For 1,500 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Wesley Morris' Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Pan's Labyrinth
Lowest review score: 0 From Justin to Kelly
Score distribution:
1,500 movie reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    These people may be really, really dangerous, but they're also really, really polite.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Raimi seems more comfortable being his outlandishly jokey, B-movie self, letting entire sequences play on the line between carefree schlock and Hollywood blockbusting.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    What's special about the movie is how totally it believes in itself as a musical. The tunes, co-written by Sandler and a bunch of his pals, take on rock opera and traditional Jewish folk music with boyish exuberance.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    At the heart of most of these encounters is talk about the nature of relationships -- cousins, twins, and peers. Mostly, though, Jarmusch displays an unexpected interest in the ironies and banalities of fame.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Elf
    The movie sets Ferrell's assaultive and juvenile physical comedy in a less-combative playground, and the result might leave the Ferrell-intolerant exiting the theater on a high.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The movie is always entertaining and frequently smart about the new ground one girl will break to humiliate another.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Every moment... is a cleverly constructed live-action joke on aloofness: The world is ending, and these people are too self-centered to notice.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It's hilarious -- and on purpose, too. This is the first satisfying adult summer comedy set in New England to come out of Hollywood since "The Witches of Eastwick" in 1987.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Brims with forboding, but it pulses with candy colors and the hum of neon signs.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Penn's Kumar could become Jeff Spicoli for the generation of college kids who've never seen "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" but always seem to have a copy of "Dude, Where's My Car?" cued up at a moment's notice.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A hip-hop cousin of Prince's ''Purple Rain,'' which had braver fashion sense and better original songs.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The film Soderbergh's made is about promiscuous stargazing. And you don't need a brain for that, just two eyes and a mammoth appetite for heavenly bodies.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The film, which is as economically made as it is primitively animated, ambles from adventure to adventure, taking nothing seriously, not even itself.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The performance often errs on the side of cartoon, but it's laced with flashes of remorse and chagrin, with sincerity. When Carrey tries to do "dramatic acting'' the life always goes of out him.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    If this is an unusually sentimental outing for Jia, it’s also characteristically tinged with woe. He’s just added a touch of sweetness to these otherwise sugarless lives.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Is it a romantic comedy? Is it a chick flick? This is silly, since, in truth, it's neither. It's simply a Julia Roberts movie, often a lovely one.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    One of the best things about Nolan as a director is that he’s not self-conscious. His movies unfold and fold in on themselves without the strain of labor or flash. But that lack of self-consciousness is also Nolan’s downside.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The film spends its first half explaining the song -- famously and vividly about the cycle of Southern lynching. Its better second half-hour unmasks its composer as a compassionate Jewish guy from the Bronx.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    There is a lot to recommend about James' Journey to Jerusalem. Its people are not among them. This searing little parable contains some of the more deplorable folks you're likely to see in a movie about faith.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    This is one beautifully drawn, frequently lifelike piece of anime.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A rarity for documentaries. The movie is a full-tilt farce, and were it not completely true, it'd be a piercing satire that Preston Sturges might have polished into a resonant screwball.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Touching and brisk.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It's a grand outdoor spectacle (the only real interiors are within tents, and those are hard to come by) and a perfectly juicy melodrama.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The filmmaker invites us to reconsider the author as someone warmer and less intimidating than his body of work. On that count, Wrestling With Angels succeeds.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    If Plympton is making pastiche, he's also having a laugh at a universal experience that for a lot of people was probably pretty crummy. Apparently, it was a little crummier for him.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The musician is candid about his own demons and gives the filmmakers access to his wife, two very different daughters, and, for a nicely done montage, his family photographs.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    This intriguing story, like many tales of mid-20th-century American art, is fueled by testosterone.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A sweetly acted and neatly executed social comedy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Amazingly, no one seems steeped in the salubrious self-explication of therapy. They just sound like very good storytellers.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    CJ7
    CJ7 is precisely the 80-something minutes of delirium and cheesy special-effects you'd expect from the man responsible for the chaos of "Shaolin Soccer" and the lunacy of "Kung Fu Hustle."