Todd McCarthy

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For 1,581 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Todd McCarthy's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Downsizing
Lowest review score: 0 Showgirls
Score distribution:
1581 movie reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A dash of showbiz pizzazz has been lost but some welcome emotional depth has been gained in the big-screen version of the still-thriving theatrical smash Jersey Boys.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    9
    Design aspects are arresting and the filmmaker's abilities are obvious, but the basic survival story remains slight, just as the general setting, no matter how artfully imagined, is by now pretty familiar.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A tad crasser and pushier than its predecessor, Ice Age: The Meltdown is still an entirely serviceable follow-up to the 2002 hit that will thoroughly amuse kids and get a rise or two out of parents as well.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Promised Land presents its environmental concerns in a clear, upfront manner but hits some narrative and character bumps in the second half that weaken the impact of this fundamentally gentle, sympathetic work.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A picture that, even more than the previous two, feels like a bunch of gags tossed together. The laughs are here, to be sure, although even some of the best of them are retreads and the Swinging '60s recycling act is now feeling a bit past its zeitgeist prime.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Unswervingly sincere and dramatic without surprise or revelation, screenwriter Joe Eszterhas' longtime pet project may be personal, but it offers little to audiences that hasn't been served up in quantity in the past.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 plays like a second ride on a roller-coaster that was a real kick the first time around but feels very been-there/done-that now.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    One of the more absorbing and palatable entries in the rather disreputable "Death Wish"-style self-appointed vigilante sub-genre.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A crudely funny farce that covers no new ground but sees its talented players running some surefire plays.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A mostly standard-issue latter-day Arnold Schwarzenegger actioner spiked with a creepily plausible cloning angle.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    From a performance p.o.v., Aselton and Shepard hold the screen well and are most watchable, and Aselton does a fluid directing job within the limited challenge she set for herself production-wise.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Brandishes physical verisimilitude and intelligent seriousness but proves unable to really get inside its chameleon-like central character.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Even as a quasi-experimental work of subjective surrealism, Escape From Tomorrow is massively erratic and isn't particularly original. But it must also be said that its take on Disney World, as well as many of its individual images, are indelible and won’t be easily forgotten.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    To use what, under the circumstances, is a far too convenient metaphor, Bay is interested in accelerating from zero to 100 as quickly as possible and then maintaining speed, rather than skillfully shifting gears and adjusting speeds based on curves, hills and road conditions. In this case, he gets you there, but you know the ride could have been a lot more varied and nuanced.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Beautifully made pic will spur newsy media coverage and possible consternation on both sides of the Israeli-Palestinian divide, but members of the general public will be glancing at their watches rather than having epiphanies about world peace.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Replete with smart, capable characters and crimes so bizarre that they lend the film a suspiciously lurid nature, this tony suspenser is hampered by the presence of a villain who is all too obvious from the very beginning.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Refreshingly revisionist in the sense that it takes a relatively clear-eyed view of the messy lives and equivocal circumstances of many of the key participants.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    After quite a few tedious detours and distractions, when the film finally gets down to the business of a climax at a gathering of elite European diplomats in a precariously perched Swiss mountain castle, it becomes not half-bad.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    The picture's constant forward movement and breezy sense of amusement about itself provide a certain mild sort of diversion.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Generates a fair amount of tension and produces the kind of nationalistic outrage that rock-ribbed Americans will feel in their guts.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Remains exciting as long as it stays on the mountains.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    All the more frustrating because of its conceptual freshness and Ben Affleck's sly turn in the title role, this sleek action thriller ends up delivering standard shoot-'em-up goods after initially suggesting it might provide something rather different.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Most of the action is played for broad laughs, and Hogan demonstrates the ability to generate them, even if the humor is very base and often cruel, making fun of people's looks and ineptitude.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Entirely respectable in every way, it nonetheless has a very cool body temperature and thus likely will inspire polite admiration rather than excitement among viewers.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Callahan mostly overcomes its grungy technical quality with entertaining dialogue, nervy confrontation scenes, decent thesping and some truly spectacular shooting on the green velvet.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    An intensely whimsical shaggy-dog crime story that ricochets between goofy violence and some endearing personal moments.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Outrageously grungy and whacked-out walk on the wild side.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Engrossing but psychologically shallow tale.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Absorbing in a low-key way but more dramatic where its secondary characters are concerned than its leads, and capped by climactic incidents that are less than entirely convincing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Director Spike Jonze's sharp instincts and vibrant visual style can't quite compensate for the lack of narrative eventfulness that increasingly bogs down this bright-minded picture.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Che
    If the director has gone out of his way to avoid the usual Hollywood biopic conventions, he has also withheld any suggestion of why the charismatic doctor, fighter, diplomat, diarist and intellectual theorist became and remains such a legendary figure; if anything, Che seems diminished by the way he's portrayed here.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Deliberately unvarnished shock piece designed to give pause to anyone with a daughter approaching teenhood.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    The characters and settings are attractively designed, and the vocal performances have real color and a sense of fun that gently undercuts the treacly sincerity of certain obligatory kid-pandering moments.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    The battle of the sexes is restaged to clever but inconsequential effect in Conversations With Other Women. Very much a case of old wine in a new bottle.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Unquestionably the most sexually graphic American narrative feature ever made outside the realm of the porn industry, John Cameron Mitchell's ambitious attempt to merge his characters' active sexual lives with more conventional emotional content is playfully and provocatively entertaining for roughly the first half, but loses staying power thereafter when investment in the uncompelling characters' problems is requested.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Coppola’s attitude toward her subject seems equivocal, uncertain; there is perhaps a smidgen of social commentary, but she seems far too at home in the world she depicts to offer a rewarding critique of it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Inspiring if not inspired, Lee Daniels' The Butler is a sort of Readers' Digest overview of the 20th century American civil rights movement centered on an ordinary individual with an extraordinary perspective.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Life may be as unfair and arbitrary as Solondz portrays it, but it is arguably more diverse in its moods and its ups and downs. The pic may not be a dog, but nor is it likely to become anyone’s best friend.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Duplass and Moss are put to the test to carry the film entirely on their shoulders and unquestionably carry it off... On the other hand, viewers will have widely disparate reactions to spending 90 uninterrupted minutes with these characters.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Some fancy footwork in the writing and directing can't disguise the hoary "Ten Little Indians" origins of Identity.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Telling the entire story of Chaplin's 88 years was probably a hopeless goal, but the biopic does offer the saving grace of a truly remarkable central performance by Robert Downey Jr. and some lovely moments along the way.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Atom Egoyan's most mainstream and genre-oriented picture in his 20-year career applies a thick noir lacquer to a jumbled, time-jumping tale of a young female journalist prying the facts out of the aging entertainers and their cronies.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Unfortunately, after its fine start, this brainy slice of provocative speculative fiction slowly but surely loosens its grip on audience involvement rather than increasing it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Once the pieces are all in their places, the deliberate set-up begins to pay some dividends to those who relish the form.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    While not nearly as elaborate, nor as visually sophisticated as the last Mission: Impossible outing or the most recent Bonds, London Has Fallen is actually more plausible at its core, if not in its details, which is partly why it succeeds in laying claim to an audience's attention for the entirety of its swift running time.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Butler is in no way a hot-headed or contentious piece of agit-prop, unlike so many other election year documentaries; like Kerry himself, the film speaks to the mind, not the emotions.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Ambition markedly outstrips achievement in The Congress, a visionary piece of speculative fiction that drops the ball after a fine set-up.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    On its own terms, the plotting of "Devil" is absorbing, and the pieces actually fit together pretty decently. On the other hand, when scenes directly call to mind similar ones in "Chinatown," this effort's stepchild relationship to the classic is forcibly demonstrated.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    The antics here are strained, graceless and tiresomely crude, the sorts of things audiences feel they're supposed to laugh at rather than well-developed situations that generate genuine amusement.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    The pervasive chill, ugly feelings and downward spiral of the narrative make this a work that requires an equally sober, serious-minded attitude on the part of the viewer.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    After the accomplished smoothness of "Match Point," it's back to more ragged form in Scoop, despite the almost identical posh settings, and the return of Scarlett Johansson as leading lady.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Watching a bunch of people take a drug trip is seldom either entertaining or edifying, but Chilean director Sebastian Silva manages to make it at least tolerably amusing.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Reserved, careful and largely predictable in the way it plays out its wrenching emotional crises.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Although it will most readily appeal to cinephiles…offers sufficient reality-based incident and ponderable cultural issues to attract curious audiences.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    The lead role of a working class former smuggler who dirties his hands again to save his family fits Mark Wahlberg like a glove.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    The performances are all sincere and solid and the situation is easy to respond to emotionally. But as a case history in the annals of political repression, it feels like a bit of a side show.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Phantom is easily consumable eye candy, but it contains no nutrients for the heart or mind.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    More pictorially arresting than intellectually coherent.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    More palatable than most pictures of its ilk due to its keen awareness of its own preposterousness, a self-knowledge exuberantly expressed by a mostly live-wire cast.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Part absurdist drama, part personal observational commentary and part hormonal explosion, all seen through the filter of previous war pics, Sam Mendes' third feature has numerous arresting moments but never achieves a confident, consistent or sufficiently audacious tone.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Achieves a certain poignancy through its sensitivity to mortality in a context where illness and death are often thought of primarily in terms of gossip, blown deals and lost money.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    This material cant help but be interesting, even compelling up to a point, but its prosaic presentation suggests that the story's full potential, encompassing deep, disturbing and enduring pain on all sides of the issue, has only begun to be touched.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    The gifted fantasy/sci-fi/horror specialist has made a film that's very bloody, and bloody stylish at that, one that's certainly unequaled in its field for the beauty of its camerawork, sets, costumes and effects. But it's also conventionally plotted and not surprising or scary at all, as it resurrects hoary horror tropes from decades ago to utilize them in conventional, rather than fresh or subversive ways
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    All smoke and mirrors. With his third straight excursion into the supernatural, M. Night Shyamalan has begun revealing the hand that works his spooky tricks so much that the lack of substance is plainly seen.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Max
    The film is ultimately too glib in its suggestion that Hitler's discovering his career path was a matter of sheerest chance, even an accident.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Genre fans always looking for something new and awesome may feel like they've seen most of this before, but the conceptual and emotional strength of Summit's Nicolas Cage starrer largely carries the day.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    For a time, an appealing gentleness prevails that's rooted in this unique inter-generational romance, a feeling augmented in particular by Purnell's slow-blooming flower of a performance, and if the film had remained focused more on the improbabilities of this love story, it might have emerged as something rather special.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Nair's approach never entirely convinces, and the adaptation of the 900-plus-page book becomes increasingly episodic, making this Vanity Fair more a collection of intermittent pleasures than a satisfying emotional repast.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    The Ugly Truth is an arch, contrived, entirely predictable romantic comedy assembled with sufficient audience-friendly elements to put it over as both a good girls' night attraction and a date-night lure raunchy enough to leave couples in the right mood afterward.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A very mild animated entry from Disney with a distinctly recycled feel.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Blue Ruin is a talented but sophomoric low-budgeter that straddles the divide between genre thriller and art piece with mixed results.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A balanced, evenhanded film about a subject who has always managed to provoke intemperate reactions.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    No matter how silly and outlandish the action gets — and it does become ridiculous — it also delivers the goods its audience expects.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A not-bad futuristic actioner with three or four astounding sequences, an unusual hero, a nifty villain and less mythic and romantic resonance than might be desired.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Avengers: Age of Ultron succeeds in the top priority of creating a worthy opponent for its superheroes and giving the latter a few new things to do, but this time the action scenes don't always measure up and some of the characters are left in a kind of dramatic no-man's-land.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    As computer game-derived features go, it sure beats "Lara Croft: Tomb Raider."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A pictorially unusual but dramatically listless tale.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    This entertaining confection possesses the substance of the TV show, the pacing of a Hong Kong actioner and the production values of a James Bond thriller.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Egoyan's pedantic, lecturing approach makes the film a bit of a slog, although the basic material has an intrinsic interest that makes one at least want to know more about the historical events.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    It's hard to dislike a movie this light-hearted, but there's something terribly ephemeral about it as well; it's a film of complete weightlessness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Garcia’s take, however beautiful physically, is intellectually opaque and creatively cautious, leaving the interested viewer, whether or not a believer, with much to wonder about but little to actually chew on.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Amusingly eccentric rather than outright funny.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    While pic remains sympathetic and appealing, the endless dialogue and repetitive settings become wearing through the couple's one long night together, and the artifice of the premise may contribute to the difficulty the film has in coming to romantic life.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    For Altman, this is a major statement about American hypocrisy and society’s haves and have-nots, in line with many of his films, but issued in a kind of offhand way that delivers only glancing emotional impact.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    The ultimate effect of [Östlund's] studied techniques is more restricting than beneficial, which, combined with a protracted running time, faintly self-righteous air and a perplexing, misguided coda, produces a sense of letdown at the end despite the strength of much that has come before.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A frothy, lightweight romantic comedy that strives to seem richer and more complex than it really is.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    300
    A blustery, bombastic, visually arresting account of the Battle of Thermopylae as channeled through the rabid imagination of graphic novelist Frank Miller.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    After impressing well enough in his previous big screen directorial outings, Abrams works in a narrower, less imaginative mode here; there's little sense of style, no grace notes or flights of imagination. One feels the dedication of a young musician at a recital determined not to make any mistakes, but there's no hint of creative interpretation, personal feelings or the spreading of artistic wings.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Red State is cleverly contrarian enough to get a rise out of almost any audience.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    This reflection on the past, love and death through the prism of layers of theatrical endeavor is both serious and frisky, engaging on a refined level but frustratingly limited in its complexity and depth.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Cronenberg assumes a distinctly clinical approach to the emotional, social and business shenanigans on display here, a perspective that has brilliantly served some of his overtly psychological, horror and sci-fi pieces but gives this one a brittle and airless feel.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Just two weeks after successfully targeting boys with "Holes," Disney is giving girls something they want with this mild, quasi-romantic romp.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A blatant commodity designed to illustrate what a splendid influence the hit television show has been on the world at large, if the series' creators don't mind saying so themselves.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Although the film manages some disarming insights into the man’s complex makeup and difficult behavior, a service enhanced by Louis Garrel’s very good lead performance, serious cinephiles will likely reject it as glib and disrespectful, while more mainstream viewers could be amused but not that interested.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Reasonably intelligent, well-crafted and dramatically understated.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Misses its comic targets as often as it hits them but is endearing all the same for the good-natured cheer with which it skewers the eminently skewerable.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    An immediately involving yarn of an ace Marine sharpshooter set up to take the fall for an attempted presidential assassination, picture saddles itself with stereotypical villains, hokey contrivances and too-expedient crisis solutions.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    007 is undone by villainous scripting and misguided casting and acting in a couple of key secondary roles.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    While rambunctious and passably humorous, this offspring isn't nearly as imaginative and nimble-minded as the forerunner that spawned it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Sheer energy and audience allure to burn, even if numerous speed bumps cause many of the comic possibilities to go tumbling overboard.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Holes will no doubt speak clearly and appealingly to its intended early teen audience.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    It's a film of myriad minor pleasures but scant compelling qualities.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Crucially, the teaming of standup favorite and "Martin" star Lawrence and "Fresh Prince" Smith clicks from the outset, with both right at home handling action and comedy on the bigscreen. Even when it's not particularly funny, their interplay is engaging, and their lively, raucous personalities keep the proceedings punchy and watchable for the slightly overlong running time.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    So determinedly old-fashioned it makes a strong claim to being the best film musical of 1959.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Undeniably fascinating as a visit to a world you'd never have wanted to have come near in real life -- that of the Hussein family's inner sanctum -- the film falls crucially short by not providing a window into the mind of the man who was coerced into acting as his double.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    More intriguing on paper than when it actually unspools onscreen. Kevin Willmott's small-scaled but ambitious picture is well-researched, sometimes amusing and not unintelligent.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    This is a dish that has been prepared over a low heat for a long time, which makes for some pretty slow-going early on.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    This decorous look at the great man's five years as ambassador to France in the period leading up to the French Revolution touches upon much significant history, incident and emotion but, ironically, lacks the intrigue and drama of great fiction.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A live-wire performance by Benicio Del Toro sparks an otherwise morose study of loss, addiction and catharsis.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Although the story dynamics are fundamentally silly and the family stuff, with its parallel father-daughter melodrama, is elemental button-pushing, a good cast led by a winning Paul Rudd puts the nonsense over in reasonably disarming fashion.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A potentially provocative idea is played out to diminishing returns.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A sporadically funny romantic comedy with all the dramatic plausibility and tonal consistency of a TV variety show.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Rodrigo Garcia's film only intermittently surmounts the limitations of the central character's parched emotional existence and restricted horizons, and the resolutions to some principal dramatic lines seem rather too easy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Feels too piecemeal and ultimately inconsequential.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A psychotic seizure of a performance by Christian Bale dominates Harsh Times, the directorial debut of David Ayer that channels "Taxi Driver."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Largely set in two of the least appetizing locations imaginable, a concentration camp and an insane asylum, this is a rigorously made film that does almost nothing to invite the viewer into its world.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    This perky, episodic film is as broad and obvious as it could be, but delivers on its own terms thanks to sparky chemistry between its sunny blond stars, Owen Wilson and Jennifer Aniston, and the unabashed emotion-milking of the final reel.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Despite a sprinkling of laughs and eye-catching moments, this adaptation of a popular comicstrip reps a middling effort from the house that "Shrek" built, a rather narrowly conceived tale that makes only modest hay from the overworked conflict between wildlife and encroaching humans.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A fine group of comic performers manages to keep the screen worth looking at despite the obsessively one-note nature of this curious matchup between MTV Films and producer Scott Rudin.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    The few who saw the embalmed adaptation of "Snow Falling on Cedars" will recognize the same stifling approach brought to this more accessible material by director Scott Hicks.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A melodramatic step backward for writer-director Victor Nunez after his last two pictures, the first-rate "Ruby in Paradise" and "Ulee's Gold."
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    A disappointingly pedestrian prison meller that falls between stools artistically and politically.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Although decked out with a legitimate star and handsome production carpentry, pic takes no greater interest in creating three-dimensional characters or fleshing out a credible storyline than does the run-of-the-mill straight-to-video thriller.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Still, there is an estimable integrity to the respect and fidelity with which the film regards its subjects, as well as an honesty in its attempt to illuminate the essences of these difficult people.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    An unabashedly old-fashioned entertainment loaded with traditional dancing and music.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    An exhaustingly elaborate romantic fantasy actioner.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Amusing and engaging yet lacking in snap and cohesion, this insider's look at the world of standup comics in contempo Los Angeles rings true in its view of the variously warped, stunted and narrow lives of its mostly male denizens.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Strikes some resonant chords but also hits notes that simply don't ring true and are borderline risible at times
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Despite an effectively low-key performance by Billy Bob Thornton in the leading role, pic is no more spiritually insightful or illuminating than Sunday School instructional story, and a lot less dramatically coherent.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Made up of synthetics rather than whole cloth, this lurid concoction superficially gets by thanks to a strong cast and jazzy period detail, but its cartoonish contrivances fail to convince and lack any of the depth, feeling or atmosphere of genre stand-bearers like "L.A. Confidential."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Borderline dull to sit through, The Sixth Sense is actually rather interesting to think about afterward because of the revelation of its ending.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    There are certainly good laughs to be had. But the contrived script and bland direction prevent the film from ever developing a comic life of its own, leaving what fun there is seeming like the foundation to a rumpus room that's never finished.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Director Ron Howard and screenwriter Akiva Goldsman have conspired to drain any sense of fun out of the melodrama, leaving expectant audiences with an oppressively talky film that isn't exactly dull but comes as close to it as one could imagine with such provocative material.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Danny Boyle has great and plainly evident fun adding twists and curves and tunnels and endless style to his modern London noir Trance, but he makes so many left turns that the film turns in on itself rather than going anywhere.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    An excellent novel about the Iraq War and its homefront fallout has been turned into a rather flat and disappointing film in The Yellow Birds.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Despite its indie-flavored shooting style, first-rate visual effects, reasonable intensity factor, nihilistic attitude and post-9/11 anxiety overlay, this punchy sci-fier is, in the end, not much different from all the marauding creature features that have come before it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Harris' first directorial outing since his impressive and entirely different "Pollock" biopic bears echoes of many genre predecessors, especially Howard Hawks' "Rio Bravo" -- but echoes they remain.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Impressively rendered but oddly uninviting adventure.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The film represents the director in a more pensive, even philosophical vein, less interested in propulsive cinema and more reflective about what would seem to mean the most to him—dreams, and the ability to make them come true. This is what The BFG is about but, unfortunately, that is basically all it’s about and by a considerable measure too explicitly and single-mindedly so.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A protracted parade of woefully familiar motifs from the Amerindie playbook, Happy Endings comes off like an undernourished Paul Thomas Anderson wannabe.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Columbus' approach is intended to cloak such topics as mortality and human identity in the warm glow of greeting card sentiment, which renders the prescription palatable for mass consumption but hopelessly diluted.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Desperately uncertain in tone and able to generate only sporadic laughs, pic decks out its meager story of revenge and comeuppance with a vulgar, flashy shimmer that will no doubt attract teenage girls, or the core "Clueless" audience.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A compelling and little-known story of the Civil War period is studiously reduced to a dry and cautious history lesson in Free State of Jones.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Like many action stars, Statham is good at cool brooding, but West's frantic style works against this.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The season's first comet-targets-Earth special effects extravaganza is spectacular enough in its cataclysmic scenes of the planet being devastated by an unstoppable fireball, but proves far from thrilling in the down time spent with a largely dull assortment of troubled human beings.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    This first dramatic feature by "Hoop Dreams" director Steve James has one foot still squarely planted in the docu aesthetic and notably lacks any psychological interest or emotional depth.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A nice looking but heavily formulaic DreamWorks animation entry.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Surprisingly lacks a feeling of personal urgency and insight that would have made it a distinctive, even unique contribution to the considerable number of films that deal with the war in general and Holocaust in particular.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Nothing about the project's execution inspires the feeling that this was ever intended as anything more than a lark, which would be fine if it were a good one. As it is, audience teeth-grinding sets in early and never lets up.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Beautifully crafted and highlighted by an arresting change-of-pace perf by Meg Ryan as an English teacher erotically awakened by a homicide detective. But the story's unpalatable narrative holes and dramatic missteps will hold sway over the pic's better qualities.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A low-impact romantic comedy-drama from James L. Brooks in which the central characters are strangely disconnected from one another as well as from the audience.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Entombs its characters so thoroughly in a prison of palpably predestined tragedy that one knows from the outset that the very worst that can happen most certainly will.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The Bronze is a strident comedy made in accordance with the sole guiding principle of, when in doubt, go even more vulgar.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    In trying to merge this alarmist theme with an old-fashioned murder mystery, the filmmakers throw at least one plot-twist sucker-punch too many, leaving the viewer with an “Oh, come on” reaction to the entire film.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Simultaneously contrived and genuinely felt.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Has absolutely nothing to say about its characters and their lamentable actions.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    If the story is meant to represent a microcosm of the immigration problem, it’s woefully reductive. If it’s meant to be first and foremost an action thriller, it does have a few nice moves to offer.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The demoralizing slide of the relationship between Francois Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard, from artistic comrades-in-arms during the thrilling creation of the nouvelle vague to name-calling enemies from the early '70s onward, is charted in overly academic and constricted fashion in Two in the Wave.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    This quite mediocre spawned-from-television feature feels like a Jesus film designed primarily for true believers, meaning that the faith-based public that has already been put on alert by seal-of-approval-dispensing church leaders that this is a film to see will make the Fox release into a significant Heartland attraction.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    What they have done is taken a few second-hand ideas from noir and speculative fiction and mixed them in occasionally striking ways, even if, in the end, the result isn't all that much fun.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Something less than monumental, The Monuments Men wears its noble purpose on its sleeve when either greater grit or more irreverence could have put the same tale across to modern audiences with more punch and no loss of import.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    An attempt to merge a semi-jokey buddy movie with a more realistic account of cops' messy private lives, Hollywood Homicide falls short on both counts.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    As much a trifle as its title suggests, My Blueberry Nights sees Hong Kong stylist Wong Kar Wai applying his characteristic visual and thematic doodles to a wispy story of lovelorn Yanks.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    That the film mostly falls flat has far more to do with the largely unconvincing material rather than with the co-stars, who are more than game for often clownish shenanigans Black and his co-writer Anthony Bagarozzi have concocted for them; in fit and starts, the actors display a buoyant comic rapport.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    It all ends up being a half-hour too much of a just okay thing.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    For all its clever design, beguiling creatures and witty actors, the picture feels far more conventional than it should; it's a Disney film illustrated by Burton, rather than a Burton film that happens to be released by Disney.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    In a role that Tom Hanks might have played a decade or so ago, Perry is pretty bland and doesn't provide any hints as to why Alex is so emotionally stymied.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Pfeiffer tackles the part with obvious dedication, but she's thwarted from the get-go by the heavily proscribed nature of the role as written.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Shortchanging traditional animation by literalizing it while robbing actors of their full range of facial expressiveness, the performance-capture technique favored by director Robert Zemeckis looks more than ever like the emperor's new clothes in Disney's A Christmas Carol.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The souffle falls a little flat in The Ladykillers, a Coen brothers black comedy in which the humor seems arch and narrative momentum doesn't kick in until the final third.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A woefully predictable imperiled-yuppie-family-under-siege suspenser that hardly seems worth the attention of its relatively high-profile participants.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Feels slight and pretty ordinary by the end, with no edge or compelling insights, just a reasonable feel for teen attitudes and banter.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A partly smart, mostly dumb addition to the teen horror sweepstakes -- smart in how it neatly catches the petty, hurtful, sexy and druggy aspects of high school life, dumb in how it makes absolutely no sense once its resolution is known.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Half-intriguing, half-tedious.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Director David Gordon Green has created some fresh, penetrating, beautifully drawn scenes of one-on-one intimacy…But some of what surrounds these interludes is variously misguided, fuzzy and borderline pretentious.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Well-wrought individual scenes and sharply focused acting provide Rebecca Miller's third feature with a measure of gravity, but too much abrupt, even melodramatic behavior and undigested psychological matter leave nagging dissatisfactions.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A sort of maritime Donner Party, In the Heart of the Sea is a rugged but underwhelming true-life drama of a cursed 19th century whaling voyage.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Feels like a film that should have been made at least 25 years ago. Or made as a period piece. Heavy, doom-laden and, unfortunately, entirely predictable.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The Client is a satisfactory, by-the-numbers child-in-jeopardy thriller that will fill the bill as a very commercial hot weather popcorn picture.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Nowhere to be found is any dramatic surprise, heightening of the pulse or genuine pulling of heartstrings. Gary Winick's direction consists of button pushing, and the mechanics are palpable at every step.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Even with the addition of new characters, such as the ones voiced by Brad Pitt and Matt Damon, George Miller's animated sequel just isn't very funny.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Despite its undeniably pure and earnest intent, Solaris is equally undeniably an arid, dull affair that imposes and maintains a huge distance between the viewer and what happens onscreen.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Although the humor helps, the Groundhog Day-like repetition gets tedious; it makes you feel more like a hamster than a groundhog — or rather a hamster's wheel, going round and round, over and over again.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The gaps between the hipster comedy of the star, the incipient sentimentality of the story and the gravely depressing reality of the setting provide tonal abysses simply too vast to bridge in Rock the Kasbah, an intermittently amusing but dramatically problematic mish-mash that careens all over a rough and rocky road.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Compared with high-powered action specialists like James Cameron, director Charles Russell seems content to accomplish just one thing per shot, getting the essentials on the screen but creating no special dynamic or look.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    There is a sense of bloat and where-do-we-go-from here aimlessness to this unconscionably protracted undertaking.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Nicely cast and made with as much conviction as can be brought to something so intrinsically formulaic.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The film is offbeat, silly, disarming and loopy all at the same time, and viewers will decide to ride with that or just give up on it, according to mood and disposition.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    More than even the most faithful of the earlier episodes, this film feels devoted above all to reproducing the novel onscreen as closely as possible, an impulse that drags it toward ponderousness at times and rather sorely tests the abilities of the young actors to hold the screen entirely on their own, without being propped up by the ever-fabulous array of character actors the series offers.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Anthony and Joe Russo place too much faith in the ability of their talented thesps to carry the day over precariously thin material.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Although arresting in spots, it falls far short of bringing out the full values of the play, and doesn't approach the emotional resonance of Franco Zeffirelli's immensely popular 1968 screen version.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    For those always on the lookout for the "funny" Allen, this one definitely has its moments, but too much of the picture is flat, dispiriting and frankly unbelievable in fundamental ways that defy the granting of poetic license.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Routine, superficial manhunt stuff.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A creakily old-fashioned comedy that forgot to pack the laughs along with the nudging and kvetching.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    When Coppola finds creative nirvana, he frequently has trouble delivering the full goods. Tetro represents something of a middle ground in that respect.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates rates medium on the grossness scale (an all-body, pre-marital naked-Indian-guru-administered massage for the bride with a happy ending, anyone?), and pretty high in crude talk. But it's kind of a dud when it comes to endurance and imaginative moves.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A moderately amusing but very uneven revisionist adventure with franchise and theme park intentions written all over it...This attempt by Verbinski and producer Jerry Bruckheimer to plant the flag for another Pirates of the Caribbean-scaled series tries to have it too many ways tonally, resulting in a work that wobbles and thrashes all over the place as it attempts to find the right groove.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Comes across in muted fashion, with uninvolving characters and lack of genuine excitement or fright creating a second-rate, second-hand feel.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Pfister, who, like his mentor Nolan, adamantly continues to shoot on film (not digital), shows a sure hand at staging scenes, creating visuals and setting a tone -- if only all the diverse elements here fit comfortably under the same tent.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Malick's exalted visuals and isolated metaphysical epiphanies are ill-supported by a muddled, lurching narrative, resulting in a sprawling, unfocused account of an epochal historical moment.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Individual scenes in actor Justin Theroux's directorial debut possess a certain flair, but the central issue on which the story turns -- how obnoxious and mean-spirited can you be and still get someone to love you? -- presents a forbidding obstacle.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Mismatched marriage of offbeat character study and unimaginative horror riffs. Most compelling element by far is Bruce Campbell's inspired performance as a nursing home patient who insists he is the real Elvis Presley.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Sports some tasty scenes, mostly in the first half, but also pushes 007 into CGI-driven, quasi-sci-fi territory that feels like a betrayal of what the franchise has always been about.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The sensitive macho Schoenaerts is pretty much center-screen throughout this sleekly made suspense piece based on a script more loaded with holes than the numerous bad guys he either shoots or stabs to death.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A pale reworking of its predecessor.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Like his previous efforts, Jarmusch's sidelong take on Western conventions relies upon quirky tone, hipsterish performances and a highly refined visual style to put it over.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    If you’re going to attempt a quasi-farcical look at the behavior of thirtysomething strivers in Hollywood, you need to cut more sharply and dig more deeply than does L.A. Times.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    This franchise-hungry champion of the underdog brings no sense of fun to his pursuit of bad guys; it's just the fate he's stuck with.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    As an exercise in style, it's diverting enough, but these mean streets are so well traveled that it takes someone like Eva Green to make the detour through them worth the trip.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The Basketball Diaries is a weak-tea rendition of Jim Carroll's much-admired cult tome about his teenage drug addiction. Leonardo DiCaprio's committed lead performance deserves a better context than this gloss on the source material.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The Rum Diary remains a relatively mild diversion, not at all unpleasant but neither compelling nor convulsive.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    On their own, individual scenes are effective enough in semi-farcically portraying the ignorance, avoidance and/or downright denial by the practitioners of bad loans. Together, however, they are wearying in their repetitive nature.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A junior-league "Superbad" with an aftertaste of "The Pacifier," Drillbit Taylor is a just passable pubescent comedy with a modest laugh count by Apatow factory standards.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Penn's magnetism and hesitant line delivery create what interest there is, although the whole picture suffers from a central figure who can never get it together on any level.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Once you realize the film is just going to be a string of encomiums against a backdrop of frantically edited archival material in which few shots are allowed to stay onscreen longer than three seconds, it's clear that no meaningful analysis of the woman's career or political agenda will be forthcoming.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    With Melissa McCarthy playing a one-woman demolition team who, for 95 percent of the running time, is a genuine affront to nature, there are unavoidably some laughs here, although the gifted comic actor got more of them in less screen time in her previous films than she does in this starring role.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Visually, the film is without flair or ambition, conveying no sense of atmosphere or mood. But the performances put it over.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Earnest and well-intentioned.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A superficially diverting but substance-free concoction, a would-be thriller as evanescent as a magic trick and one that develops no suspense or rooting interest because the characters possess all the substance of invisible ink.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Dazzlingly designed and staged in a theatrical setting so as to suggest that the characters are enacting assigned roles in life, this tight and pacy telling of a 900 page-plus novel touches a number of its important bases but lacks emotional depth, moral resonance and the simple ability to allow its rich characters to experience and drink deeply of life.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The imaginatively illustrated but precariously precious film offers up a string of minor pleasures but never becomes more than moderately amusing or involving.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Lacks the special creative spark needed to lift it to an uncommon imaginative level.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    An attractively designed but narratively challenged, one-note film.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Laura Linney’s beautiful performance is most of the story in p.s.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The picture serves up intermittent pleasures but is too raggedy and laid-back for its own good, its images evaporating nearly as soon as they hit the screen.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    What might have been an effective fantasy if handled with sophistication and insouciance is instead weighed down by ponderous pacing, overstuffed production values and an instance of miscasting.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    An intriguingly plotted mystery that unfortunately forgets to put the noir in film noir. A drab, pale-looking affair without a trace of visual style, this cross-country pursuit yarn fights a losing battle to sustain viewer attention via narrative alone, so much does it flounder for lack of imagistic flair.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A game and winning performance by Melinda Page Hamilton is the only saving grace.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Shows the sort of edge in places that will be appreciated by horror fanboys of all ages, but is mostly too overwrought and over-the-top.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Aside from spasms of brutal violence, however, there's nothing rousing or new here.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The Pact demonstrates both why people respond to horror and why it's so routinely scorned.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    At best an honorable failure, an intelligent and ambitious picture that crucially lacks dramatic flair and emotional involvement.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Predictable, cutesy and nowhere near hot-blooded enough.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    As easy on the eyes and ears as it is embalmed from any dramatic point of view.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Despite her (Judd's) efforts and those of a generally talented cast, picture just pokes along and offers nothing out of the ordinary in terms of drama, characterization or insight. Judd's presence notwithstanding, this one would be more at home on small than on big screens.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Jig
    The film's inability to illuminate the finer points of the rigid form, to define what separates the great from the good, proves frustrating for the outsider.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Intermittently engaging but dramatically slack, this tale...is more interesting around the edges than it is at its core, thanks to the dull nature of the lead character played by Matt Damon.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Whit Stillman's stiff directorial approach ill suits the sensual ambiance of the club scene so intently depicted, and the mostly self-conscious, uptight characters seem to have made a left turn out of "Metropolitan" and walked through the wrong door to turn up in this flamboyant druggie scene.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    While After the Sunset is never exactly dull and is smartly cut to a brief running time, it never quickens the pulse.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    More evident than ever the film is inherently a deeply flawed work that was far from fully realized in both script and shooting.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A study of the urban dope-dealing culture and its toll on everyone who comes in contact with it, the picture has an insider's feel that is constantly undercut by the filmmaker's impulse to editorialize.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Director Christine Jeffs, who previously helmed "Rain" and "Sylvia," tries to strike a balance between the yarn's dark currents and offbeat comedy, but the result is often uneasy, with the humor receding as things progress.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Sexual suspicion and game-playing spiral down from the exotically intriguing to outright silliness in Chloe.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Lives up to its name by serving up a fraction of what audiences are used to getting in this department from PixarPixar and DreamWorks -- little originality, little humor and little ingratiating characterization.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A credibly drawn central character is trapped inside a half-cooked dramatic stew in Hello I Must Be Going.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The major jolt is saved for the very end but, like much else in the film, it is overexplained and underlined when more simplicity and quiet would have provided the revelation with the power of a depth charge.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A humdrum straight line of a film, Monsters University never surprises, goes off in unexpected directions or throws you for a loop in the manner of the best Pixar stories. Nor does it come close to elating through the sheer imagination of its conceits and storytelling.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Unfortunately, Mockingjay — Part 1 has all the personality of an industrial film. There's not a drop of insolence, insubordination or insurrection running through its veins; it feels like a manufactured product through and through, ironic and sad given its revolutionary theme.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Despite numerous surface pleasures, including a beguiling pop soundtrack and presence of rising star Cillian Murphy in the lead role, dramatic shortcomings spell a mixed overall reception.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    As a young lady who can't say no to a beautiful dress or accessory, Isla Fisher is not to be denied, and her irrepressible comic personality overcomes a number of the film's impediments.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    It's got a few things going for it and it's not unenjoyable to sit through, but, at the same time, the tone and creative register never feel confident and settled. It's not bad but not quite good enough either.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A Judd Apatow clone that's one of the few recent R-rated raunch fests the ubiquitous auteur of larky crudeness actually had nothing to do with, I Love You, Man cranks out the kind of lowball humor that makes you gag on your own laughs.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Unfortunately, as a director, Foster shows no knack or instinct for building tension; her style is strictly presentational, brisk and efficient, but with no sly trickery, desire to surprise or to forge technique that suggests an imaginative approach to storytelling.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Although involving, this remake of a recent French film never reaches the anticipated heights of excitement and suspense.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    There's something about novelist Stephenie Meyer that induces formerly interesting directors to suddenly make films that are slow, silly and soporific.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    While the surfaces, backgrounds and sense of constant motion are authentic to their tinselly cores, what goes on among the fictional participants resembles gag-reliant improv routines that haven’t been entirely worked out.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The older the actors here the better they are, as pros like Paul Giamatti and Damian Lewis have it all over low-voltage young leads Douglas Booth and Hailee Steinfeld. Relativity will be lucky to milk anything more than a moderate take from this pretty but unexciting enactment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Moderately inspiring in the way such true-life stories of "the indomitable human spirit" are always constructed to be.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Director Sturla Gunnarsson seems aware of the savagery intrinsic to the story, but is unable to mine it deeply, proving too genteel in the end to make a genuinely creepy or disturbing film.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The feel of a direct-to-video title that's been upgraded to theatrical status in the hopes of wringing a few extra bucks out of it and improving its not-too-distant homevid marketability.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A broad and obvious approach to ambiguous material that's virtually all plot mechanics with little nuance or characterization.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Takes itself so seriously that it never has fun with its shopworn genre elements.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Goes down like stiff medicine, leaving one feeling exhausted relief when it's finally over.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Valerie Breiman’s exceedingly slick feature is one of those cutesy items in which the characters talk about nothing but relationships and themselves.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Taymor makes the action clear and easy to follow with her bold physicalization of the story and forceful direction of an astutely chosen cast.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    As impressive as the industrial-style special effects may be, they're both too much and not enough for this mild mild West.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    There is amusement to be had, engaging actors to admire and beautiful craftsmanship to behold, but the entertainment quotient is below their usual standard when it comes to the films they target for a mass audience, of which this is one.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Falls somewhere in between standing on its own feet as a real movie worth the price of a ticket and merely being a glorified TV episode refitted for theaters.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Some mordant comic touches would have been welcome throughout the picture, which has a somber tone that suffers a bit from lack of modulation and nuance.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    River of Grass works much better as a jokey , theoretical piece of genre revisionism than as a real movie.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Created as a comic vehicle for the lead actor, pic depends entirely too much on Wayans to carry the day, but at this point he is far more eager and willing than he is funny.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Like a light buffet of tasty morsels rather than a full and satisfying meal; all the episodes are more or less agreeable, but as a whole it lacks a knockout punch, one dynamite sequence that will galvanize viewers.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    By underplaying the melodrama in the presumed hope of seeming subtle when Kelley Sane’s script is so baldly melodramatic, the “Tsotsi” helmer drains the life out of an obviously explosive subject.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Individual scenes are charged with energy, tense confrontations are numerous, and Hillcoat and Cook's intentions were undoubtedly partly to tease and taunt viewers with uncertainly about where they, and the characters, stand, to figure out who's got the power and who doesn't. If it was possible to give a damn about any of them, it would help.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    This isn't the Star Wars we've always known and at least sometimes loved.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Stylistically audacious in the way it employs six different actors and assorted visual styles to depict various aspects of the troubadour's life and career, the film nevertheless lacks a narrative and a center, much like the "ghost" at its core.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Oddly, too, the film is somewhat shortchanged by its great star, Johnny Depp, who disappointingly has chosen to play Dillinger as self-consciously cool rather than earthy and gregarious.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Writers and directors Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland have crafted a solid script... Holding the enterprise back, however, is a terribly restrained directorial approach and academic visual style that prevent the lubricious story from truly coming to life.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Unfortunately, the operative word is bland, as the newcomers don't add much to the formula, leaving it to their nemeses to enliven the proceedings. Narrative drive and humor are also in short supply, which creates a serious sagsag in the middle when the novelty of the fresh components has mostly worn off.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The dark and sometimes funny The D Train is a feel-bad comedy, in that one feels bad for what happens to every character in the film and bad for sometimes being taken to places that feel more implausible than just transgressive.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Has moments of power and imagination, but the overworked style and heavy socially conscious bent exude an off-putting sense of self-importance, making for a picture that's more of a chore than a pleasure to sit through.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The repetitive storyline about successive heists during a Muppets European tour grows tiresome and the fun is intermittent.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The film is ice cold, never finding a way to invite the viewer into the story, and Richard Gere doesn't convince as a Jewish biblical scholar.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Eccentric, misguided and occasionally charming and sweet, this curiosity item with Sean Penn in one of his nuttier performances is unlikely to be embraced critically or commercially.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    From one moment to the next, it's possible to on some level enjoy the shaking up of tired conventions in a swordplay fantasy such as this and then to be dismayed by the lowbrow vulgarity of what's ended up onscreen. The film gives with one hand and takes away with the other, which can be frustrating in what's meant to be an entertainment.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    It is nonetheless imaginative in a highly familiar and ultimately tedious way.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Unfortunately, story's tension climaxes a half-hour before the film is over, and thereafter dissipates much of the charge and good will generated up to that point.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Amiable but no more, Bee Movie puts a hiveful of potent talent at the service of a zig-zigging, back-of-an-envelope story that's short on surprise and originality.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Stephen Daldry's film is sensitively realized and dramatically absorbing, but comes across as an essentially cerebral experience without gut impact.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Such heart-tuggers have their appeal to some people in any era, but earnest hokum of this nature has become increasingly rare. And for a reason.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Other than for the pleasure of watching Green try to conquer ancient Greece dressed as a distant forebearer of Catwoman, more is less and a little late in this long-aborning sequel.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Notable for Kimberly Elise's ferocious lead performance and for the bigscreen exposure pic affords the charismatic Bishop T.D. Jakes, who plays himself and upon whose works the film is based.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    As gooey and lacking in protein as a chocolate holiday bonbon, Valentine's Day plays like a feature-length commercial produced by the Friends of the Valentine Promotional Society.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The gradual dilution of fresh humor is further undercut by a queasy sense that the picture, in the end, is quietly endorsing all the psychoanalytical mumbo jumbo that it has been poking fun at all along.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A lightweight, modestly engaging yarn sporting reductive mystical and philosophical elements that are both valid and borderline silly.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    This handsome, not unappealing look at a Scottish legend of nearly 300 years ago is too solemn, wooden and dour for its own good, and feels oddly of another era.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A strange international odyssey that becomes more complicated and loony by the moment. Some viewers will undoubtedly tune out early, others will follow as far as they can -- and a privileged few might make it all the way.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The slapstick and action comedy interludes are haphazardly executed at best, and matters aren't helped by the film's incredibly ugly look.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Memories of dreary Sunday school classes come flooding back courtesy of The Nativity Story.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    What starts as potentially interesting apocalyptic speculative fiction devolves into dreary sub-Hunger Games survivalism and banal teen romance.

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