For 157 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1 point lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Tim Robey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Play
Lowest review score: 20 RED
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 50 out of 157
  2. Negative: 13 out of 157
157 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    It’s extremely moving in the gentlest, most linear way, and the other performances are sterling, too.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    If films were gestures, this one would be a perfectly timed shrug, with the smile to match.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    It’s beautifully organised, and there’s no way you could possibly watch it without learning all kinds of stuff.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    It’s wonderful.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    Where we might have expected a gentle or rueful coda, we get a battle of the sexes as blistering as the best of Tracy/Hepburn, and infinitely more frank.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    Despite borrowing cleverly from the best, It Follows still manages to feel like no other example in recent years - tender, remarkably ingenious and scalp-pricklingly scary.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    Elicits from McQueen a directing job that's compellingly humble but also majestic, because his radical showmanship is turned to such precise, human purposes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    The movie is hauntingly romantic at heart, in the best spirit of a Gothic fairytale, but without the harsh shadows or hard edges.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    It tests our presumptions, makes us squirm.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    It’s a stunningly confident piece of filmmaking, which holds on to vital clues about how much time has elapsed, and what’s happened, then springs them on us. The performances slay you.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    David Oyelowo has never given a better performance. He seems to penetrate into King’s soul and camps out there for two hours. He’s tremendous, of course, when electrifying his congregation at the podium, but a sense of fatigue is even more paramount.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    It’s really a radical experiment in non-fiction cinema – not seeking to enlighten or inform, but to disorientate us, practically to drown us, in a nightmare vision of the ocean’s power.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    Call it a landlocked variant on Robinson Crusoe, but it’s a hypnotic one, with a sense of mystery and interior life that are all its own.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    There's evident patience and intelligence to the filmmaking all over, as well as an engagement with genuine ideas about diplomacy, deterrence, law and leadership. However often it risks monkey-mad silliness, it's impressively un-stupid.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    You’ve never seen a documentary like The Act of Killing. If you saw too many like it, your hold on sanity might fray, which is not so much the film’s fault as that of its bloodcurdling subject. This movie is essential.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    This is in no way the remorselessly grim film its subject matter might lead you to expect – it’s full of life, irony, poetry and bitter unfairness. It demands respect, but it also earns it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    Abi Morgan's script – better, for my money, than her work on either Shameor The Iron Lady – elegantly straddles two timelines to illuminate a deliberately obscured life
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    A good cop/bad cop action comedy with the funniest two-women-above-the-title pairing in memory.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    Vogt gives us a brilliantly slippery handle on the rules of this rather twisted game, but also makes it real, in that it’s coming from a place of authentic terror, anxiety and loneliness in Ingrid’s head. Intellectually exciting though his film’s gambits are, they feel like acts of tremendous imaginative empathy – lightbulbs in the dark.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    Everything’s told in shards, and Amalric does very well to create a sense of emotional continuum amid all the procedural detail. His own performance is fantastic, jittery and dishevelled.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    Poitras sets the saga on a low simmer, while the Social Network-like score throbs away.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    Baumbach packs his film with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play, right down to a climax which wants us to notice how much juggling he’s doing with his ideas.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    '71
    The film’s stark realism and bruising impact are enough in themselves, but the risk, and the real artistic payoff, is its bold sensory plunge into this Hadean inferno.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    This excellent film is a sequel and knows it, and wants us to know that it knows it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    While admitting the man’s flaws, Coogler chooses to give Oscar the benefit of the doubt, which is precisely what he didn’t get on that platform just after midnight struck.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    Great art it's not – but it's frisky, in charge of itself, and about as keenly felt a vision of this S&M power game we could realistically have expected to see.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    On his broadest canvas yet, Trapero mounts a saga about the role of conscience, which might seem old-fashioned if it weren’t so urgently imagined. An added fillip is Michael Nyman’s stirring score, his best in years.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    There’s nothing Saulnier does better here than unveil his premise and bring the siblings together for their handful of scenes, but his film remains deftly shot and dynamic to the end.

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