For 107 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 77% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

William Goss' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Before Midnight
Lowest review score: 25 21 and Over
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 66 out of 107
  2. Negative: 4 out of 107
107 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 William Goss
    Fiennes and writer Abi Morgan mercifully forsake the gee-golly traditions of similar fame-minded fare...in constructing a narrative as emotionally repressed as its subjects must have been, with each character existing within their own arena of personal and social compromise.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 William Goss
    Philomena honors its namesake by valuing potent understatement over potential hysterics.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 77 William Goss
    Not as touching or boldly transgressive as its ultra-violent peers.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 77 William Goss
    Jason Reitman’s adaptation of Joyce Maynard’s Labor Day is as consistently assured a piece of filmmaking as any we’ve seen from the filmmaker and very much in keeping with the decreasingly glib nature of his output.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 76 William Goss
    If the Favreau-written “Swingers” concerned itself with the pursuit of meaningful romance and the Favreau-directed “Made” tackled the pursuit of a better living, then the slight if continually amusing Chef is clearly his paean to rekindling one’s passions, whether as an artist, a husband or a father.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 William Goss
    Despite its apparent compromises to noble finger-wagging (initially) and requisite fist-pumping (eventually), Waugh has fashioned a sturdy character-first entertainment out of Snitch at a time of year when those are all too rare to behold.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 William Goss
    Faxon and Rush’s screenplay doesn’t deviate too far from formula, but their sturdy direction, bolstered by handsome production values, evokes a wistful sense of carefree summers and conjures up a potent amount of simmering teenage angst beneath the frequent chuckles.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 William Goss
    John Dies at the End is easily funnier than it is scary, and much like the drug at the center of the story, it offers one hell of a trip.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 William Goss
    The downright gnarliest mainstream horror release in recent memory, Evil Dead is certainly a considerable and occasionally commendable dose of the ol’ ultra-violence, but Fede Alvarez’ Raimi-sanctioned update of 1981’s cult favorite only really has that demented determination going for it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 William Goss
    A funny, sly directorial debut
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 William Goss
    The beats and trappings are all standard-issue, but the gags are funny enough, often enough, to offset such routine proceedings.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 William Goss
    Forever doesn't deviate terribly from the can-we-be-friends-after-sex playbook, but it rarely opts for hysterics or contrivance to push our leads along, so long as you can swallow the amicability with which they initially divorce.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 William Goss
    Fans of Birbiglia should be easily entertained, and with a little luck, it will only earn this particular loveable neurotic a few more of those.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 William Goss
    Each scene is a brisk vignette of deadpan reversal, often involving a running theme of miscommunication.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 William Goss
    A noir-tinged, noose-tightening ordeal [that] confirms Antonio Campos, if not the entire Borderline Films outfit, as a filmmaker/team to be reckoned with.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 William Goss
    What really sells both the fashionable remove and generational paralysis is the pairing of Elliott and McNulty, as they effortlessly establish a passive-aggressive relationship from the get-go that thrives in a constant state of reliably unreliable codependence.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 74 William Goss
    Two Buckleys for the price of one, but the real star here is Penn Badgley.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 73 William Goss
    While hardly insightful as a character study, Tracks can’t help but flourish as an Aussie travelogue, with cinematographer Mandy Walker doing justice to these vast and harsh environments.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 72 William Goss
    The film itself is sly and smug in kind, fleetingly enjoyable for all of its old-school showmanship and high-tech hokiness.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 William Goss
    As the rare overlap between music doc and advocacy piece, Musicwood is hopeful about a relatively unsung issue without necessarily being naïve.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 68 William Goss
    Ultimately seems at war with itself, torn between its duties as an entertaining, engaging movie and a somber, sincere memorial, and in splitting the difference, the film effectively assaults its audience almost as aggressively as its subjects.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 68 William Goss
    This long-distance love story is comfort food in any language, perfectly agreeable and unlikely to surprise.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 William Goss
    We’re given fairly straightforward talking-head accounts complemented with an increasing amount of archival material as the narrative progresses further towards the present, all coated in a VH1-suited slickness that belies the reported funk of the studio itself. Fortunately, that slickness is in service of tales from some substantial musicians.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 William Goss
    From the concept on down, Cronenberg’s film inevitably resembles the ‘80s body horror with which father David made his name, but Brandon brings his own antiseptic eye to this queasy noir mutation, like “D.O.A.” for a self-serving near-future.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 William Goss
    Glaringly indebted to several earlier works and the film overall remains beholden to one established brand above all others: Tom Cruise.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 William Goss
    Wish You Were Here goes to a dramatically gripping place of guilt and doubt; if only its grip had held just a bit tighter.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 William Goss
    It’s minor LaBute, but nonetheless short and bittersweet.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 67 William Goss
    It's easy to take most films' war-torn elsewheres for granted, and taken on its own merits, Red Dawn is a victory of small battles and heavy artillery, sentimental but rarely too hackneyed, energetic without becoming too silly.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 66 William Goss
    Maniac is a bit like watching an amputee play hopscotch: there’s no way that it’s polite to stare for this long, but you just have to see if this guy’s gonna make it to the end.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 66 William Goss
    It’s the odd touch of local color — like the backdrop of an abandoned amusement park, or the arrival of a Civil War steamer crewed by Confederate zombies — that makes these routine acts of derring-do a bit easier to bear.

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