User Score
7.9

Generally favorable reviews- based on 154 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 17 out of 154

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  1. Oct 25, 2012
    2
    It wasn't a very good game. The gameplay is average for an indie platformer or I suppose by now I could just say indie game since they're almost all platformers anyways. You get stuck regularly on their inane puzzles and the 'twist' to the game isn't done any better than other better games like Trine, Inversion, or even Outlands all of which feature switching the characters and/or worldIt wasn't a very good game. The gameplay is average for an indie platformer or I suppose by now I could just say indie game since they're almost all platformers anyways. You get stuck regularly on their inane puzzles and the 'twist' to the game isn't done any better than other better games like Trine, Inversion, or even Outlands all of which feature switching the characters and/or world and do so in a more interesting way. The story is near nonexistent and is nothing new just trying to save your sister or some **** like that.

    The graphics and music are both decent and well polished but they don't make up for the mediocre game. The game also felt like a very lazy console port which was disappointing. I can't recommend this game to anybody as if you're looking for a good indie platformer there are countless better games.
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  2. Feb 2, 2013
    2
    A confusing amalgam of cotton candy fairy tale visuals and "8-bit hard" gameplay. I purchased this game based on the intriguing visuals and interesting mechanic (ability switching) showcased in the trailer. I was surprised to discover that plot had been completely thrown out (magic portal sucks sisters into fantasy land...and GO!). I had expected something more from a game that seemed toA confusing amalgam of cotton candy fairy tale visuals and "8-bit hard" gameplay. I purchased this game based on the intriguing visuals and interesting mechanic (ability switching) showcased in the trailer. I was surprised to discover that plot had been completely thrown out (magic portal sucks sisters into fantasy land...and GO!). I had expected something more from a game that seemed to be trying so hard to create a stylistic visual world. At its best, it worked for the first 5 levels. The controls weren't ideal, they felt a bit 'loose'. Hit zones felt off, I had trouble determining exactly how close I could brush against enemies, this issue was compounded by the fact that each enemy has 2 forms. Then level 1-6 happens. You realize that the developers now fancy this game as a tight, die-until-you-get-it-right, ninja-fingers test of controller mastery. The only problems are the controls AREN'T tight, the visuals provide so much interference with the tasks and the completion of segments provide no satisfaction. This game has no "easy" mode. If you can't hack it, you'd better just uninstall it. Expand
  3. Nov 11, 2013
    3
    If you like pressing combinations like jump, switch dimension, jump-glide, switch dimension with exact timing this might be a game for you. I got tired after an hour.
  4. Nov 6, 2014
    1
    Giana Sisters: Twisted Dreams is a 2D platforming game whose central mechanic is the ability to switch between two versions of the same stage – a “light” version and a “twisted” version. The game is very mechanically simple, with the main character possessing the ability to move, jump, and use one of two double jumps, in addition to the primary mechanic of switching between worlds. WhileGiana Sisters: Twisted Dreams is a 2D platforming game whose central mechanic is the ability to switch between two versions of the same stage – a “light” version and a “twisted” version. The game is very mechanically simple, with the main character possessing the ability to move, jump, and use one of two double jumps, in addition to the primary mechanic of switching between worlds. While the idea sounds like it has potential, the game exhausts itself of ideas very quickly. The levels of the game are uninspired and quite long, especially given that the game encourages the player to collect every single one of the many, many hundreds of gems scattered across each level. On the whole, the game is very weak and not worth your time or money.

    The gameplay in Giana Sisters: Twisted Dreams is quite basic. Your character can run, jump, and stomp on enemies to kill them. In addition, your character has two special double jumps – one of them is a jump-twirl, which propels the character upwards an additional distance and allows them to descent at a slower, more controlled rate. The other power is the fireball – your character propels herself a longer distance than the twirl jump in a ball of flame, which can kill enemies you can headstomp on if you hit them with it, regardless of your angle of attack. Both abilities end up heavily utilized – the fireball ability for breaking through walls and bouncing from enemy to enemy, the twirl-jump for navigating several sections of the game – but neither really end up with all that much depth to them. The fireball has the seemingly-neat idea to use it to richochet around off walls, allowing the character to rapidly ascend or descend through narrow passageways, but ultimately, while this seems like a neat idea, it doesn’t really end up being all that meaningful.
    The game takes its name from the ability to “twist” the world around you, switching between the light world version and the twisted world version of the level. This doesn’t really change the level much, but it does cause some platforms to slide in and out of the wall, some hazards to become dangerous or safe, allow for the collection of differently colored gems, and some doors to open and close. The fireball switches the character to the light world by default, while the jump whirl switches the character to the twisted world; however, even in the midst of using these abilities the player can switch back between worlds. The switching is seamless and the world doesn’t change instantaneously in many cases, with platforms and gates taking a short time to slide in and out, and while this is important for a few puzzles, generally it doesn’t matter very much.
    Unfortunately, this is all that there is for the vast, vast majority of the game. In the right hands, this might have been interesting, but unfortunately, the game ends up getting pretty boring pretty quickly. The idea of switching between worlds and using the abilities is introduced across the first two stages, and in the rest of the game, only a single new mechanic is ever introduced, and its use is very intermittent.
    This could have been fine, but unfortunately, the game’s levels have almost no variation at all. There are spikes which kill the player, spikes which only kill the player in one world or the other, enemies who can be stomped on, enemies who shoot projectiles in a straight line and can be stomped on, and enemies who can’t be stomped on at all. There is another uncommon enemy type, which is an enemy which charges at the player when they are stood in front of in the light world, and which hurl ricocheting projectiles at the player in the dark world, as well as ghosts who only pursue the player in one world or the other and who are otherwise invincible (but can be stopped by beams of light, which kill them but primarily serve as a means of preventing the ghosts from pursuing the player into other parts of the level rather than as a means of actually defeating them organically).
    These limited enemy types are hurt by the level design, which doesn’t really introduce many new mechanics at all; there are platforms which rise, fall, or simply fall apart after the player stands on them, and there are arrows which, if the player strikes them with the fireball, launches the player in the direction of the arrow. The levels themselves are not designed in any sort of coherent or aesthetically pleasing manner, with the player making their way through the twisted path of the level, trying to get to the end while just overcoming arbitrary-feeling platforming challenges. I never got any sense of a higher intelligence behind the level designs, and very few of them included anything clever in them at all.

    Overall, the game fails to do anything interesting, and ends up becoming boring and repetitive quite quickly. There’s nothing here that hasn’t been done much better in other 2D platformers, and even the game’s presentation isn’t very strong. Not worth your time or money.
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Metascore
77

Generally favorable reviews - based on 21 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 15 out of 21
  2. Negative: 1 out of 21
  1. May 7, 2013
    75
    Twisted Dreams is as old school as it gets. It’s also long and offers some additional modes for really hardcore gamers who should like Black Forest’s platformer. [CD-Action 05/2013, p.73]
  2. Feb 1, 2013
    63
    Giana Sisters: Twisted Dreams may provide a few hours of polished puzzle-platforming, but don't be surprised if you ultimately end up estranged.[March 2013, p.65]
  3. Jan 19, 2013
    40
    Fans of the Giana Sisters likely Kickstarted this game, thus earning a copy of it in the process. However, for those who don't already own a copy, there's no way that I can recommend it without it weighing on my conscience. Giana Sisters: Twisted Dreams is simply not worth the time.