close examination.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    Garcia's far-more-info-than-tainment style seems a little staid, but Future Of Food's clear, intelligent journalism and rich cinematography help take the edges off the immense brick of data Garcia lobs through the window of America's biotech industry.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    Iris isn’t groundbreaking doc filmmaking, but it’s amiable and jovial in a way rarely seen in the field, which tends more toward drama, trauma, and forwarding big causes. Maysles doesn’t seem to have an agenda, beyond capturing Apfel as she is in this moment, as a complete, highly specific, and thoroughly charming character.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    It’s sloppy and slippery, but for a $5 million movie, it’s remarkable.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    Batkid’s story is fun in part because it’s so joyously frivolous. He’s cute because he’s a tiny version of a big thing. Trying to blow him up into something bigger than he is spoils some of what makes him special.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    As with so many Merchant-Ivory films, The White Countess glides along on restrained, skillful performances and tapestry-rich cinematography, but its beating heart lies deep below the surface, where only determined viewers will find it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    Animated in much the same style as "Perfect Blue," but with greater depth and a more elaborate sense of playfulness, Millennium Actress is a visual feast, but also a mental gymnastics routine.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    Deep Blue is a thrilling film, but not a thoughtful one; it'd be right at home on an IMAX screen, or possibly as the pretty, polished, and vaguely empty Successories poster it closely resembles.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    Keanu Reeves is the perfect figurehead for this kind of yarn, as he was in The Matrix: Emotionless, poreless, and polished, his character is more a graven idol of vengeance than a human being seeking it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    It's a difficult balancing act, but Park crafts his layers carefully and masterfully. He's the kind of filmmaker who can meaningfully craft the gory details of an eye-gouging without ever forgetting the message that an eye for an eye leaves the whole world blind.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    None of Ex Machina’s broad strokes are surprising: The story falls out so predictably at every stage that it can be frustrating. It’s the details that are surprising, and purposefully alarming.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    For all its rough, unfinished edges, The Wolfpack is absolutely mesmerizing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    Sayles' version of reality is grim, but it provides an enlightening, grounding reminder that there's a far more crucial world of politics going on behind the headlines.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    There’s a good deal of the sick-and-twisted element of The ABCs Of Death here, but managed with better pacing, more maturity, and more room to build each segment.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    Howard and Morgan make the journey intense enough to keep audiences guessing up to the finish line.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    Uekrongtham films the saga in gorgeous style.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    Episodic, detached, and lacking in drive, but packed with amazing, hallucinatory dream-imagery that makes real dreams look flat by comparison.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    Taken as a whole, Blackfish does an admirable job of preaching without force-feeding, seamlessly blending opinion with reportage, and addressing its central issues from enough angles to make a series of end-runs around dubious viewers.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Tasha Robinson
    The film sometimes seems to get lost in self-admiration and its own melancholy mood. Still, Amirpour maintains that mood exquisitely well.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 69 Tasha Robinson
    From a technical and filmmaking standpoint, nothing about Joshua: Teenager vs. Superpower stands out.... It’s as dry and straightforward as a reputable news report. But from a content standpoint, the film is riveting.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 69 Tasha Robinson
    Birth Of A Nation is powerful and effective, but it's spectacle that can't humanize or define its subject.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 69 Tasha Robinson
    Favreau and Marks’ version is surprisingly daring in its use of violence, and its physical and emotional darkness. It’s also creative, occasionally in bizarre and colorful ways.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 69 Tasha Robinson
    Comedy is rarely sympathetic to its victims, but by letting all the major characters serve as each other's karma engines, Stoller and the other writers create a hilarious world where everyone can be equally awful, and equally heroic, and equally ridiculous.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 68 Tasha Robinson
    Waltz is the perfect villain in this setting: He's played this exact role before, as the smug, drawling, creepy aesthete who rarely stops smiling. But he's also capable of pivoting on a dime between real menace and garish, performative evil, between playing a subdued charmer, and the kind of movie-serial baddie who ties women to railroad tracks.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 68 Tasha Robinson
    Star Trek: Beyond does have a strength that its two reboot predecessors lacked: it puts the focus squarely on the larger Trek ensemble, rather than solely on Kirk and his relationships.

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