Metascore
81

Generally favorable reviews - based on 16 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 14 out of 16
  2. Negative: 0 out of 16
  1. 89
    If it's an incredible single-player mode packed full of spy gadgetry, stealthy missions, clever mission objectives and outstanding graphics that you're after, you can't do better than this Eurocom shooter, even if it does fall a little short in the AI and multiplayer departments.
  2. An engaging experience but fails to match the gameplay finesse of "GoldenEye."
  3. 90
    Doesn't quite surpass the gameplay standard set by the recent "Perfect Dark," but it does have better audio and the graphics are a notch above its predecessor, "GoldenEye."
  4. It has an awesome single player experience, decent multiplayer, steady frame rate and an extensive array of weapons and gadgets.
  5. If there weren't so many better games of the same ilk, I'd definitely recommend this one. But there are, and TWINE isn't at the top of the stack.
  6. Its simplified approach and cool cinematic feel of the single player mode will whisk you away in no time at all.
  7. (Da Gameplay is) genius' I tell you. 007 is pure magic.
  8. A great game, but it's never going to replace "Goldeneye" or "Perfect Dark." Both games do things bigger and better and more often.
  9. There are only about three really great N64 first-person shooters, and this is one of those three.
  10. The pace of the action is generally heart pounding, and that's a good thing. On the down side, the missions are either too short or too initially implausible.
  11. A passable shooter that will please Nintendo-owning fans of the genre, but it won't win any awards for originality, ingenuity or design.
  12. If "GoldenEye" was the Sean Connery of Bond games, and "Tomorrow Never Dies" was George Lazenby, then The World Is Not Enough is a likable Roger Moore--showing its age, in it for the money, and prone to bouts of slowdown, but still sporting that old Bond magic.
  13. Eurocom does the amazing by putting out a sequel to Rare's "Goldeneye" that actually lives up to the high standard set for it. What a shame that Rare's own pseudo-sequel, "Perfect Dark," already did the same thing at least twice better.
  14. 80
    An excellent homage to "GoldenEye" -- it doesn't really have anything in the way of new ideas but in some ways it's a more enjoyable single player game than "Perfect Dark."
  15. TWINE revels in fact that it poaches the concepts pioneered in GoldenEye, and N64 gamers should too, because we haven't had it this good since 1997.
  16. A well-crafted FPS that will satisfy the majority of bloodbath-seeking N64 fans. Its general entertainment value vaults TWINE into the upper echelon of N64 first-person shooters.
User Score
7.6

Generally favorable reviews- based on 22 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 9 out of 14
  2. Negative: 1 out of 14
  1. Aug 14, 2012
    7
    I felt that this game was great for the N64, and had several significant improvements over Goldeneye 007--though for numerous reasons I never enjoyed it quite as much overall. The single player has a MUCH more pronounced story, complete with voiced cutscenes, and follows the movie a bit more closely than the previous game. It introduces alternate fire modes for weapons (like Perfect Dark), as well as several gadgets, and while many of the weapons are not as iconic as Goldeneye's, there is a much better diversity and balance. Where this game really shines is multiplayer, which offers more game modes, weapon sets, and character models than its predecessor, as well as the option for AI bots (which are great for practice or rounding out a 3-player session. Full Review »
  2. Aug 16, 2012
    6
    007 suffers from GoldenEye envy and Rare definitely has EA beat on this one. However, 007: The World is Not Enough is still a decent first-person shooter, with a wide variety of weapons and entertaining game-play. The more magic experience would go to GoldenEye, but if you were remotely a fan of that game, The World is Not Enough still has a lot to offer you. Full Review »