Trevor Johnston
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For 54 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Trevor Johnston's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Upstream Color
Lowest review score: 20 A Fantastic Fear of Everything
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 15 out of 54
  2. Negative: 4 out of 54
54 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Trevor Johnston
    It’s all unexpectedly uninvolving.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Trevor Johnston
    There’s much over-egged mugging from the grown-ups (bumbling toff Richard Griffiths, shouty sarge John Lynch), but the lads are spot-on: young Mackay is effectively touching and bristling O’Connell hints at Next Big Thing charisma.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Trevor Johnston
    There’s enough sly wit in the margins to engage the grown-ups and the whole thing conveys Christmas cheer without being overly cynical.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Trevor Johnston
    Vikander’s spellbinding, not-quite-human presence (her synthetic skin is silky yet creepy) keeps us watching. But an only-too-obvious ‘twist’ and some clunky plotting...drain much of the credibility from a story which promised so much.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    A way-too-leisurely thriller whose destination is fairly obvious from early on, but to which the talented cast apply themselves with effortful seriousness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    Complications escalate to a tiresome degree, leeching the fun from the movie, which is slung together with cold competence (and not much more) by jobbing Icelandic maverick Baltasar Kormákur.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    Instead of developing the story’s wartime context, Trueba and veteran screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière offer passing reflections on the relationship between observation and the largely mental process of creativity, but little that ignites genuine drama.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    Yet just when the movie has us in its grasp, the script falls to pieces and turns into a crass female-in-peril button-pusher whose shameless psycho-killer clichés insult the intelligence.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    Sadly, much as we want to relish the shameless parade of cartoon violence, while indulging the equally shameless cavalcade of adolescent sexism, the soggy plotting and slack comic timing are downers.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    This anime feature takes an intriguing premise and does little with it. The detailed Ghibli-esque visuals are decent enough, but this is disappointingly bland.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    Chases on foot and four wheels keep the thing moving, but apart from a thematic wrinkle where Besson’s clearly siding with the hood rather than the lawmakers, it’s all pretty predictable.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    This homegrown romcom is pretty much doomed from the start.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    Refreshingly, Mariachi Gringo looks beyond the usual cartel/corruption/bloodbath take on modern Mexico, but the result is altogether stronger on sincerity than emotional engagement.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    Another convoluted tale of criminal bumbling.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    From Visconti and Pasolini through to I Am Love, Italian cinema has a proud tradition of dramatising class tensions, but this feels more like a TV soap lost on the big screen. The dividends are disappointing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    Curry’s film hints at the role of media images in determining such self-conscious behaviour on the world’s frontlines, yet misses an opportunity to take VanDyke to task.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 20 Trevor Johnston
    Putting the ‘retch’ into ‘wretched’, this wedding comedy makes the fatal assumption that the sight of acting icons of a certain age – Robert De Niro, Susan Sarandon and Diane Keaton – behaving badly will have us rolling in the aisles.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 Trevor Johnston
    There’s not a single, solitary laugh to be had.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Trevor Johnston
    Pettyfer and Wilde (both Brits) look the part in a soft-drinks-commercial way, but their characters might as well be called Ken and Barbie for all the depth they bring to this wish-fulfilment fantasy of social mobility.

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