Wesley Morris

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For 1,826 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Wesley Morris' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Day Night Day Night
Lowest review score: 0 Saving Silverman
Score distribution:
1826 movie reviews
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    For what it’s worth, Tooth Fairy is a somehow dimmer cousin of those Tim Allen “Santa Clause’’ movies.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 12 Wesley Morris
    A moronic exercise in supernatural claptrap.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A rarity for documentaries. The movie is a full-tilt farce, and were it not completely true, it'd be a piercing satire that Preston Sturges might have polished into a resonant screwball.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    It's a tale of two missused Academy Award winners trying to justify their participation in a moribund, noisome redux of any disposable prison movie you care to remember by lobbing Oscar clips at each other.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The deft, hilarious Notting Hill finds Grant's dour-droll-deprecating affliction at its most dead-on.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Never has a movie so soberingly made the fight to save life and the struggle to hold on to it seem so futile.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Boy A comes frustratingly close to succeeding as tragedy.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Very little of it is as persuasive or enveloping as its beloved English counterpart. But it works very hard to distract 11-year-olds from thinking about the November arrival of “The Deathly Hallows.’’
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Too much of Taxi is just tired.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Plays like a holy, erotic mood piece, steeped in so much subdued jungle fever that it practically runs on photosynthesis.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    It's an exasperating exercise in B-movie hokum and screenwriter's gimmickry.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Marshall reveals himself to be a terrific showman of chaos and comic savagery. This is Baz Luhrmann's "Mad Max."
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Considering the sunny, relatively pleasurable romantic business that precedes it, the elderly stuff seems dark, morbid, and forced upon us.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    This sequel, with the return of the first movie's insatiably slutty Los Angeles collegians, is as vulgar as its predecessor and just as almost-smart.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Needs a gritty intervention.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The result is kitschy entertainment that wants to celebrate Lucas's chutzpah and acumen while loosely condemning what they wrought: "Scarface" with a ghost of a conscience.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    When it's funny it's uproarious. Otherwise, you're crestfallen to discover that the movie is a relentless sucker punch to black entrepreneurship.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    A smartly observed, unpretentious, and unconventional comedy of manners -- or more properly, it's a comedy of mannerisms.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    There's enough sexual manic depression to justify house calls from Dr. Laura.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A flyweight, humongously entertaining ensemble number.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Spike Lee has been treading similar terrain with both greater cogency and fewer similarities to Bertolt Brecht. Manderlay, though, is mad and perplexed in its own inscrutable, schematic way. The trouble is the angrier it gets, the more infuriatingly banal it becomes.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The happiest news about the third (and final?) X-Men movie is actually quite sad: headstones. Yes, The Last Stand brings the lamentable deaths of several major characters.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Doesn't have what it takes to be truly terrible.
    • San Francisco Examiner
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    The strip is now a cartoonish sitcom pretending to be a romantic comedy about a drama queen and his adventures in lust. The movie might have gotten away with it, were it interested in romance or comedy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    Shyer's version is a thing of infinite emptiness and nauseating vanity. It's not funny, alluring, affecting, or erotic, just conceited.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A fine film of few words and very little motion.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Simply an endurance contest, one almost worth staying the 82 minutes to see who wins.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    A cheery version of a darker, grislier movie, one in which people like Daniel beat up people like Charlie, girls like Vicky end up in far more compromising positions, and women like Celia turn to Scotch and prescription drugs to cope with their pain.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The filmmakers don't appear to know what's important, let alone how to pace an epic for big drama and maximum thrills.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    What's astonishing is that the movie is not a half-baked production. The spectacle now LOOKS spectacular.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    An undernourished exercise in pop critique.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    lluminating and exceptional docu-portrait.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The film is obviously a long-form episode of a show better digested in 22-minute segments.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    This is a love letter from one auteur to another that doesn't feel like a term paper. Instead, Far From Heaven is an honest-to-God drama with resonance all its own.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    The movie might have worked if it winked more - or if it played things completely straight.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Spellbinding if ponderous.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    They're still fighting in this sequel. But this is a more visually inspired, muscularly made movie than its predecessor.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Like a Bond picture with no spies or villains or car chases or gadgets or explosions.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    Thurman is bespectacled again for Motherhood, and it saddens me to report that neither she nor this comedy turns into more than an argument against procreation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Every moment... is a cleverly constructed live-action joke on aloofness: The world is ending, and these people are too self-centered to notice.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Right up to its deliberate thud of a closer, Polanski had me.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    Stinks from the Earth to the moon.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    A watchful, winding-down tragedy of a movie that delivers what it promises. As commentary, it's grim. As filmmaking, it's a powerfully disturbing odyssey through the Bucharest health care system.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    For most of Lady Vengeance, Park is playing with us. But the jokey atmosphere dissipates and the fun turns inside out in the movie's last act.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    This is a movie that's built around characters the audience is bound to find more insufferable than anyone does in the movie itself.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    The movies are smart -- smarter than you, but not in an off-putting way. Their basic appeal, especially this new one, is that Matt Damon’s killing machine, Jason Bourne, is the cleverest man on earth. And we thrill to his sense of superiority.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The movie's glee is contagious.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    This is an old man's movie, without an old man's experience. Despite McGinly's stated affection for Kreskin (the movie ends with a written appreciation of him), there's nothing personal about it. It's the movie equivalent of handing us a business card.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The movies rarely gives us a woman as fascinatingly complex as Lisbeth Salander, and the happiest news about the two sequels is that she’ll be back.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Disappointing for a number of reasons. For one thing, it's silly. For another, it's not always silly enough to be diverting.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    It has the wild, rancid atmosphere of a garbage bag that a raccoon has ripped open.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    An erotic thriller. It is also an Atom Egoyan picture, which means any claims either to actual eroticism or conventional thrills are theoretical at best.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Really just a lurid potboiler.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    In an eco-horror show that politely masquerades as a documentary, the former vice president effectively warns of man-made cataclysm.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    The most dispiriting thing about Anger Management is that its cameos seem like leftovers.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    Too dumb to realize that the senselessness is viral.
    • San Francisco Examiner
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    Taken? You bet.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Well-meant though it may be, the movie has an advertorial gloss.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    When the film ends, we're haunted. We've been driving with a ghost.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A relentlessly serious action movie, characterized by, of all things, sorrow.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    There's a certain pleasure to be had in some of the physical blowouts.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    As murky and derivative-looking as the film is, it moves with an authority that pummels you into submission.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Gathers a sort of darkness as it comes to its oblique conclusion.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    The movie is also more extraordinary than a mere scenic slideshow.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It’s all lavish, if disposable. But in a nifty change of pace, the warriors in The Warlords are interesting.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Like most of Hallström's Hollywood movies ("The Cider House Rules," "Chocolat"), this one is excruciatingly tasteful.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie is a holiday romantic comedy that wants to put the holiday romantic comedy out of business.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    Maurice Bénichou does the most heartbreaking work in the movie, playing a friend of Georges's. It's a character and a performance I'll have a tough time getting out of my dreams.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    An unremarkable comedy-drama.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 0 Wesley Morris
    P2
    Amid the dumbness and disgust for paying customers, the movie does manage to cough up something I didn't expect: a performance so terrible you can't quite believe it's happening: Bentley's.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Aileen is Broomfield working compassionately. Perhaps it's only because he knows he can't save Wuornos that he can offer her as she might have been: part wounded animal, part self-destructive martyr, and all tragedy.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    The Fourth Kind doesn’t build, instill, or maintain an audience’s fear. It just spends 98 minutes trying to prove that what you’re watching actually happened.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    One of the best things about Nolan as a director is that he’s not self-conscious. His movies unfold and fold in on themselves without the strain of labor or flash. But that lack of self-consciousness is also Nolan’s downside.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    For folks like me, who missed "Firefly," the short-lived TV show on which the movie's based, watching Serenity is like showing up for a big lecture course at the end of the semester. And yet, after an hour of intense disorientation, the movie's arch sarcasm becomes oddly entertaining.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The movie partners all the cliches of the inner-city school drama with the cliches of the dance instructional, and the two keep stomping on each other's toes.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A mixed bag with the promise of a better sequel.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Moon might be a once-in-a-lifetime experience for fans of Sam Rockwell. Will there ever be more of him in one movie than there is here?
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    As documentary, it’s low concept. But it’s never dull.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It’s both ridiculous and ridiculously romantic, which is an apt description of a work shaped like a heart and structured like a pretzel.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A big, lascivious punch line about America's peculiar, embarrassed, hypocritical relationship with sex.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Perry is a playwright, and his dialogue here is usually entertaining.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The Sentinel isn't an entire season of ''24" smushed into a bland two hours of movie? Does Kiefer Sutherland know?
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    A sorry excuse for a ghetto SOS.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Amazingly, Never Let Me Go could have been assembled from the Merchant-Ivory kit. It's stale with suppressed anguish.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    There is a lot to recommend about James' Journey to Jerusalem. Its people are not among them. This searing little parable contains some of the more deplorable folks you're likely to see in a movie about faith.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A hip-hop cousin of Prince's ''Purple Rain,'' which had braver fashion sense and better original songs.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The filmmaker invites us to reconsider the author as someone warmer and less intimidating than his body of work. On that count, Wrestling With Angels succeeds.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    No one here is prodding you to laugh. It just happens.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    This movie can't commit to a genre, let alone a logical sequence or complete idea. But there is a wisdom in its blasé assessments and frivolous air: What's the point; where's the wine?
    • 52 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    So phenomenal that Bill Murray can't even steal it. And he tries. So excellent that Murray's MTV progeny Tom Green can't sink it.
    • San Francisco Examiner
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    At its core, a perceptive satire of the interpersonal boiling points in buddy-cop pictures.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    This is a movie whose cynicism in the name of idealism might have appealed to Billy Wilder.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Written in wisps and watery double-entendres by Heather McGowan and Niels Mueller, and the movie is so benign that its proceedings are beside the point.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    I watched at least a quarter of My Soul to Take, the worst horror movie Wes Craven's made perhaps ever, with the glasses off. It was shot - and is available - in a standard format, and, like many conversions, the 3-D gimmick is like watching a movie through an ashtray.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    Takes one man, his children, their spouses and babies, his ex-wife, his girlfriend, her daughter, and his friends and turns it all into a masterpiece about the strange power of food - to heal, unite, exasperate.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Lopez smiles, whines, and blinks her way through this movie. She seems more relaxed than she ever has. And yet it seems like she’s hiding in romantic comedies, lest we discover that she doesn’t have a “Monster’s Ball’’ or even a “Blind Side’’ in her.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Comes on like an "After School Special'' psychodrama that's been taken off its medication.
    • San Francisco Examiner
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    An enervated adaptation of E.B. White's Stuart Little escapades.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A dinner-from-hell comedy about a pretty Jewish Spaniard who brings a nice Palestinian guy home to her outspoken Madrid family.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It captures a version of our best worst selves.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The movie's queer delight is contagious. You'll exit lip-synching.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    There's nothing really wrong with it -- it's bad, but no worse than it needs to be, which is the problem.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Veronica Guerin hardly trusts you to follow its story, opening with the murder, then a series of titles that explain what's to follow.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 0 Wesley Morris
    Overlong, naggingly pretentious, more absurd than absurdist and a cruel, cruel bore.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    There's a seething moral core in Amores Perros that uses the canine savagery as an entre to human brutality.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    If we are in the midst of a culture war, as many people proclaim in Jesus Camp, then the left should be concerned. The right's Christian soldiers appear to be extremely well trained.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The real core of The Core is the beautiful friendship between a highly emotive Eckhart and the sacrificial Karyo. Their bond is the best thing to happen to Franco-American relations since SpaghettiOs.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Like an old college wrestler, Harris saunters through this toasty little piece of biographical fiction in love with the part's fixins'.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The Treatment fails to do anything interesting with Jake.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    As films about the young and the horny go, I preferred the smarter approach director Jeffrey Blitz takes in "Rocket Science."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    A defective poker comedy where the poker is a lot more interesting than the people playing it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Entertaining.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Queasy comedy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A passable, sometimes skillful farce.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    It's mesmerizing nonetheless for its flagrant disregard for narrative, character, pacing, performance and good lighting.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    When it was over I felt vaguely embarrassed. I wasn't just leaving a movie theater. I was taking a walk of shame.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    It's hard to care about people this generic - even when they're naked.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    As loving and welcome as Chris & Don is, it's not well enough conceived to create equilibrium among its many parts.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 0 Wesley Morris
    It is a traffic jam of broken hearts, fluxing racial identities and deplorable outfits that has everything but a salsa overhaul of "I Will Survive."
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    The director is becoming a master of blending the political and the personal with eloquence and deceptive lightness.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    If Restaurant feels like a high-caliber TV drama, it's one that tries to pack an entire season (plus pilot, plus backstory) into one episode.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Is a truly political stoner movie even possible? The entire point of getting high is to take some of the sting out of life. The movie goes after easy targets and goes soft on the harder issues.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It takes almost an hour for The Legend of Leigh Bowery to make a case for Bowery's sort of genius, and in the last third, the movie gives a real sense of what made him him.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The movie has embarrassingly limited ideas about both the sexes and sex. Like Sandra Bullock’s career woman in “The Proposal,’’ Abby appears to have never heard of intercourse, much less experienced it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Has a novelist's human touch. Were it a book, it would go somewhere on the shelf with Jonathan Safran Foer and early Philip Roth.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    At its best the film serves as a music appreciation class taught by embattled artists whose cloudy livelihoods grow increasingly uncertain with each bittersweet symphony.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    Mike Leigh's great big, superbly performed homage to the creative process.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It's the most touching love story about tragically separated sexy beasts since "Cold Mountain."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    What the writer and director, Lance Daly, means as some kind of transporting urban adventure for them is a disenchanting slog for us.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    A distant thematic and artistic cousin of Sofia Coppola's "The Virgin Suicides" and Lucrecia Martel's "The Holy Girl."
    • 30 Metascore
    • 12 Wesley Morris
    The Unborn joins a growing glut of Holocaust- and Nazi-themed material -- "Valkyrie," "Defiance" - that are long on posturing, suppositions, and righteousness, yet short on moral complexity. Nazism and its crimes have lately inspired theme parks more than actual movies. Too many rides on that roller coaster and I feel sick.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    If it's difficult to find straight laughs in a colorblind prison movie (It's difficult enough to find a colorblind prison movie), finding straight laughs in a black one is almost impossible.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    Who most of these exquisitely costumed people are I have no idea, but they brush past the camera in such rapids of jubilation it's a wonder they don't knock the thing over. I watched most of the film exhilarated, but depressed that I'm not a big Russophile.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    A parody of and winking homage to the history of Thai melodrama, Wisit Sasanatieng's uproarious filmmaking debut exuberantly combines pop and kitsch with a wholesome belief in the thrills of bad art.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    This is not the addictive, hot-wired movie you want.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Not the sweaty midnight stroll through the garden of carnal delights that its title wants you to believe.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    Turns into something like a screwball farce, an intimate, self-aware one.
    • 15 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    This is the sort of movie where men stand blankly over dead loved ones, then start digging. Masculine stoicism or emotional botox? You decide.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    The worst thing about the first Quentin Tarantino picture in five years is that after 93 minutes of some of the most luscious violence and spellbinding storytelling you're likely to see this year, Kill Bill ends.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    What is the value of art in times of strife? Should people be sitting in the theater or rioting in the streets? Walter's film reminds us that once there was a man whose work made no distinction between the two.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The movie has a jolly, half-remembered quality, as though it were adapted from a particularly rose-colored memoir.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    You want the movie to stir your soul, push your intellect, or at the very least, break your heart. But it's such a repetitive and thinly constructed piece of filmmaking that the scope and complexity of Sampedro's case are turned to porridge.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    This is neither a psychological thriller nor an erotic one, so any interest in the story is purely the work of its stars.
    • San Francisco Examiner
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    Comes tantalizingly close to being interesting.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It’s one of the richer movies you’re likely to see about average Arabs in America.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    A collection of beautifully acted encounters, conversations, symbols, and vignettes woven into an evocative and unforgettably surreal garment.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Everybody in the movie is so tightly wound that Walters seems a model of actorly limberness. She cuts through the movie with speed and mannish, zany wit.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Going the Distance earns its R rating, often by daring to say what goes frequently unsaid by women in raunchy comedies. It's not a very good movie. The entire second half is a sitcom.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The movie star Julie Christie turned 62 last month, and anyone under the impression that she merely floated through her prime heedless of the age in which she worked should catch her in A Decade Under the Influence.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    There's a cheap thrill in watching Hudson defuse Cook's pig antics with some foulness of her own.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It’s as slickly enjoyable as anything you’d see on VH1.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Schwartzberg does stumble upon some pretty fascinating people.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Feels like an interminable pilot for a show to fill that deadly 8:30 slot between "Friends" and "Will and Grace."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The screenplay's intelligence begins to break down in Egoyan's formal choices. Ideas never elude Egoyan, but boy does Saroyan's epic look uncertain and cruddy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The documentary is primarily a work of whimsy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Shattered Glass, with its dumb title, is smart about good vs. evil. Incidentally, the good is Lane, who now works at The Washington Post and was a consultant on this picture.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    At once a stifling exercise in thwarting emotional dynamics and a heated invitation to engage in the film's discourse on the shortcoming of sexual politics and justice in a media-saturated land.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Robert Downey Jr. looks as hung over in Iron Man 2 as he seemed drunk in “Iron Man.’’ He does his share of drinking this time, too. And the sequel makes more out of his insobriety. It has an early stretch where it fizzes and slurs, with the stars stepping on each other’s lines and feet. The movie feels drunk, too.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    With Election, Payne announces himself as one of the keenest purveyors of the scattered pieces that once was an American morality.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The early dilemma in "Rise of the Silver Surfer " is this: Save the world or marry Jessica Alba . Your conscience says, "Save the world." But the Maxim reader in you knows better.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Rendition is a reminder that, in the wrong hands, political outrage can be a slog.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    Brilliantly named Half Past Dead -- or for Seagal pessimists: ''Totally Past His Prime.''
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The scenes between Montgomery and Stone in plainclothes would seem to be tangential to Moverman's movie, but they're very much its point. Only in uniform do these men make sense to themselves.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    It’s network television drama, starring actors best known for their TV work and full of the petty gripes and mild worries of characters who really have nothing compelling to worry about.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The opportunity to see what Lollobrigida could do with a crooked smile or a roll of her eyes -- let alone a simple street dress -- is well worth the price of entry.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The movie is as modestly unpretentious as David O. Russell's "Spanking the Monkey."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's a slow, moderately involving descent into the inevitable, with Pearce gamely trying to figure what's going on. Better him than me.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    It has no pulse, no apparent breath.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The first half of The Heart of Me is just that sort of hoot. You know where it's all headed, and you can't wait for it to get there, as the cheap, cruel ironies pile up almost farcically.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    Just bland behavioral propaganda, and Holmes makes such a guileless and robotic spokeswoman, it wouldn't be nuts to think the White House was just another mansion in Stepford.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    "Wolverine" feels enslaved to its many masters - Marvel Comics, Hollywood, and the young men who devour their products - never sidestepping the déjà vu it inspires.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    Just Like Heaven suggests that a post-coma Elizabeth might understand what life is truly all about. Of course, if being alive means having to live in this movie, maybe she was better off the way she was.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Never has this war been filmed with such ragged glory.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    Comes on as both a rebuke to male vanity and a chic metaphor for midlife panic.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    We're left with the painful reality that Paycheck might get Alfred Hitchcock, but it certainly doesn't know Philip K. Dick.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    What an amazing presence Gorintin has. Never mind her hunched back and white hair, she's no crone. She makes Eka needy for happiness but susceptible to heartbreak. It's a great performance, full of both joy and the quiet, disappointing parts of being alive that come with knowing change is part of life.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Lawrence just leans on Grant and Bullock, who could have done a movie this breezy from the set of their next one -- where, presumably, Bullock will be playing Medea.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    In a summer in which every blockbuster is zealous to be a video game, Rodriguez, with a wink, has produced his own.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    Just as I was beginning to hope that she’d (Heigl) find a part that called for intelligence and sophistication and backbone, she plays another uptight naif.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It does manage to put a somewhat complex human face on the domestic troublemakers, if not their exploits.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Crassly funny passages.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    All the gears, in fact, are shamelessly visible, yet they lock smoothly and resonantly into place. If Akeelah and the Bee is a generic, well-oiled commercial contraption, it is the first to credibly dramatize the plight of a truly gifted, poor black child.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 0 Wesley Morris
    Another "Exorcist" bastard -- one with a chick-flick pedigree.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    Barbara Kopple and Cecilia Peck's film is a fascinating look at the intersection of commerce, celebrity, and controversy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Medea works on von Trier's own imagistic terms. There are shots and sequences in this movie that feel unique.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    You don't have to hand the folks behind Dragon Wars much (the acting, directing, costumes, editing, props, music, etc: They're all off). But when they decide to sic that giant snake and those prehistoric dino-birds on downtown Los Angeles, the movie turns shockingly watchable.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It's neither a neat little allegory about faith nor a transcendently entertaining one. I Am Legend is actually about the last man on earth played by one of the last real movie stars on earth. To be honest, Smith was all I was thinking about while I sat through I Am Legend.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    To say the least, the film is awkward, like a piece of badly assembled Ikea furniture. Still, editor Bernadine Colish weaves together all that C-SPAN footage into a disturbing procedural indictment. Legislators use the same language - often the president's - to justify the rush to war. The repetition is comical until it's scary: They're parroting.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    [Cuaron]'s a visionary and crafty storyteller who rewards your patience, not with twists in the plot, though the movie has its share, but with pure feeling. Deploying wit, grace, and artistry, he's whisked a kid flick into adolescence.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    Part sketch-comedy cartoon, part Cracked magazine spoof, installment four is the most scornfully made yet.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Showing up for Molière eager for the story of one of the theater's greatest comedy writers would be unwise. It's not that kind of party.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The movie's few false notes come from Lumet's script, which can be overly explanatory. Because Demme is opting for present-tense realism, the characters are forced to fill us in on who did what when to whom, why, and how.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    In the end, it's hard to see a real reason for the movie's existence. We already have Muppets.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Woo delivers a vintage breakneck, break-arm, break-face 20-minute finale.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    Boys Don't Cry's intensity sneaks up on you like a snake.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The message is clear almost immediately: charity not vanity.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    Nothing about this movie works, not the title (it used to be called "Clubland "), not Blethyn's attempt to inject comedy into her rickety stereotype of a character.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Of course, there's little else of interest about Pokemon beyond the consumption factor. Buy more.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    A righteous but wrongheaded thriller, chokes on its well-meant outrage and leaves a moth-eaten plot and handful of nonsense characters on its way to a dopey finish.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Doesn't have its heroine's conviction. It'd be better if it had.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    It's a resplendently basic, lovey- dovey and inside-out "King Lear."
    • 31 Metascore
    • 12 Wesley Morris
    Tens of millions of dollars were spent to tell us what we should have known going in: that the makers of the movie you're slogging through will spare no expense to demonstrate how much they hate us. Do us a favor. Tell them the feeling is mutual.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A fascinating, sometimes profound curiosity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    While the picture isn't brilliant, it is, at its most entertaining, a kicky, surprisingly astute throwback to bygone Hollywood social comedies.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    This is many lousy movies for the price of one.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Technically outstanding and the performances are strong.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    There's gangsta rap with funnier insights into the opposite sex.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A crafty, sometimes craven, but hardly worshipful snapshot of an unlikely candidate for biggest rock act on earth.
    • San Francisco Examiner
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    In James Marsh's The King, the usually wonderful Gael Garcia Bernal is all wrong for the role of Elvis Valderez.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    If even half of Olivier Dahan's robust film about Piaf's life is true -- and let's face it, much remains shrouded in myth and mystery -- it's a wonder she could get dressed in the morning, let alone forge a legendary singing career.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    After a sensuous introductory act, The Reader descends into a series of dismaying contradictions regarding the moral toxins of the Holocaust - which still pollute postwar Germany.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    A masterpiece.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Pedro is what a friend of mine calls a ''macho Iberico," which refers to a certain type of cocky, insensitive Spanish man.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    As entertaining, charming and conceited as other Robert Redford joints, but it's also insufferably obvious.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Perry shelves his crowd-pleasing Madea character and aspires for the impossible mix of 1950s social melodrama, gospel-inflected public service announcement, soap opera, R&B video, girl-centric sitcom on the CW, and any episode of "Good Times," featuring Janet Jackson's oft-affronted Penny. Were Perry a visual director or a logical, patient screenwriter, that hybrid would count as a feat of singular ambition. Instead, it seems like the product of an abbreviated attention span.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    What begins as unassumingly dull wanders into disarming chaos.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Even if some of the references are inscrutable, a lot of 8 Women is a riot. Here and there Ozon finds the key to a level of farce that would have amused Bunuel himself.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    The film's central drama is not between the former secretary and the filmmaker. It's between McNamara and history.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    Ultimately, Bingenheimer seems underwhelmed with himself. The people who know him say, in the movie, that he's a relic. Mayor of the Sunset Strip makes heartbreakingly clear what a glorious relic Bingenheimer is.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Implausibly dainty.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    While Lane is her typical winning self, the film is mawkish. The more we're cajoled to root for Sarah Nolan, the divorced preschool teacher she plays, the more Must Love Dogs stops resembling a movie and starts feeling like a greeting card.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    The fun of these movies is that Linney often seems too refined for such greasy junk, but there she is anyway, hamming it down as it were.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The movie's not bad enough to be world-ending, merely clumsy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Frustratingly, Carnahan barely trusts his storytelling to keep our attention long enough to get through a scene without some grisly cutaway -- a gun to the head, the writhing wounded.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The appeal of Bedtime Stories belongs entirely to Sandler. As a comedian, he doesn't have to stoop to a kid's level. He's usually already there.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's the tone of the movie's two sides - action and stillness, graphic violence and romantic melodrama - that don't cohere.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A jokey, junky potboiler.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The problem with the new movie is the same as with the previous one. Vardalos has this idea that she's a marm. And while it's true that she personifies her movies, I don't quite buy her librarian mode.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    The 6-year-old I went with had the villain pegged in the first 15 minutes. Needless to say, she completely ruined the movie for me. Meddling kid.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Touching and brisk.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    Too screwy to be really funny.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Sensationalism and doom are not on screen here; Jacquot offers a relatively peaceful moment in Sade's life.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A cult classic is born.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    Proves acutely subtle. But its question of what we forgive art in the face of atrocity and immorality is one for the ages.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    A milestone of eloquent understatement that captures the daily life of have-nots as few American movies have.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    This is that rare art flick whose subject goes nuts because his work is not self-indulgent ENOUGH.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The first 30 or so minutes of Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story condense the entire Hollywood biopic genre into a sweet chewable tablet. It's the Flintstones vitamin of spoofs.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Delivers chunks of ''Yellow Submarine'' and ''The Phantom Tollbooth'' -- a vividly timeless oddity suitable for many children and most stoners.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    By nearly every measure, Milk is a beautifully made, far less conventional movie biography than most.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    While the story couldn't be simpler and the filmmaking is crude, it forcefully addresses a reality.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    By the time I saw poor Tim crushed, head to toe, by a falling sheet of plate glass, I was certain I hadn't signed up for anything this punishing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A romantic comedy with film noir shadows.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The movie begins to run out of gas as it racks up a body count, but even the mad-scientist and I-created-a-monster clichés are contorted satisfyingly enough.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Just as exciting and socially vivid as Bielinsky's. Yet, somehow it's more stressful. The American characters practically sweat desperation.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Like a guy who finally gets what he wants, you just want to go home once it's over.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    This mangy comedy only demonstrates that Lohan's star power is too bright for falling into mounds of mud, rooting around in cat litter for a contact lens, and getting punched out by a roughneck jailbird, as she does here.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Dogtooth is slightly less self-congratulatory than the average Dogme movie, a few of which belong to Lars von Trier. This feels, instead, more like an extreme summer at a Dadaist acting camp.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    A pure Frankenstein flick -- ugly, profane, terror-inducing, clumsy, nasty, desperate, stupid, contemptible, horny and brought to life by schlocky, shoddy science and an electric wish to prove that its makers still matter.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Fails to match the philosophical and acting bounties of 1996's ''First Contact.'' Baird has seen to it that the Enterprise's being under fire still amounts to the crew rocking back and forth, gripping the railings as the ship's phasers are down to 4 percent.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The movie is as inconsequentially pleasant as its star, and far nicer than the title lets on, too.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    An edgy, hypnotic entertainment that's like a Club Med production of "Lord of the Flies."
    • San Francisco Examiner
    • 83 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The film is so immersed in Roberts's life that it becomes easy to think that most of what the camera sees is also from her perspective. It's actually too seamless.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    Harwood's screenplay obscures any sort of philosophical, religious, or historical considerations in favor of pulpy and faith-bruising sensationalism.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Rohmer's style saps the film of the drama that flows directly from the subject matter.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    A flavorless family-friendly action-adventure that doubles as memory exploitation. It has nothing to do with either the Mickey Mouse broom sequence of the same name from 1940's "Fantasia'' or the 213-year-old Goethe poem that inspired it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    As an ad for the city's charms, Paris couldn't have asked for a more sweetly jaundiced love letter.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    Oasis is that rare miraculous whirlwind romance that moves from attempted rape to reverence without kicking up a lot of dust.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The World Is Not Enough, like a 19th version of anything, is inanely self-parodic. So much so that one wonders why Austin Powers need have bothered in the first place.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Piercingly co-written and directed by Susanne Bier, the movie dramatizes one man's collapse and the other's surprising maturation.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Blame the unsexy subject matter if you want, but blame the uninspired casting first.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    Brutally dumb canine comedy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Norton is unapologetic and unflappable in his part. Slimy and vaguely nerdy, he's become the thinking man's thug, even if this character's Armani-wear is better tailored than his psychology.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    It's more like a cartoon with a body count.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Before an hour has passed tedium overtakes Black Dynamite - one corny martial-arts sequence turns out to be plenty - and all the good jokes dry up.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Not horrifying enough.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    A depressing piece of gun-crazy Hollywood scuzz that, with its gassy style and runaway immorality, makes a Tony Scott movie look like a Robert Bresson picture.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    300
    There's a stale, synthetic airlessness about the movie. Imagine a large cast trapped in a series of spectacular screensavers. It could be ancient Greece. It could be somebody's hard drive.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    Awash in strangeness, a poem that details what it's like to be 13 at the end of a millennium.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    This is one of those your-roots-are-showing family circuses where just about everybody seems like a clown.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Sings in the key of life.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    Watching [Berry] run around in that getup I felt embarrassed, the way I do for people who put on makeup before climbing a StairMaster -- it's too much.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Phyllis and Harold is really about Phyllis and how discontent has a way of spilling, then spreading. Kleine never quite says so, but her mother’s life was a tragedy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    Szabo doesn't bring the film to its senses until just past the halfway point.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    Segues from the merely quirky into the bizarrely unthinkable.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    Meanders around Holly Springs, Mississippi, with the fuzzy benevolence of a Hallmark Hall of Fame presentation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie is only so-so, borrowing a little from the VH-1 school of popumentary but lacking the snazzy production values.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Watching the uncertain and disappointing new apartheid documentary Amandla! A Revolution in Four-Part Harmony'' is like going to the lecture of an impassioned but really disorganized professor.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    This is less an affront to women than it is to comedy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    The movie's narrative can be taxingly ornate, but there's something beautiful about its metaphorical conflation of politics and glamour, the real and the fictional.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    This is a corny tale, told with both generous helpings of deli-sliced cheese and a brief stretch of chilling tumultuousness.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 12 Wesley Morris
    At its least intolerable, the movie is a fatherhood freak-out.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    This low-rent, nonsense cop business filled me with a nostalgic twinge. I didn't know I wanted the "Police Academy" series resurrected with a lot more hilarity, but I'm glad somebody did it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 38 Wesley Morris
    A powerful film of suffering and sacrifice and desperation. But it's vacuous, banal, and, where its mix of sentiment and grisliness is concerned, rather despicable.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Amazingly, no one seems steeped in the salubrious self-explication of therapy. They just sound like very good storytellers.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Sayles seems to be trying, single-handedly, to correct centuries of First World self-centeredness in Third World contexts.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    An infuriatingly indulgent piffle of adolescent wish-fulfillment.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    More often than not the film casts an infectious, evocative spell.
    • San Francisco Examiner
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    Raimi, who shares script credit with his brother Ivan and Alvin Sargent, strikes an exquisite balance between pop and woe, drama and whooshing adventure.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The movie's banal fantasies badly chafe any anthropological consideration of what a girl should do with her career. This isn't life. It's Lifetime.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The movie pits fortune against destiny and has an enigmatic old time splitting the difference.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Wesley Morris
    It's the rawest, most hot-blooded, provocatively audacious, dangerous movie to come of out Hollywood this year.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Wesley Morris
    The 70-something director puts us back in luxury's lap with Roman de Gare, which looks just like the high-roller ads you get in the first 40 pages of Vogue or Vanity Fair but feels vaguely more emotional. Lelouch wants to tie a Hermès scarf around our hearts.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Wesley Morris
    A tidy soap opera. But it's a discreet, warmly made one, too. In a show of restraint, the intrigue never rises above mildly juicy.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Wesley Morris
    Material this banal needs a madman of David Lynch proportions to incinerate it. Hackford leaves it intact, forcing us to regard a car he doesn't have the guts or skill to crash.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    It feels like a trumped up trifle, disinterested in narrative exercises, using instead technique (cinematography, editing and, omigod, a soundtrack!) to swing moods and heighten reality, then send it crashing to earth.

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