Wesley Morris

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For 1,825 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Wesley Morris' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Amores Perros
Lowest review score: 0 P2
Score distribution:
1825 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Piercingly co-written and directed by Susanne Bier, the movie dramatizes one man's collapse and the other's surprising maturation.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Norton is unapologetic and unflappable in his part. Slimy and vaguely nerdy, he's become the thinking man's thug, even if this character's Armani-wear is better tailored than his psychology.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Sings in the key of life.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Phyllis and Harold is really about Phyllis and how discontent has a way of spilling, then spreading. Kleine never quite says so, but her mother’s life was a tragedy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The movie's narrative can be taxingly ornate, but there's something beautiful about its metaphorical conflation of politics and glamour, the real and the fictional.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    This low-rent, nonsense cop business filled me with a nostalgic twinge. I didn't know I wanted the "Police Academy" series resurrected with a lot more hilarity, but I'm glad somebody did it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Amazingly, no one seems steeped in the salubrious self-explication of therapy. They just sound like very good storytellers.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Sayles seems to be trying, single-handedly, to correct centuries of First World self-centeredness in Third World contexts.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Raimi, who shares script credit with his brother Ivan and Alvin Sargent, strikes an exquisite balance between pop and woe, drama and whooshing adventure.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A tidy soap opera. But it's a discreet, warmly made one, too. In a show of restraint, the intrigue never rises above mildly juicy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The bliss of Megamind is the way it pursues solutions for tired problems.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Hot-blooded.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Despite the appearance of numerous free-speaking conservatives, the movie's partisanship leans nakedly to the left.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Most crucially, Barrymore encourages Page to just let herself go. The sight of her making her way up residential streets in a pair of Barbie roller skates or screaming “Marco’’ in a game of Marco Polo is simply joyful.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    If anyone is capable of pulling off a deviled screwball with cheeky panache, it's de la Iglesia, who's one of the world's great nutty directors yet to find the American following he so richly deserves.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Dogma' is Kevin Smith's fourth film and it looks like his first but I'm not ready to quit him -- there's a landmark in him. I just wish the crafty, raucous Dogma was it.
    • San Francisco Examiner
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    I don’t think the movie is looking for answers; it isn’t asking any questions. But by its very nature, this is both an experiment in ontology (do babies know they’re babies?) and existentialism (are they thinking about who to be?).
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    What the cast members lack in sharpened skill they more than make up for in raw gusto and athletic scrappiness (most of the actors have logged a lot of soccer in their pasts). These guys give a sport that is virtually nameless in the movies a good name in this one.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    An absorbing piece of investigative journalism.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Duplicity so thoroughly equates sex and money that, in a manner apt for a recession, the audience is rewired when it's over. You don't care whether they love each other. You just want to see them paid.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Peculiarly entertaining exercise in bare-bones, Hollywood-style action heroism.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Broadway-sized performances.
    • San Francisco Examiner
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Engrossing, smartly made documentary.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    This present-day Paris of Le Divorce is smartly shot and costumed, and the whole affair is breezy and uncharacteristically insouciant, given the reserved nature of the folks responsible for it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Corny. But it's corny in a way that a Hollywood movie about a boy who just wants to go home ought to be corny. Plus when it's done with this much care, corny works for me.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Breezy humor and a dazzling heist keep 'Ocean' franchise in the money.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The movie brings to mind the more polite parts of "Wedding Crashers." Failure to Launch, while totally exuberant and appealingly made, is not nearly as randy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It looks great and the dancing is the kind of stuff that would upstage the average pop star.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    This is a smart piece of revisionist fluff that dares to question what happens after the royal honeymoon is over.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    In its seriousness, Syriana has an absorbing, ominous roundness that plays even better with a second viewing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Where a lesser movie from a lesser director might sink into its own ponderousness, Sokurov uses the ambiguity of the father and son's relationship to craft a sort of erotic puzzle.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    At its best when it's hovering around the muted dysfunction between a father and a son, who never understood each other to begin with.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Watching Jackson pop, lock, rock, writhe, thrust, and clutch his crotch, even at 50 percent, leaves a feeling of woe: This show really would have been major.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Hall Pass is the brothers' 10th movie, and their most gangbusters since "Me, Myself & Irene."
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    What the movie lacks in technical polish (it's not very handsome-looking) and dramatic perfection, it makes up for in unusual social sophistication.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    This is blissful moviemaking. Much of the pleasure we have in watching it comes from seeing Tucci and, obviously, Streep connect.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Hooper, the director, doesn’t include lots of amazing football sequences to upstage his star. He just moves everyone out of Sheen’s way. It’s about time.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Outrage succeeds as activism, but it excels as a window into certain political psyches.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The story is a mess. But On Guard was directed by the reliable Philippe de Broca, who imbues the whole affair with high-calorie silliness.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It's a quiet little gag homage both to Boris Karloff and to the set up of shelf-loads of pulp novels and films noir. And Peltola, with his flat, serious face and damp, oil-black hair, happens to look, at times, like Richard Widmark and Kirk Douglas.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The longer the film goes on, the more you crave a vaster history of modern Liberia, originally a colony founded by former slaves from the United States.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The film is alt-schmaltz, and it'll do.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The movie has a lot going for it. In less than 90 minutes, it walks us through sketches of Vreeland's private life and the formulation and decades-long execution of her philosophy in the pages of Harper's Bazaar and Vogue. The energy here is a selling point.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Week in and week out, horror movies cheat us, so it's wonderfully cathartic to watch a bunch of kids cheat death in what turns out to be the best installment yet in the "Final Destination" franchise.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The movie has a great time playing with ideas of scope and perspective, shifting between microscopic and macroscopic.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    "Ashes of Time" was always more a work of philosophy than pure entertainment, and a decade and a half later it still is.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The journey's a kick.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    What the movie lacks in ambition, originality, and grit, it makes up for in pure feeling.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The sort of smutty scandalmongering the average moviegoer can really get behind.
    • San Francisco Examiner
    • 24 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Armed with a dinner theater accent and hair that looks like an LP melted on his head, Turturro pockets the picture. As a demonstration of his newly accessed maturity and benevolence, Sandler helps him do it.
    • Boston Globe
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The film is faithful to its absurdities, sometimes hilariously so.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    As directed by Nobuhiro Yamashita , the sluggish haze between extracurricular activities is exquisitely captured and framed, then patiently edited. Every shot feels like a gift.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Bobby marks a turning point for Colin Farrell, whose vulgarities and inelegance tend to get the better of his range.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The violence in the final 45 minutes of Mr. Vengeance is tough to watch.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The movie's patient in the way of "El Bulli: Cooking in Progress" or "Jiro Dreams of Sushi." That's where culinary nonfiction is now - sleepy, observant. And, for the most part, that's OK.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    As a production, Fados is pretty with its reflected surfaces and many projected images. But at times it hurts for the bite and texture of life outside that studio. For all the dolorous singing about and shots of streets, it'd be nice to hit one.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It's hilarious -- and on purpose, too. This is the first satisfying adult summer comedy set in New England to come out of Hollywood since "The Witches of Eastwick" in 1987.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    This is a film about small victories, huge defeats and finding the will to keep fighting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Distinguishes itself from the recent glut of mediocre political documentaries by opting for nonpartisanship.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It's fun, it's kind of somber and it succeeds in making you think about how you might be squandering middle age.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Mercifully, The Station Agent is not about how these misfits heal one another -- they're not that miserable, for one thing. It's about the unlikely ways proximity, need, and coincidence create friendships.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Working with his brother Ivan, Sam Raimi is laughing with us - and often louder than we are.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The mother-child dynamic here is the fraught stuff of any worthy melodrama.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The film is built to quaver and buckle along with its victims and martyrs. In an almost soulful way, it bespeaks the reality lingering when the final fantasy ends.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Many of the backgrounds look like watercolors that are either drying or dying.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    This movie is basically where some small-screen comedy in the last year has been: "2 Broke Girls," "New Girl," and, their far superior sister, "Girls."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Cuesta prizes curiosity and perception over conflict resolution. He likes the way kids take their cues from adults and the ways they revolt against them. Even as the kids do the ugliest things, the film stays cool without ever being cold.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Holofcener writes as well as Albert Brooks at his best, and her finesse with actors is as assured as James L. Brooks's on his TV and film projects from 20 and 30 years ago.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Stooge-filled farce offers low laughs but lacks a point.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A shockingly eloquent, nearly moving feat of Y2K-trendiness.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Hardship and suffering don't drive this movie so much as a romantic's gloss on the two.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Fancher's placid, eerily subdued first directorial feature.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Yes, Younger has made an update of the ''shiksa who changed my life" story in ''Annie Hall." But Prime is missing the psychological acuity and scabrous cultural wit of Woody Allen at his best. These lovers meet standing in line to see Antonioni's ''Blow-Up" and never mention the movie.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The film is profane. But who knew police brutality could play as a laughing matter?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Only loosely concerned with behind-the-scenes gossip and is squarely focused on the nature of Fellini's insatiability.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    There's scarcely any dialogue, and the "hukkle" sound is universal enough to make subtitles unnecessary and to please an audience of any age and attention span.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Raimi seems more comfortable being his outlandishly jokey, B-movie self, letting entire sequences play on the line between carefree schlock and Hollywood blockbusting.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Watching them issue hugs produces an involuntary response. You want to hug them, too.
    • Boston Globe
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    As a filmmaker Soderbergh requires nothing more of us than a willingness to enjoy ourselves. He had fun. Why shouldn't we? With Contagion, the fun begins with a cough.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Part of what hooks you to this movie is how Leth outsmarts his taskmaster, and how the two men have divergent, almost incompatible aesthetic ideals.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Walking the line between the movie’s broad strokes and its near-perfect pitch is the art itself, which has been designed and constructed by a team of smart designers.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It really only comes alive in its shots of people in the neighborhood sitting around their television sets. What we're really talking about here is a problem in scope. In Hamburger's film, the world is no bigger than a cup.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The directors and distributors can't rely on us. They should be implored to watch their movies in the same theaters we do. It's the only way for them to understand that a crime is being committed.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Witherspoon is a professional, demanding we give ourselves over to her carbonated pluck.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    In Every Little Step, the performers bleed, sweat, cry theater - without having to tell us.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Penn's Kumar could become Jeff Spicoli for the generation of college kids who've never seen "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" but always seem to have a copy of "Dude, Where's My Car?" cued up at a moment's notice.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Cinema's greatest caveman meets his ancestors. For us, it's a reassurance: The creative process is astonishingly old and its fruits still surprisingly fresh.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It's all a treat to behold, and, at least where the turtle and the jellyfish are concerned, it's transcendently beautiful, too. I just wish there was more of it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Engrossing and provocative.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Yet despite the retrospective sensationalism, Lovett's 70-minute documentary is a sobering anti-erotic cautionary tale.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The film elects a storytelling manner that's scarily similar to the beginning of a lot of hip-hop thrillers.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Disarmingly intelligent if scattered documentary.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Mysteries of Lisbon brings us far inside oil-on-canvas in a way that isn't imitative. It's simply, magically a moving picture, what a movie in the 1800s would look like.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The Box is the work of a visionary flirting with commercialism after having so grandly flouted it with “Southland Tales.’’ He doesn’t give in completely. Several trips to the megaplex might be required for The Box to make complete sense.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    There’s a lot of Michael Moore’s ambulatory spirit in this film, which the comedian Jeff Stinson directed. There’s also a lot of the damning comedic commentary that made Rock’s old HBO series so urgent.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A must-see.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Wetzel's challenge is to film the experiments so that the process itself is legible. We're made to marvel at slow-cooked, freeze-dried, unappetizingly bagged food, the way some mushrooms, when delicately sliced, evoke fruit and some crustaceans resemble side-sleeping snooze-bar slappers.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Deadly funny.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Binoche is the ideal creature for that kind of cosmetic expansion, and, here, her thorough modernity takes on an almost cruddy, Italian sadness.
    • San Francisco Examiner
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It's done persuasively enough that you wonder how you'd feel under similar circumstances.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The fun is in watching these robustly generic people trip over and pinball off of each other, seeing them eddy around Carell, who as the straight man here is getting dangerously close to Greg Kinnear's territory - where comedy is too self-serious to laugh at.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    This engrossing and provocative documentary is also about a tragic kind of liberal guilt.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Ultimately affecting mix 'n' match weeper.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The pleasure of this small, eccentric movie is the natural way Carano hurts people - by, say, walking partway up a wall and climbing onto a man's back, by sprinting toward the camera and flying into the human target standing in the foreground.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Tom Cruise might have saved his family from apocalypse. But Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn have just saved our summer.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    As is par for the course in a "Fast and Furious'' movie, the only persuasive physical intimacy is between the men.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It would be a stretch to call The Simpsons Movie more than a crisper, livelier-looking episode of the series. The change in mediums changes nothing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    What ought to be a bittersweet movie about a woman's momentary unraveling feels like a workout class: Cardio melodrama.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The images in The Song of Sparrows have a poetic grace that's to be desired in storytelling. You feel Majidi's hand much more than you do God's.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    With relentless and ruminative deliberateness, Reygadas shows us a Mexico City that seems to be decaying from the inside out.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The Flowers of War is the latest movie focused on the Nanking atrocities. Lu Chuan's "City of Life and Death'' was released in the United States last year and presented a far greater, grimmer, and more punishing re-creation of the sacking.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A movie drunk on its very existence, one that misses more frequently than it hits and couldn't care less.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie's primary narrative weakness is that its racism plot points seem ripped from the headlines of a "Geraldo" newsletter and stretched into a string of terribly executed car chases.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie will please those looking for easy physical comedy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Things stay standard-issue French self-analytical from here.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's one of the most beautifully unpleasant movies ever made - its reverse charge being that it is no fun at all.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A watchably absurd popcorn flick about a man who can see two minutes into the future.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A gentle collection of scenes that work and scenes that don't.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Not so much a documentary as it is a bald-faced party movie.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's fun to see Tom Wilkinson, for instance, with a massive bald spot virtually eating scenery with a knife and fork.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    In a refreshing change of pace, this week's anti-Bush documentary, Bush's Brain, is not really about George W. Bush at all. It's about his senior political adviser, Karl Rove.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie doesn't trust that an illuminating comedy of pathetic people can be entertaining for long, so it sprinkles some hormones on the proceedings.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Fans likely to rave about Living.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    This remake does something less organically fun. It makes kids nostalgic for something they never experienced.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie is another of those harmless and politely made dark comedies that the English seem incapable of doing without.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Leaves you longing for the other, better political thrillers it evokes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The most powerful moment in the film is a tiny one. Anker and his Irvine, Leo Houlding, plan to reenact most of Mallory's climb wearing gabardine and hobnail boots instead of North Face and Gore-Tex.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Directing Annapolis is Justin Lin, whose previous feature was the irresponsible high-school comedy thriller "Better Luck Tomorrow." This second movie is more his speed.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The film doesn't amount to an emotionally palpable experience. Most of the stops it attempts to pull out are rusty. The movie ends with a gigantic lump in its throat, one that would take a tall glass of Barbara Stanwyck to wash down.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Brown lays out his guiding philosophy up front when he says of the Baja, ''This isn't about a race, it's about the human race."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Huppert's character, who's a tornado of demands at work, is almost as obnoxious as Poel-voorde's. She just not as willfully disgusting. He chews up all the scenery with his thick Belgian accent and splaying limbs and general cartoonishness.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Miral feels like gastric bypass moviemaking. It's a miniseries awkwardly stuffed in the body of a two-hour drama about the Palestinians' long struggle against the Israelis.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Regardless of how cheated out of a full-bodied motion picture you feel, you're still left with the year's sickest bathroom humor.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    At some point, he finds himself drifting around a swimming pool, and it's tempting to think of Dustin Hoffman sinking to the bottom of the deep end in "The Graduate." But there's a difference. Swanson's pool is empty.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie, from South Africa, is charming and its characters' feelings sincere enough. It's just so cluttered.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    If the movie weren't so playfully dumb -- did you ever think you'd see Ian McShane throw Andy Samberg through a basement shelving unit? -- this would be exasperating.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The film moves slowly and steadily, but it's never exactly dull, just mild.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A bizarre film.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The film leaves you dissatisfied, as though you'd just spent two hours with a menagerie of plastic white people.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie is just a cheesy, preposterous, semi-eroticized way of yelling, "Fight! Fight!," when two people go at it in the school cafeteria.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The overall lack of subtlety is a riot - there's even a cautionary production of "Peter and the Wolf" happening in the background during one journalist-politician showdown at a Beltway gala. Still, it's a pleasure watching this cast make the most of the material.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The idea that self-mockery makes people relax is tricky. One man's disarmament is another's minstrelsy, and the fine line is well worth another documentary.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    More of a sand-and-noodles western set in the Far East.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Basically an addiction thriller in which the thirst is for the acquisition and execution of knowledge. So you need an actor who seems surprised by how smart he is but not afraid to be charmingly intelligent. Cooper turns out to be perfect for the part.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The Daddy Day Care business model appears to be the 1983 Michael Keaton vehicle ''Mr. Mom,'' put on an unstoppable sugar high.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie is church via the planetarium. It's as if Malick set out to paint the Sistine Chapel and settled for a dome at the Museum of Natural History.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    As a consideration of faith and propriety, the movie never managed to boil my blood or break my heart.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A less confrontational, though positively gushing modernization of "Pierre, or the Ambiguities."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's entertaining enough, like watching a celebrity workout film with a plot. But never once is it believable.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie is too pious for farce and too eager to please to comment persuasively on the racial horrors of the Deep South at that time.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The jokes are as fresh as rotten eggs and the direction stoops to the occasion.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Whatever Evening is saying about life, death, and guilt isn't terribly new or interesting.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Shouting the title never quite prepared me for either how stripping zombies aren't as hot or as funny as I thought they would be or how quickly the movie's eager intelligence collapses on itself.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    After 110 minutes of the "n" word being deployed with abandon, Biggie vows to renounce it. And just like that a deluxe episode of "Behind the Music" turns into an evening at church.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The clichés are still clichés. They've just been renovated.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Nicely shot and edited, but the movie is a narrative mess, which wouldn't be so bad if all it were up to was depicting Lucia's ups and downs. But the film takes too many illogical detours to be of much use.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Easily, the best character in the film is Nazneen's tubby husband, who's been angling to take the family back to Bangladesh.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Neeson is much better suited to the loneliness and self-doubt of Martin's crisis than he was for the thuggery of the previous movie.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    For kids strung out on Anthony Horowitz's 007-lite adventure series, this maiden adaptation is a pleasant enough diversion from having to flip the pages.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's an interesting, if dissatisfying rumination on the working people of industry -- how they labor, how they rest, what they think and feel.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Urban and Bloodgood make the most of their parts, locking eyes and arms, and occasionally using American English as if the snowy 10th century were another way of saying, "Where the après ski?"
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    xXx
    As Diesel says, ''I like something fast enough to do something stupid in.'' Mission accomplished.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Invites you not simply to identify with its low IQ but to cheer it on. This is a movie that knows you know it's dumb, and that's enough to make the whole thing worth tolerating.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    National Treasure even has a rough time approaching the heart of ''The Amazing Race," a show that manages, in 44 minutes, to make you care about average folks as they follow clues across the globe.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    You might cheer. You might cry. For a minute, you might even wish it were you on that medal stand.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    As ridiculous German suspense dramas go, you could do worse than Jerichow.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    On most levels his performance is as flat as his abs: very early Wahlberg.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie feels incomplete and uncentered. It's like a grand magazine profile that's all reportage and absolutely no prose.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The cast is strong. Kudrow and Gyllenhaal provide the movie's emotional center.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    After an hour or so, Ask the Dust seems to have said everything, and the air starts to seep out of its hermetic atmosphere.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Richard Kelly's Southland Tales isn't just a movie. It's an apocalyptic piñata that's been bazooka-ed open.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Street Kings is nonsense, and yet the crooked, racialized world underneath the soulless mayhem is pretty fascinating.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Neither a profile nor a critique, though, the film's only focus is its subject's mild self-regard.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The songs are catchy. The lip-synching, meanwhile, is always a little off, and the dancing is usually average at best.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Metz is another artist more interested in war's side effects than combat itself, although he and his crew are embedded for battle.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Broad and badly made but sporadically inspired, "Chuck and Larry" is still an amazing improvement over "License to Wed," this month's other wedding comedy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The Last Mountain is that sort of movie, the sort that sends a Kennedy into the West Virginia wilderness to press for change. It's sincere. It's misguided. It feels like a stunt.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    An effortless heartwarmer that manages to be utterly corny but quite likable.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A feel-good but inane Disney production.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The welcome hints at emotional excess are compromised by the blunt force of the movie's political point-making.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A movie that seems to have been made mostly on the hard drive of a Power Mac G4. But whatever, we get it: Technology destroys everything.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    In the intervening years, they've become pretty good actors, too. Now where's the filmmaker who'll give them more to do than pregnancy scares and falls off donkeys?
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Bullock’s levelheaded acting frequently saves the movie from emotional garishness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Curran is a talented director, especially where his actors are concerned. His previous movie, "We Don't Live Here Anymore," an adaptation of two Andre Dubus stories, was another literary adultery drama featuring Watts. The Painted Veil doesn't achieve the fire that characterized that film.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Half hearted in its mockery of corporate culture and schlock. The filmmakers want to have it both ways -- the funny and the sadistic -- but rarely do so at the same time with any success.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie dreamily conjures up the outlaw's last months, and it's gorgeous, but long, cumbersome, and slightly shallow.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Any movie that would think Calista Flockhart to be the sort of high-strung basket case who'd hurl obscenities down at a dog kennel outside her apartment is worth sitting through.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Full of redeeming throwaways.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Redundant for a filmmaker whose work has always dealt with the dismaying consequences of this country’s profit motive. Isn’t every Michael Moore film ultimately about capitalism? This one just has a more facetious title.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The film turns that stale old Seder into warmed-up dinner theater.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's a portrait of the artist as Mary Poppins.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A belligerent little sex farce roiling inside an otherwise inconsequential lampoon of corporate America, the movie is rude and ridiculous, fearless up to a point, and breathtakingly hungry to provoke.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    In Catch a Fire Noyce has caught the holy spirit. The movie is a thriller that wants to lift you up.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Regardless, it's sad that Singleton is taking Diesel's sloppy seconds.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's called Pride, and, while it's neither as socially urgent as "Freedom Writers" nor as danceable and soapy as "Stomp the Yard," it's better acted and tougher to resist
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie does offer intriguing, perceptive glimpses of the everyday difficulties of being both a survivor and the child of a survivor.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    You're smarter than this, but occasionally it tricks you into thinking it might be up to something you haven't considered, like an above-average, extra-bloody episode of "Scooby Doo."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    As involved as Crudup and Connelly beseech you to be with this story, their very youthfulness, their nagging lack of adulthood, keeps the film from being anything more credible than a tight grad-school tryst.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie is foggy with reverence and uncertainty. This is the passive work of a man nervous to touch the third rail of his parents' discontent.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie is a commercial for Hugh Hefner that makes his magazine seem like "Seventeen."
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Rebound is about as unmotivated as Coach Roy, doing nothing to distinguish itself from any other movie ever made about winless teams that learn to stop losing.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    An unsteady stab at noir.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie offers up too many airy spiritual lessons in the hope of crossing from farce to sentiment.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Manages to fascinate more than it entertains.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's hard to dislike a film that wants to say that the bereft have to move on with their lives, that death is part of living, and that poverty is a state of mind. But it's not impossible.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's unbelievably bland.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Sexual doublespeak is everywhere.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's a grisly, chuckling cartoon made on shots of tequila, Red Bull, and Sergio Leone.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    As predictably uplifting movies go, Saint Ralph isn't completely charmless.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Disappointing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    As easy as this movie is to watch, it's artificially flavored. "Golden Flower" runs on crocodile tears and corn-syrup blood.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The most disappointing thing here, besides Perry's ongoing visual impairment (he deserves better cinematography and editing) is Scott.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Overstays its welcome until the jokes curdle and the satire becomes a blunt instrument, but not before Busch throws some priceless one-liners.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's inspired of Sachs to lean on Russell for a kind of oblique emotional depth. But it's possible to leave this movie mistaking Sachs's soul for Russell's.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Woody Allen's questionable toe-tapping faux-documentary.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    What Conviction lacks in characterization (the people here are monochromes - bright ones, but monochromes nonetheless) it makes up for with personality.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Has the problem of drifting in and out of authenticity.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The cute little domestic comedy gains a slightly rough edge - maybe Sven isn't meant to be a father or a husband.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Shannon gives the movie its inner life. Maybe the movie will give her back her comedy career.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The ballets are badly filmed. The camera shoots them often from the point of view of the patrons in the auditorium or in a way that dishonors the choreography.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    This is the feistiest Hollywood movie about American women and their thankless jobs since "9 to 5."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Indeed, woe be to the child who doesn't mist up at this movie, since it's been made if not with zip, wit, or imagination, then at least with sweetness. But I hope no one will think the film is an adequate replacement for White's book. That would be a crime.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    In light of our recent crackdown on runaway nudity, the steady stream of exposed breasts in the gnarly Eurotrip give it a nostalgic feel.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It just feels like playacting.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It wants, as Kate says about her documentary, to be a "seminal work on beauty and aging." But it wears like a gauzy romantic comedy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    I could have watched this woman rip a piece fabric and turn it into a dress all day. I haven’t seen a lot of that. I have seen movies about a woman caught between two men, as Chanel is here.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Even at 148 minutes (and viewed twice!), you still feel as if you’re watching the longest coming attraction ever for a John Woo movie.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's looking for comedy and romance in the obvious places.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's the year's funniest, most absurd sight gag.
    • San Francisco Examiner
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Die Another Day is still as professionally mediocre as its predecessors.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie has a field day with thousands of airborne lanterns, a troop of Neanderthal thugs (one is a mime), some surprisingly fleet camerawork, and good editing. I can't think of a cartoon more confident about how to use jump cuts for comedy. Those senses of cleverness and innovation merely underscore how shopworn the rest of this movie is.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Who knew that the franchise’s creators would eventually find a plot twist that made sense?
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie usefully, carefully, and cogently argues that Bieber is more than his hair. He is his hoodies. He is his pop-hooks. He is his many handlers.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    More like that crowd-pleasing UK fluff that requires great actresses to do wacky things. Mirren is such an easy, breezy presence that you might think she's playing the screenwriting equivalent of air.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The screenplay by Robert Nelson Jacobs affirms life and jerks tears with welcome degrees of humor and muscle.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Despite Aniston's hard work, Good Girl could be better.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A proudly unsophisticated demonstration of racial progress.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Turistas is not a slasher film -- not conventionally. Released by Fox's new teen division, it's the latest aquatic titillation from John Stockwell, the man who also brought us "Blue Crush" and the shockingly good "Into the Blue."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Frances McDormand rescues this role from the throes of cliche. It's as though drippy dialogue and sappy rock were a small price to pay for a part that lets her flash her breasts, get stoned, and join in a three-way.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's that awkward, tedious monster mash of "chick flick'' and romantic comedy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    An arch espionage comedy that's never as amusing as it thinks it is.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Unique because it's the rare movie that fiercely respects the altruistic loyalty that bonds girls to one another.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The comedy in Robelin's movie veers from wacky and overwritten to truly, beautifully sad, especially the whimsical final sequence, which is as apt an existential tribute to the afterglow of Fonda's fabulousness as you'll see.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Gets on your nerves.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    "Joshua" is a horror movie that doesn't want to freak you out too much. Vitus freaks you out, but its makers seem to have no idea that it does.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie doesn't know what it wants to say about the election or the people who run in it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    This isn't a great piece of nonfiction filmmaking, but it has its moments.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Downey appears to like all this make-believe. Even the clunky dialogue sounds witty out of his mouth. This is not a part that makes great demands on his talent, and his slummy approach to it is amusing.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    I wanted to keep watching. I wanted to leave. In between, I prayed for the piano-accordion soundtrack to silence itself for just one scene (it's like being trapped in a little French restaurant that refuses to close).
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The film feels like bare- bones docu-fiction, though, resisting the attendant drama until the bitter, grisly end.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Not a happy time at the movies. It bears the distinction of bringing to the screen a dark nugget of history.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's a thriller that refuses to thrill. It taunts us with resolution and mysteries, then slaps our hand for reaching out for a conclusion.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A terrifyingly cheap-looking B-movie comedy mocking terrifyingly cheap-looking science-fiction B-movies. As such things go, this one has its moments.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The whimsy Greenebaum wants to construct can't match the terminal sadness that naturally takes over the film. Perhaps in accidental tribute to Todd, the whole thing feels half-baked.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Has a silly, insouciant glamour often employed to sell hair conditioners and perfume.
    • San Francisco Examiner
    • 25 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    As dumb spoofs go, The Comebacks isn't bad. It takes almost every sports movie of the last five years ("Field of Dreams," too) and blends them into a single slapdash comedy.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A satire whose dead aim stops wounding - and starts making - stereotypes of white middle-classness.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The film's good humor is often betrayed by its low-budget roots, however, as though it couldn't afford to be more original or ambitious than its premise.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Mac's TV show seems to have trained him to settle for feel-good tack-ons that cut against the prickly nature of Mr. 3000. The actor has such a serious and wise bearing that it's hard to believe Stan as a shallow jackass, which is why several of his scenes with Boca seem phony.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Works purely as a series of complex snapshots of the conflict in Iraq.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Crashes the slapstick of "Home Alone" into the youthful angst of "The Breakfast Club."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Cool It arrives having been labeled the anti-"An Inconvenient Truth." It is. But not in the philistinistic way you'd expect.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A minor movie on a major subject, a drama with an almost unbearable lightness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    There's the air of sadness and worry all over this movie, and sometimes it's heavy. But it's air all the same.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Over the course of the film's 88-minutes, Taylor cuts away to what's happening around her subjects (the unexamined life, I suppose). Perhaps she's attempting to make connections the thinkers don't.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    In tone and plotting, Away We Go feels like a fairy tale built on an aggravating collection of attitudes. It's condescending, judgmental, righteous, yet sincerely searching.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    This is what the ongoing onslaught of comic book movies lacks: stars. Real stars. Robert Downey Jr. is the exception when he should be the rule. It's possible we take these movies for granted because the marketing tells us we should.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    As a movie, it’s a mess — and lazy, too.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    For his part, Short, another pop choreographer, sounds like Vin Diesel, but he moves like a bee. When he dances, he makes sure every girl in the theater goes home stung.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A runny intimate portrait that doesn't trust Tammy Faye Messner and her story to enthrall you. So they've all but spelled it out: k-i-t-s-c-h.
    • San Francisco Examiner
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    This isn't a case of a liberal-minded movie inflicting goodness upon a character but a man radiating goodness because, well, he is good.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Playing the character with this much girlish innocence is risky. Barrymore can seem dumb, but as Lucky You unfolds, we realize that the character is just a device to bring viewers into the parallel universe of poker.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A microscopic piece of shoestring weirdness-slash-hipster regionalism that the actor Robert Longstreet delivers into some odder, funkier, altogether mysterious place. I don't know what he's doing or what he's going for. But unlike the rest of the movie, his bizarreness seems authentic rather than forced or put on.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    This is a bright, broad, silly, harmless movie whose sweetness is a means to an end.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Partly impressive, partly inane buck-banging toy of a movie.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Sadly, the movie is a zoo.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Like watching somebody else's flashback and wondering what you were doing then instead.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    As close as a movie about three Iraq war soldiers should come to mediocre TV comedy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's all terribly sentimental without being truly terrible.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The voice actors are also excellent, especially Michael-Leon Wooley as a bouncy trumpet-playing alligator and Jim Cummings as a lovelorn Cajun firefly.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The film is in the key of "Romeo and Juliet," and it's a one-note tune.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Like most movies about men and horses, Hidalgo spares no expense in matters of corniness. Set in the 1890s, it's sort of a throwback movie, executed with the boyish kick of dusty old cowboy matinees.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    This is as safe and sweet a movie as you could make about America’s sex-drugs-and-rock ’n’ roll-est event.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Garçon Stupide was shot on digital video and is the rare piece of European sexual realism centered completely on a boy's awakening.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    At its best, Swept Away is like a scrapbook of postcards starring two lovebirds with great tans.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A good, occasionally insightful workplace comedy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Installment six of the Harry Potter’ series, The Half-Blood Prince, merely gets us one movie closer to the finale, which, apparently is so big (and by big, I mean “$$$$’’) that it’s being split into two parts.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie itself isn't nearly as interesting as whatever it is Foster is trying to work out for its two hours.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Feels conceived and shot on the fly -- like between lunch breaks for Shearer's radio show and his ''Simpson'' voice-overs.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A sporadically entertaining cupcake of a movie.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A ludicrous little abduction thriller that boasts an entertaining cocktail of gunpowder, suspense, adrenaline, and cheese. I just couldn't hate this movie, and I really, really tried. It's tightly made and well written in deceptive ways that don't reveal themselves until past the halfway point.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Duvauchelle is actually the best thing in the movie.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Aiming to keep it real, the cast of the new dance casserole Center Stage sweats spunk.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A self-consciously arch work of hipsterism that's more styled than funny.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The best there is to say is that it's better than ''Troy."
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    This movie has no light to shed on the matter. It is its own contradiction: a film about confessions in which nothing much is confessed.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    This new movie is crazier, scarier, funnier, and more bewildering. It's the strangest movie I expect to see from a Hollywood studio for the rest of the year.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Honestly, the whole movie is from 1960-something.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The actor's job here is the hardest to pull off, since practical skepticism in a Tim Burton picture is next to villainy. Yet Crudup suggests complex grown-up feelings that makes the rest of Big Fish feel like an earnest collection of magic tricks.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Like all of Jacquot's movies, it's not crazy enough.

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