For 41 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Trevor Johnston's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Upstream Color
Lowest review score: 20 The Big Wedding
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 41
  2. Negative: 4 out of 41
41 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Trevor Johnston
    If you’ve ever sat at your desk wondering whether there’s more to life, or been kept awake by an insidious hum in the darkness, this will speak to your soul – even as its enveloping, disturbing, uplifting story sends your mind reeling with giddy possibilities.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Trevor Johnston
    The cliché-averse will doubtless resist, but the laughter and tears here are never less than fully earned. A lovely film.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Trevor Johnston
    While Monsters University can’t claim outright originality, this is a far richer movie than most were expecting.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Trevor Johnston
    Events are still unfolding, so this is a snapshot in time, but Gibney’s conscientious, revealing document proves a mine of valuable information and affecting emotional insights.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Trevor Johnston
    Its encouragement to let ourselves be captivated by everyday humanity as well as the old masters is both richly illuminating and quirkily endearing. Time well spent.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Trevor Johnston
    Don’t be put off by the jock-ish ‘extreme sports’ subject matter, this is an insightful, deeply affecting journey of emotional discovery beyond the thrill of speed and the roar of the crowd.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Trevor Johnston
    Occasionally baggy, always sincere, this is an essential document of a defining era when ‘soul’ really meant something.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Trevor Johnston
    Even after The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty, this brings us chillingly closer to the real story of the post-Iraq shitstorm.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Trevor Johnston
    The effect is talismanic: overlaid by a thoughtful voiceover, it invites the audience to share the pain in a cathartic act of imaginative reclamation.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Trevor Johnston
    The material inspires affection, given its knowing pastiche of everything from Universal horrors to '50s grade-Z sci-fi, and a shamelessly hedonistic, fiercely independent sensibility that must have seemed a welcome relief from the mainstream bombast of other '70s musicals.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Trevor Johnston
    There’s much to ponder in a brave, defiantly idiosyncratic film that’s as mesmerising as it is unexpected.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Trevor Johnston
    As a study in human greed this is shocking, but as this thorough, convincing, if slightly stodgy film makes clear, it’s also a moment to mobilise public opinion and shape change.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Trevor Johnston
    It’s all done with care and authentic Japanese locations, and is engrossing for anyone with an interest in the subject. But there’s scant drama as proceedings plod their way towards mutual understanding.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Trevor Johnston
    Child’s Pose plays its thematic cards far too early, but it’s sustained by Gheorghiu’s compelling central turn as the endlessly self-deluding grande dame.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Trevor Johnston
    Seidl gestures towards understanding rather than confrontation – turning in a slighter, softer-grained film than its predecessors, but no worse for it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Trevor Johnston
    The result isn’t as powerful as it should be. But it’s still cheering to see a film whose moral journey has little to do with the usual Hollywood chestnut of white middle-class consciousness-raising.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Trevor Johnston
    It’s all rather charming, though, since leading man Schilling remains affable while never underselling this kindly yet feckless dropout’s sheer spinelessness.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Trevor Johnston
    Not exactly arthouse, but as subtitled fluff goes, we’re talking première classe.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Trevor Johnston
    This story of humanity manifesting itself in unexpected circumstances just doesn’t have enough surprises on offer to make good on that early promise. A noteworthy debut nonetheless.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Trevor Johnston
    Pioneer delivers insidious, shadowy tension, while it’s genuinely surprising to find yourself so engrossed – story glitches notwithstanding – in key issues like compression sickness and divers’ gas supply.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Trevor Johnston
    Half of a Yellow Sun bravely takes on too broad a canvas with too narrow a budget, but it’s a relevant saga that’s worth telling.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Trevor Johnston
    The film never works out how to generate genuine dramatic fire from its material. There are convincing performances and decorative retro detail to admire, but the heart needs to beat just that bit faster – and it doesn’t manage that.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    A way-too-leisurely thriller whose destination is fairly obvious from early on, but to which the talented cast apply themselves with effortful seriousness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    Complications escalate to a tiresome degree, leeching the fun from the movie, which is slung together with cold competence (and not much more) by jobbing Icelandic maverick Baltasar Kormákur.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    Instead of developing the story’s wartime context, Trueba and veteran screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière offer passing reflections on the relationship between observation and the largely mental process of creativity, but little that ignites genuine drama.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    Yet just when the movie has us in its grasp, the script falls to pieces and turns into a crass female-in-peril button-pusher whose shameless psycho-killer clichés insult the intelligence.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    Sadly, much as we want to relish the shameless parade of cartoon violence, while indulging the equally shameless cavalcade of adolescent sexism, the soggy plotting and slack comic timing are downers.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    This anime feature takes an intriguing premise and does little with it. The detailed Ghibli-esque visuals are decent enough, but this is disappointingly bland.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    Chases on foot and four wheels keep the thing moving, but apart from a thematic wrinkle where Besson’s clearly siding with the hood rather than the lawmakers, it’s all pretty predictable.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    This homegrown romcom is pretty much doomed from the start.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Trevor Johnston
    Refreshingly, Mariachi Gringo looks beyond the usual cartel/corruption/bloodbath take on modern Mexico, but the result is altogether stronger on sincerity than emotional engagement.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 20 Trevor Johnston
    Putting the ‘retch’ into ‘wretched’, this wedding comedy makes the fatal assumption that the sight of acting icons of a certain age – Robert De Niro, Susan Sarandon and Diane Keaton – behaving badly will have us rolling in the aisles.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 Trevor Johnston
    There’s not a single, solitary laugh to be had.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Trevor Johnston
    Pettyfer and Wilde (both Brits) look the part in a soft-drinks-commercial way, but their characters might as well be called Ken and Barbie for all the depth they bring to this wish-fulfilment fantasy of social mobility.