For 2,299 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ty Burr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Whiplash
Lowest review score: 0 Bratz
Score distribution:
2299 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    But it's Polanski who pries the genre open until it goes metaphysical.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The movie’s a funny, dark, increasingly razor-sharp inquiry into the metaphysics of modern fame — how the dream of “being seen” and thus validated on some primal level can completely unhinge the average schmo.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Birdman finds Iñárritu in the mood for play, and with a mighty cast that fields every pitch he throws.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The arrival of Raúl Ruiz’s final work, Night Across the Street, brings the total to four, an elegant, clear-eyed bridge game of artists playing their last trump cards.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    At Sundance, Whiplash quickly picked up the nickname “Full Metal Juilliard” on the basis of scenes in which Andrew, plucked from a late-night practice session to be the orchestra’s drummer, is raked over the coals by his new mentor. Horrifying as they are, these sequences are dazzling exercises in total humiliation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The result is one of the most unforgiving ground-level documentaries about the music business ever made -- the six-string equivalent of "Hoop Dreams."
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The Coens also understand the stark immediacy of this tale, and they visualize it with brilliantly judged details.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    In the pop high it delivers, this is the greatest prequel ever made.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    It's worth stressing how deeply pleasurable Moolaad is to watch.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Room unfolds with the privilege of seeing and experiencing the world for the very first time, which is maybe the best we can ever expect from a medium like the cinema.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    In nerve, guts, heart, and mind — one of the finest films of 2017.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    It's a movie made with the same coolly fanatical attention to craft the lead character displays in her work. Bigelow is now recognized as one of our true filmmaking naturals.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    It's the only film that exists of the Ghetto, and it's both revelatory and profoundly suspect.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    A heart-rending account of people trying to dodge the hurdles that politics puts in front of them. By the end of this humanist epic, some are ennobled by their struggle. Most are exhausted.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The sight is magical and heartbreaking in equal measure. Look, the movie says: Where so many would fall, a man walks on air.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    What's most shocking about The Passenger 30 years later? Seeing Jack Nicholson at the lean, sardonic height of his youthful powers? Finding a Michelangelo Antonioni movie with an actual plot?
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Longer on atmosphere and observation than on story, but you don't mind: Coppola maintains her quietly charged tone with a certainty that would be unbelievable in a second film if you didn't suspect genetics had a hand.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Once is the first rock musical that actually makes sense. People don't burst into song in this movie because the orchestra's swelling out of nowhere. The guy and the girl are working musicians -- or they'd like to be, if they could make a living at it -- and they're played by working musicians.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Ex Libris has no narration and it lasts three hours and 17 minutes, which sounds like torture (or, alternately, 3½ episodes of “Game of Thrones”). Somewhat surprisingly, the movie rushes by at the speed of life.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    This is a small, compassionate gem of a movie, one that’s rooted in details of people and place but that keeps opening up onto the universal.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    A strange and very beautiful documentary about the gray area between obsession and art.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    What happens between two people? Only the chemistry that keeps us from stumbling through the chaos by ourselves. Is that an illusion, too? Amour says it doesn't much matter. There is no dignity in life except love.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    More than "Unforgiven," more than "Mystic River," it is Clint Eastwood's autumnal masterpiece.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    At its most unsettling level, Spellbound asks us to consider what words are for and what childhood should be. It's as profound as anything you'll see this year, and, yes, it should have won the Oscar.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The strangest thing about Todd Haynes's new movie isn't that he cast six actors to play the various faces and phases of Bob Dylan. It's that he needed only six.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The documentary is an absolute delight, but it has a faith in everyday folks that feels both stalwart and melancholy, aware that these are exactly the people being swept away by the tides of modernity. It’s a sociopolitical cri de coeur disguised as a vacation.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    If Leviathan takes the Academy Award on the 22nd — and it’s considered the front-runner by some — it’ll be a win for great filmmaking and a loss for the Putin government.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The results bear witness to a time when sacrifice was bleached of everything but itself.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Elegantly depraved and immaculately degenerate, Park Chan Wook’s The Handmaiden is an astonishment. The filmmaking is masterful, very near to Hitchcock in its sly, controlled teasing of the audience.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    You could argue that Gandolfini doesn’t have enough screen time, but what’s there is, as they say, cherce. The scenes in which Albert and Eva get to know each other are delightful miniatures of emotional intimacy, two bruised romantics amazed to find someone still on their wavelength.

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