For 1,500 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Wesley Morris' Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 To Be and to Have
Lowest review score: 0 From Justin to Kelly
Score distribution:
1,500 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    The ends remain loose in The White Ribbon.’ But that lack of closure is thrilling. Haneke lays his movie and its mysteries at our feet, leaving us to ask, “What in tarnation?’’
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    This movie catalogs a wealth of human ugliness. It’s even been made to look ugly, presumably to underscore the horror movie that is Precious’s life.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    A milestone of eloquent understatement that captures the daily life of have-nots as few American movies have.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    The movie is also more extraordinary than a mere scenic slideshow.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    Pan's Labyrinth is a transcendent work of art.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    There Will Be Blood" is anti-state of the art. It's the work of an analog filmmaker railing against an increasingly digitized world. In that sense, the movie is idiosyncratic, too: vintage visionary stuff.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    The usual emphasis in a detective film is upended so that procedure, thrillingly, is more important than action. In its own way, this is one of the most intense cop movies you'll see.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    I was much more disheartened leaving the movie the first time I saw it than I was the second. Its richness resides in its apparent objectivity. Without sacrificing a sense of hope, Cantet suggests that the school system is just like a certain vexing grammatical tense: imperfect but still fighting against irrelevance.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    Both a staggering realist thriller and a jeremiad.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    Ferguson's film is a clear-sighted counterpoint to the former secretary of defense's impression. As the title suggests, it's a seemingly infinite mess.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    This is an extraordinary artistic breakthrough from a Mexican director who was already fearlessly good to begin with.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    Jane Austen's novel has been rejiggered into a jaunty romantic comedy that leaves us as incandescently happy as its characters.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    With impeccable skill, Akin has made a film roiling with cruelty but guided by tough political optimism. No, we can't all get along, but some us of are trying.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    This is the most significant feature about poor black life since Charles Burnett's 1977 "Killer of Sheep."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    Not about crashing into walls or crashing into other people. It's about crashing into yourself and living to tell the tale.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    A marvelous, uncommonly observant, and unexpectedly rousing group portrait.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    This is a movie from the past that's also eerily of a piece with the film culture of now and tomorrow.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    Maurice Bénichou does the most heartbreaking work in the movie, playing a friend of Georges's. It's a character and a performance I'll have a tough time getting out of my dreams.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    Enigmatic as it is, The Intruder dares us to see movies as visual marvels tethered to humanity.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    The movie they've assembled is in the vein of 1973's "Wattstax," but it's much more than a concert documentary. It's a jubilant, civic-minded lollapalooza.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    A watchful, winding-down tragedy of a movie that delivers what it promises. As commentary, it's grim. As filmmaking, it's a powerfully disturbing odyssey through the Bucharest health care system.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    It's a thrill to watch Posey incorporate, at last, some true emotion into her exuberant screwball wit.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    It's one of the great movies on the vicissitudes of love, commitment, and attraction.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    Fast Food Nation has the dramatic flatness and willful lack of personality of some documentaries -- or at least how Linklater thinks a documentary should be. The movie nonetheless feels like both a work of investigative journalism and an immense human-interest story, veering into muckraking, horror, teen comedy, and what passes for "Twilight Zone" science fiction.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    As demonstrated in his previous film, a plangent snapshot of subsistence called "Waiting for Happiness," Sissako is a poet, and the filmmaking in this new picture is stuff of a deserving laureate.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    It's so hypnotically breathtaking, you don't realize you're not breathing. By the final shot, you don't realize you're crying either, but there go the tears.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    By nearly every measure, Milk is a beautifully made, far less conventional movie biography than most.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    A deep, exhaustive, and moving piece of do-it-yourself detective work.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    This is the first beautiful performance in the year's first great movie.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    Guy Maddin is a scholar, poet, prankster, and ferociously devoted classicist who likes to resurrect dead cinemas and deader directors and make them vital all over again.