Metascore
75

Generally favorable reviews - based on 27 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 17 out of 27
  2. Negative: 0 out of 27
  1. 100
    It's a beast-changing, head-slapping, jaw-ripping brawler with attitude and style and sex - always a good combination.
  2. A graphically superb experience with solid, although not as detailed fighting controls.
  3. The near endless replay value of searching out new and original juggle combos is alone almost enough to warrant a purchase.
  4. With astonishing new graphics, and a rock solid gameplay style that is mostly untouched from the previous games, Primal Fury was worth the wait.
  5. If you are looking for a standard fighter for your Gamecube, then this is your only option. Keep in mind though that there are far better fighters for other systems.
  6. The AI within the game will tax most gamers, event the fight fans among you.
  7. The actual game play in Bloody Roar isn't as deep as say, VF4, but on the flipside, it's a game that's easy to pick up and play. Though you certainly won't beat the game by being a button-masher.
  8. Besides the unique zoanthropic morphing, this release won't do much for hardcore fighting fanatics, but as I've said before, it's a great release for newcomers to the ring. [Apr 2002, p.78]
  9. 80
    It's instantly accessible, but lacks the depth and attention to detail that would give it any real longevity...[but] significantly better than BR3 on the PS2. [Apr 2002, p.106]
  10. The control is very fun and initiative, but does lack variety in the move sets.
  11. It's good but lacks having any special feel. It's got all the ingredience of a fighter that we have all grown towards and learnt to love.
  12. Impressive graphics, a simple yet pleasant combat system and multiplayer fun balance out the issues of sound and gameplay depth.
  13. 78
    In terms of gameplay, longevity and room for growth, however, Bloody Roar: Primal Fury just doesn't have the legs to compare to the likes of Sega's "Virtua Fighter" series or Namco's "Tekken" and "Soul Calibur" games.
  14. 77
    It's a lot of fun to play -- tight control mixed with a fair amount of moves and combos (but not enough), and then the strategic element of beast transformations, proves very addictive.
  15. If you've played Virtua Fighter so many times that you can win a fight with your eyes closed, then I recommend buying Guilty Gear XX, but if you are a die hard 3D fighter fan, then you may as well try this one, if only as a rent.
  16. Thanks to the new backgrounds, improved graphics, extra characters and loads of unlockable goodies it almost seems like a semi-sequel to BR 3.
  17. It might not have the depth as some of the other fighting games, but it's still fun.
  18. It certainly looks great, and it can be fun.
  19. Despite lacking in the depth found in more established fighters, Bloody Roar: Primal Fury is a complete blast to play.
  20. It does have...a kung-fu penguin! And what's cooler than that?
  21. Feverishly pressing on a D-pad the size of a piece of Lucky Charms get tiring quickly. [Apr 2002, p.137]
  22. The appeal of over-the-top effects, non-interactive finishing moves, and buxom ladies has a short expiration date. If you're a fan of the franchise, then this is the best Roar yet.
  23. If you're the type to enjoy that style of gameplay, we're honour-bound to point out "Super Smash Brothers: Melee," a superior game in about all aspects, and with infinitely more to do.
  24. A fresh look, but this prizefighting animal is still a few hairballs away from becoming a champion.
  25. Put simply, BRPF thrives on button mashing. For those unfamiliar with the term, this means that even the most skilled player can fall victim to a first-timer's frenzied and haphazard button presses.
  26. A graphical powerhouse, Bloody Roar offers action that's a bit too basic to be a knockout. [Apr 2002, p.147]
User Score
8.6

Generally favorable reviews- based on 18 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 11
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 11
  3. Negative: 0 out of 11
  1. Apr 29, 2013
    10
    This is one of my favorite games on the Gamecube system.

    The first thing that drew my attention to this game were the graphics. They look
    very good, even today. It has a very polished look, from the interface to the detailed characters. The biggest achievement is that the game manages to capture an anime look for its characters without using a cartoony style.

    For some reason, though, the game wasn't very popular at the time of its launch. Part of this was a timing issue, I believe. The Gamecube was still new and everybody was expecting a lot of innovation.

    It's true that it can be difficult even for me to find people that are willing to play the game with me. There are primarily two things that cause this reaction.

    The first one is that there are big differences between the characters. Characters tend to have their advantages and weaknesses. If you select a character at random, it might behave in particular ways that can cause some confusion. The way the game was meant to be played is to start with the characters in the order they were listed in the menu. Start with Yugo and Alice and so on these "starter" characters tend to have covered all areas, with moves for all situations. Only after you become comfortable with them move onto characters such as Uriko and Ganesha, which are more specialized.

    The second issue that seems to confuse new players is that the game is very combo-oriented. If you connect moves in the proper order, you can unleash a chain of 17 hits that seem impossible to stop. So it can be quite frustrating for the other player, as he presses buttons and realizes that he cannot do much during a combo. The game becomes very fun once your adversary learns to string combos too.

    All in all, it is a very good product. Especially considering that it wasn't developed by a huge team with fabulous budgets.
    Full Review »
  2. Mar 17, 2012
    8
    [Spanish] Bloody Roar es un juego de peleas que nos va a dejar con la boca abierta, tanto por lo destruibles de su escenario como por su simplicidad, es el típico juego que es fácil de aprender pero dificil de dominar.... recomendado para los amantes de la lucha :D Full Review »
  3. TrustMeK
    Nov 6, 2007
    10
    It's 2007 and I've had this came since it came out on the gamecube. An awesome game..very underrated. It's still my favourite fighting game. I have soul calibur II as well but I personally reckon bloody roar is so much more fun. The gameplay is much more arcade like and there is more satisfaction from connecting moves and hits in this game than in soul calibur II because they're fast, furious and just feel really insanely strong. The character and their moves feel REALLY strong in comparison to soul calibur II which basically involves weapons most of the time. Weapons don't have that same feeling of power that you get from connecting punches and kicks in crazy combos. Beast mode makes the game even more intense because it makes you feel absolutely monster strong. I also like the stages where things smash up and floors in the levels break away to another level. Things like that make the game feel much more arcade like. The music isn't bad...it has that kind of retro 90's rock sound to it. As 'Diehard Critic' stated, this game is by no means a shallow button mashing game. There is a lot of skill involved in connecting combos and dodging your opponents. If anything, Soul Calibur II is EASILY more of a button mashing game. The only complaint I have of Bloody Roar is the box art cover (lol). Out of all people they had to have Jenny (the bat) on the cover. They could have chosen someone cooler or hotter but had to choose her...she looks like a witch. Another fighting game on the Gamecube which doesn't compare to Bloody Roar is Mortal Kombat Deadly Alliance. I bought it and sold it cause it was pretty crap. Horrible graphics and character movement/animation and limited (awful) moves. Overall, I honestly and personally still believe that Bloody Roar is the best fighter on the Gamecube. Hope they make a sequel for the Wii. Full Review »