Fallout: New Vegas PC

Metascore
84

Generally favorable reviews - based on 39 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 36 out of 39
  2. Negative: 0 out of 39
Buy On
  1. Apr 21, 2011
    65
    Despite Obsidian's fan-service, Fallout: New Vegas is a heaping pile of bugs.
  2. Dec 17, 2010
    65
    This game got released too early. Had it been released around the holidays, and with the collection of bugs and broken quests eliminated, I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it as a great gift for gamers. As it is, I can only say that it's beautiful but tragically flawed.
  3. Oct 25, 2010
    70
    The RPG aspect is so dominant that we forgive the technical issues and the lack of artistic ambition […] Deep but ugly, the sign of games that last.
User Score
8.6

Generally favorable reviews- based on 2896 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 49 out of 540
  1. Oct 23, 2010
    10
    27 hours in, just getting started. Take fallout 3, expand it, add more diversity, add more interesting locations, triple the amount of27 hours in, just getting started. Take fallout 3, expand it, add more diversity, add more interesting locations, triple the amount of factions, add a better theme, and add more immersion and you have fallout NV. Obsidian has taken a decent game and made it great. Really a lot more depth in the world and just overall better. Of course your on the same engine, so some of the same problems exist. But literally a new mod is released by the hour since they only have to be ported over. Im already using over 10 mods just as longer days, smaller ui, centered raised camera, perk every level etc. Oh and if you get stuttering get the d3d9 file, and if you have ati get the alternative d3d9 file so you can still use transparency mutisampling. If it wasn't for the mods i would have to take off a point or 2. Really though the best way to describe it is it makes the fallout 3 world seem boring. Full Review »
  2. Sep 18, 2015
    8
    It's an improvement over many aspects in gameplay, atmosphere and story when compared to fallout 3, but ultimately, it also retains a lot ofIt's an improvement over many aspects in gameplay, atmosphere and story when compared to fallout 3, but ultimately, it also retains a lot of the same problems from it's predecessor. Full Review »
  3. Oct 25, 2010
    9
    Obsidian realized with New Vegas what Bethesda intended with Fallout 3. Upon first inspection, New Vegas appears to be a reskin of Fallout 3Obsidian realized with New Vegas what Bethesda intended with Fallout 3. Upon first inspection, New Vegas appears to be a reskin of Fallout 3 set near the west coast. However, Obsidian brings to the table the character, design elements, and moral ambiguity of the original two Fallout games to New Vegas, overhauling the game's mechanics to fall more in line with what we traditionally associate with Fallout: You are imperfect, and you must use your personalized assets as best as you can to make it through. Whereas Fallout 3 afforded you a "Perk" every level, New Vegas cuts that down to once every two levels, and generally gives you fewer opportunities to morph your character into an all-in-one death-god. Also new to the game is the concept of "Damage Threshold" for armor, introducing a game mechanic which would require that you use heavier weapons for armored targets or face the risk of wasting rapid-fire ammo and meeting your death.

    Obsidian also included a "Hardcore" mode which seems more like the intended way of playing, rather than the optional feature that it's hyped up to be. Much like your radiation meter, in Hardcore you now have Hunger, Thirst, and Sleep meters which slowly creep up while you quest through the Mojave Wasteland, necessitating that you sleep, eat, and drink at semi-regular intervals. Crippled limbs are also much more of a hindrance in Hardcore mode, as they can only be healed by one of three routes: By paying a doctor, using a Doctor's Bag, or using "Hydra", a drug that regenerates your limbs.

    Game mechanics aside, New Vegas is to Fallout 3 what Fallout 2 was to Fallout 1. It builds and improves upon every aspect of it's predecessor, at the cost of building a game as large and intricate as a house of cards. Because there are so many different questlines, so many different ways you can do things, it's likely that at some point, you will break the game. The greatest criticism right now with New Vegas is that it has bugs. Anyone who's played Fallout since the 90s knows, however, that bugs crawling out from under the series' ambition has always plagued Fallout games. Fallout 1 and 2 have had unofficial patches from the community, fixing bugs and adding content that was originally planned; Obsidian and Bethesda are obligated to patch the game after release, as bugs are found, but if they treat this game the way they did Fallout 3 and Oblivion before it, you can expect to see a community patch in the future as well.

    However, despite release-day bugs, the game is solid, it's epic, and it will move you. I'm convinced that those who have rated this game below a 6 or 7 on the basis of "bugs" are harboring greater, older prejudices, and are looking for some justification to smear this game on the account of it not being a "true sequel" to the original two Fallout games. (ie, produced by Black Isle in the 2d isometric turn-based style)

    The soundtrack consists of sweeping ambient melodies as those found in Fallout 3, and also a brand new setlist of 50s era music, with a decidedly more "western" or "Vegas" feel (Sinatra, songs about cowboys, etc). The graphics engine is still running on a modified GameBryo engine (the same that powered Oblivion and Fallout 3) but Obsidian has manipulated the engine to great effect in order to make the world more "alive". In the opening town, Goodsprings, you'll find tumbleweeds floating around and sand twisting in the wind. As you travel from place to place, you find that atmosphere is much more diverse than Fallout 3's bleak rubble.

    The storyline is also much less contrived for you, allowing you to decide your allegiances just as you like, without feeling penned into a Good vs Evil storyline that mired Fallout 3. No single faction is purely good; Expect to make some hard choices if you want to play morally. Altogether, I'm giving this game a 9, because it'll suck you in, keep you involved, and even when you beat it, you're going to want to start one new character after another to try every route that you couldn't take in your previous playthrough. The only downsides are the bugs and the outdated graphics engine, but neither of those get noticeably in the way of the overall gameplay or storyline, which are the two big draws for this title. If the game was properly polished (which is unimaginable for QA testers considering the overall breadth and depth of the game) it would deserve a perfect 10.

    As for New Vegas, the game is as much a sequel as it is a spinoff, but I think I'm in love. Ain't that a kick in the head?
    Full Review »