Analogue: A Hate Story PC

User Score
7.9

Generally favorable reviews- based on 98 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 74 out of 98
  2. Negative: 11 out of 98

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  1. Jan 7, 2014
    7
    I don’t usually enjoy these types of games, but I liked this one. It’s sort of like an interactive mystery novel with pictures (be prepared for a lot of reading). The reason I liked it is because the story is, shockingly, pretty interesting. It also introduces enough game elements to prevent it from being nothing more than a pure text adventure and the length is just right.

    You play the
    I don’t usually enjoy these types of games, but I liked this one. It’s sort of like an interactive mystery novel with pictures (be prepared for a lot of reading). The reason I liked it is because the story is, shockingly, pretty interesting. It also introduces enough game elements to prevent it from being nothing more than a pure text adventure and the length is just right.

    You play the part of a salvager who is trying to uncover what happened on a derelict generation ship, which is one of the theorized ways humans might be able to explore the galaxy. The way this story goes is how I think such an attempt would end in real life, too (I’ll stop here before revealing any spoilers).

    There are different levels of depth to be discovered to the story as well as multiple endings. What you uncover depends on what questions you ask and how deep you dig. The game is also timed, in a way, so that after a certain point certain endings become impossible depending on what you’ve done so far. Thankfully, the game’s length is paced excellently so right around the time you are getting tired of reading the text, you’ll find yourself near the end. You’re also able to speed through much of the text on subsequent playthroughs to see different endings, which is nice.

    I liked the music a lot, too. It sets a very appropriate mood throughout the story. I played this with headphones on and I’d recommend that. It greatly increases the immersive feel as this game is best enjoyed with a couple of hours blocked out and no distractions to take you away from it, not unlike reading a book.

    Is it worth $10, though? That’s a tough call and will depend on just how much you like this sort of thing. It will only take you 2-3 hours to get through this and considerably less to view the alternate endings, if you even care about doing that. And once you beat it, there is little reason to play through it again. I bought it during a Steam sale, though, and am content with what I paid for it.

    I will say that the music and writing are above average and the artwork is well done. This is essentially an adventure game that removes all of the pointing & clicking and walking around aimlessly through the same maps. To me, that is a good thing.
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  2. Jan 24, 2013
    7
    This is a very cool little visual novel type game. As a player, you search through a computer database, read e-mails, and learn about the history of a spaceship and the people that used to live on it. There is a lot to read, and the story is quite good, with some exciting twists and turns along the way. I wouldn't rank this as one of my favourite novels, though, and given that it isThis is a very cool little visual novel type game. As a player, you search through a computer database, read e-mails, and learn about the history of a spaceship and the people that used to live on it. There is a lot to read, and the story is quite good, with some exciting twists and turns along the way. I wouldn't rank this as one of my favourite novels, though, and given that it is mostly a novel (in video game clothing), I've come up with a score that reflects this. Expand
  3. Apr 27, 2012
    5
    I almost bought this game JUST to give it a bad review on steam. I was playing this game at my friend's house because he was trying to tell me how good it was, so I started playing, and my god. This is soooooo slow. I'm sure there's someone out there that will LOVE this game, but it is definitely not my cup of tea. I give it a 5 because it's good at what it does, it's just not my style.
  4. Sep 4, 2013
    7
    For what it's worth, this is a very good Visual Novel that has a few problems that arise from being a game. The story is excellent, but definitely on the depressing side. It's wonderfully done and the A.I's that accompany you on the journey were excellently written. The issue arises with the override terminal that's in the game. If you don't have some idea on how to already use a computerFor what it's worth, this is a very good Visual Novel that has a few problems that arise from being a game. The story is excellent, but definitely on the depressing side. It's wonderfully done and the A.I's that accompany you on the journey were excellently written. The issue arises with the override terminal that's in the game. If you don't have some idea on how to already use a computer terminal in this way, you definitely will have issues, like I did, especially in the later stages of the game where you must use the thing in order to advance in the game with a time limit. It's frustrating and annoying and something that definitely didn't need to be there. If this game was more along the lines of it's sequel, Hate Plus, it would have been alot better. But the fact that there's an element to give it more of a game feel ironically makes it a worse game than it should have been. Still a good game and worth the 10 dollars I spent on it. But that terminal did not need to be there at all. Expand
  5. Jan 23, 2013
    8
    This review contains spoilers. Hey you! Do you want to play a Japanese-style visual novel about dealing with two insane female AIs on a deserted spaceship in the far future, paging through nearly 100 different post-apocalyptic logs coming from a time when the ship's crew decided to hardcore-LARP the most brutally misogynistic period in Korean history? Of course you don't! That's why you're reading this review instead! Analogue: A Hate Story is a game about everything I just described up above. You play as a person from the distant future whose only set attribute is working for a Korean archaeological society, because this game had to firmly establish how Korean it was from the word "go", and I hope you're fine with that because the only way this game could be more Korean is if the text was in Korean (actually available as a setting), the soundtrack was done by PSY (not actually available as a setting), or if it was actually made by Koreans (it's made by Canadians). You arrive at a ship called the Mugunghwa, which, if you hadn't already guessed by now, is completely screwed and has been for a long time. You are greeted by an astonishingly human AI named Hyun-ae, who is, if you hadn't guessed by now (and you will by the time it's revealed at the end of the first hour of gameplay [by which I mean reading, not that I expected anything else, considering the genre]) actually a human personality uploaded into the computer system. It's about this time that the game introduces the OTHER AI, Mute, who is actually the ship's AI, copied by Hyun-ae and repressed for hundreds of years while the ship fell into disrepair because Hyun-ae couldn't run a spaceship to save her life. Gameplay in Analogue is told mainly through pages and pages of letters and diary entries from the time when the ship went insane. Every single reveal is exactly what you think it's going to be, which would make it sound like the game was predictable if it wasn't for the fact that it tries to make each one as gut-wrenching as possible. The TL;DR version of these logs is this: Hyun-ae was a sick girl from forever ago who was put into stasis before the ship's inhabitants decided women, medicine, and modernity were overrated, so when she woke up an indeterminate amount of time later nobody could cure her or even tell there was anything wrong with her. The rest of the logs repeatedly hammer home the point "being a woman in old Korea was the worst thing ever" until the girl turns off life support and copies herself into the computer banks. So now, you have to decide which AI you like so you can decide who to take with you when you inevitably leave the floating metal deathtrap you've strapped your tiny ship to. You communicate with the AIs entirely through binary questions because language parsing is hard and quite beyond the needed parameters of this game, to be honest. On the one hand, you have Hyun-ae, the human being who killed everyone on the station and who falls very readily in love with you if you tell her what she wants to hear, which is never hard to guess, so by all means download her and enjoy your hand as you frantically wank to her image on the screen on the trip back you sad pathetic loner. On the other hand, you have Mute, the true AI, who never dreamed of opposing the brutal regime while it was going and reads like Phyllis Schlafly in a hanbok, who is NOT romanceable (not that you'd want to), who will never ever stop complaining about Hyun-ae. I'm being too harsh with this game. I liked it, really I did, and it's beautifully written: I found myself nearly in tears at times because the game knows exactly how to horrify and sicken you with its still-very-predictable twists, but you really need to go in knowing what to expect. If you don't like visual novels, this game has absolutely no chance of changing your mind, but if you're the kind of person whose only problem with Metroid: Prime was that there weren't enough Space Pirate logs to read, then congratulations, you've got your wish, and it's wrapped in a South Korean flag. Collapse
Metascore
62

Mixed or average reviews - based on 5 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 5
  2. Negative: 1 out of 5
  1. May 14, 2012
    86
    It's no secret that I thoroughly enjoyed Analogue: A Hate Story. The writing is stellar, the music and graphics are stylish, and the interactive gameplay elements are immersive. I also appreciate its unapologetic attitude toward mass appeal, instead opting to please a very specific kind of gamer. Those who want to see a fine example of elevated video game storytelling would do best to check this game out. It may not be a long ride (5-7 hours for a single playthrough), but it is a satisfying one.
  2. Apr 6, 2012
    70
    It's a game that doesn't have the luxury of distracting you with clever mechanics and satisfying challenges to excuse its lack of narrative. It's just you and the story and how exactly you digest it. If you're interested in dystopian sci-fi and intriguing mysteries and like getting angry about patriarchal misogyny, then it's certainly something you could enjoy.
  3. Apr 5, 2012
    40
    An intriguing exercise in interactive fiction, let down by shaky writing and a major lack of emotional engagement. [Apr 2012, p.50]