For 2,266 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ty Burr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Girlhood
Lowest review score: 0 Bratz
Score distribution:
2266 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The movie’s a funny, dark, increasingly razor-sharp inquiry into the metaphysics of modern fame — how the dream of “being seen” and thus validated on some primal level can completely unhinge the average schmo.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    If the first two films belong with the greatest (if talkiest) movie romances of all time, the new film is richer, riskier, and more bleakly perceptive about what it takes for love to endure (or not) over the long haul.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    20 Feet From Stardom may possibly be the happiest time you’ll have at the movies all summer, but it comes with a heavy load of frustration. The joy...is in the sound of women singing their big, beautiful hearts out. The pain comes from the anonymity they’ve spent their lives working under and fighting against.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    You could argue that Gandolfini doesn’t have enough screen time, but what’s there is, as they say, cherce. The scenes in which Albert and Eva get to know each other are delightful miniatures of emotional intimacy, two bruised romantics amazed to find someone still on their wavelength.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    All Is Lost works quite brilliantly on its most basic narrative level.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    12 Years a Slave is to the “peculiar institution” what “Schindler’s List” was to the Holocaust: a work that, finally, asks a mainstream audience to confront the worst of what humanity can do to itself. If there’s no Oskar Schindler here, that’s partly the point.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Her
    It is a love story. Also a profoundly metaphysical meditation on what it means to be human. Also one of the more touchingly relevant movies to the ways we actually live and may soon live. Oh, and the year’s best film, or at least the one that may stick with you until its story line comes true.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Cousin Jules is one of those rare experiences that’s rooted in the past yet feels very much of the moment. On top of that, it’s timeless.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Boyhood is a stunt, an epic, a home video, and a benediction. It reminds us of what movies could be and — far more important — what life actually is.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Birdman finds Iñárritu in the mood for play, and with a mighty cast that fields every pitch he throws.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    At Sundance, Whiplash quickly picked up the nickname “Full Metal Juilliard” on the basis of scenes in which Andrew, plucked from a late-night practice session to be the orchestra’s drummer, is raked over the coals by his new mentor. Horrifying as they are, these sequences are dazzling exercises in total humiliation.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Citzenfour is prosaic in its presentation and profoundly chilling in its details, and if you think Snowden is a traitor, you should probably see it. If you think he’s a hero, you should probably see it. If you haven’t made up your mind — well, you get the idea.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    A life is not plot; plot is not life. By scrupulously sticking not just to the accuracies of Turner’s life as we know them but to the tiniest of details, the chipped mugs on kitchen tables, the pantaloons on a passing merchant, the spray of storm surf across the bow of a ship, Leigh wants us to truly see the world Turner moved through. Only by seeing that world can we see how he saw and painted it.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    This is a small, compassionate gem of a movie, one that’s rooted in details of people and place but that keeps opening up onto the universal.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    If Leviathan takes the Academy Award on the 22nd — and it’s considered the front-runner by some — it’ll be a win for great filmmaking and a loss for the Putin government.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    When all is said and done, Goodbye to Language may simply be about Jean-Luc Godard exploring 3-D filmmaking, in the same way “The Shining” is really just about Stanley Kubrick wanting to fart around with a Steadicam. Which, honestly, is fine. Great artists use new tools to discover new vehicles for seeing, understanding, living. Be thankful we get to come along for the ride.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The movie captures that heady adolescent sense of time stopping and the moment mattering while standing far enough back to let us acknowledge all the pitfalls Marieme is moving too fast to see.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The shock, really, is how tender Mad Max: Fury Road ultimately becomes. The film just wraps that tenderness in one of the most epic action extravaganzas of recent years. It's enough to renew your faith in movies.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Over and over in The Look of Silence, we hear people tell the filmmakers, “The past is past.” The wound is healed, they say, and if you don’t want trouble, don’t reopen it. The movie itself proves otherwise.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The result is something that feels fresh, even revelatory — a work of elegiac bio-doc impressionism. Listen to Me Marlon gets under the skin of the most mysterious performer of the 20th century and forces us to recalibrate all our feelings about him.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The heroine’s voice-overs, delivered into the microphone of a Bell & Howell tape recorder in Minnie’s bedroom, are the movie’s motor. They’re proud and insecure, profanely comic, dripping with adolescent wisdom and self-absorption.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The movie works as a twinned character study, a moral suspense thriller, and an indictment of an America stacked against its working classes.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Room unfolds with the privilege of seeing and experiencing the world for the very first time, which is maybe the best we can ever expect from a medium like the cinema.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    One of the reasons that Spotlight is so deeply, absurdly satisfying to this newspaper writer — is that Tom McCarthy’s movie doesn’t turn its journalists into heroes. It just lets them do their jobs, as tedious and critical as those are, with a realism that grips an audience almost in spite of itself.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Carol is a movie to drink in with eyes, ears, and sensibilities.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    I emerged from the movie in a white-out haze of emotions, synapses overloaded, grateful beyond words to an actress who can convey so much with such subtlety of means.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The Fits is what independent moviemaking should be and can be in this country. Like its heroine, it’s slight but it’s built to last.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Elegantly depraved and immaculately degenerate, Park Chan Wook’s The Handmaiden is an astonishment. The filmmaking is masterful, very near to Hitchcock in its sly, controlled teasing of the audience.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    In its quietly radical grace, it’s a cultural watershed — a work that dismantles all the ways our media view young black men and puts in their place a series of intimate truths. You walk out feeling dazed, more whole, a little cleaner.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Manchester by the Sea is an experience worth having, not for the magnificence of its impact or the far-flung grandeur of its settings but for the way it illuminates with quiet, unyielding grace how you and I and our neighbors get by, and sometimes how we don’t.

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