For 1,994 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ty Burr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Moolaadé
Lowest review score: 0 Bratz
Score distribution:
1,994 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Terrifically compelling and, more than that, unexpectedly moving.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The Perks of Being a Wallflower finds an unexpectedly moving freshness in the old clichés by remaining attentive to the nuances of what happens within and between unhappy teenagers.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    A haunting experience, one that requires patience (and then some) but that offers spiritual, philosophical, and aesthetic rewards beyond the immediate power of words to describe.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Haneke has become known as a dour modern master of cinematic pain, and in this movie he scrubs civilization down to the root level.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Seems calculated to shock, but what’s most disquieting about Nymph()maniac is how funny, tender, thoughtful, and truthful it is, even as it pushes into genuinely seamy aspects of onscreen sexuality. Obnoxious he may be, but von Trier knows how to burrow into our ids.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Gosling may be the soul of Half Nelson, but Epps is the film's heart.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The question remains: Why would Herzog want to dramatize what he has already captured as nonfiction? To better control the material, I think, and to bring it in line with his own obsessions.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The movie’s tone is hushed, restrained; emotional damage is crammed way back where no one can see it yet defines everything through a murky prism.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The film is at its most quietly powerful, though, when telling the story of a group of African-American high school kids who took their discontent to the highest court in the land.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The subject is the privileged state of childhood itself - how we're all lucky to have had it and how it so easily floats away from our grasp.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    That smart, hip, human comedy you've been waiting for all year.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The Lunchbox isn’t an example of bravura moviemaking or cutting-edge style but simply a tale told with intelligence, restraint, and respect.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Horror movie Rule #1: The only way to kill a zombie is to shoot it in the brain. George Romero himself laid this maxim down with his first film, the endlessly influential 1968 gutter classic "Night of the Living Dead." Forty years later, with George A. Romero's Diary of the Dead, the venerable filmmaker has done something almost as startling: He has put brains back into the zombie genre.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    A tremendous human drama, with each stage of its characters' journey a white-knuckle thriller in miniature.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    She’s a diva — she knows it, we know it, the director knows it — but over the years Stritch seems to have learned that the only way to deal with that is honestly. So she’s a paradox: a diva with no illusions about herself.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    There's a quiet metaphor here: How do you teach children without touching them - their minds, their souls, their sensitivities?
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    In Standard Operating Procedure, Errol Morris does something inconceivable and, at first glance, ill-advised. He gives the US soldiers of Abu Ghraib back their humanity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The real deal, an often awkward but nonetheless terrifically compelling high-stakes human drama.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Reprise is exceptionally smart about the crushing expectations brought to the table by those who love us.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The triumph of this fond, uncontainable documentary is that it lets you hear that voice again loud and clear.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The movie's strength is its refusal to offer easy answers.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Tarantino may have nicked the title first, but this is the real ''Pulp Fiction," with all the drama and the dead ends that implies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Rich Hill might fairly be called “Boyhood: The Documentary,” and, not surprisingly, it offers a reality harsher than — if just as compassionate as — Richard Linklater’s dreamy time-lapse drama.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Land Ho! is a hot spring of a movie: It fizzes a lot, and you come out feeling better than you went in.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The filmmakers are smart to cut between their primary interview and later footage of Junge watching that interview and offering further commentary -- living footnotes, as it were.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Does what too many independent American movies only pretend to do: Takes you to an unnoticed corner of our country and shows what it's like to actually live there.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Stories We Tell is one of those movies you watch on a screen and replay in your head for days, moving between its many levels of inquiry and touched, always, by Polley’s compassion toward her relatives in particular and people in general.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The new film is slender, and it plays obliquely with the style of the 20th-century Japanese master Yasujiro Ozu: simple shots of simple people revealing universal truths.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    One of the smarter, more unexpectedly touching documentaries of the year, and I recommend it to you whether you love Rivers or loathe the very thought of her.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    A hugely enjoyable shambles. It’s a comic deconstruction of that most useless of Hollywood artifacts — the blockbuster sequel — that refuses to take itself seriously on any level, which, face it, is just what we need as the summer boom-boom season shifts into high gear.

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