Homeworld PC

User Score
8.9

Generally favorable reviews- based on 332 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 18 out of 332
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  1. Mar 13, 2015
    6
    I like this game ,,, the story were OK , the game-play was good ,,, solid mechanics overall but not revolutionary in any way ,,, i played the remastered version and was a pleasant experience
  2. Griper
    Jan 8, 2008
    6
    Finally, comes a game that does what should have been done ages ago... removes the "bulking up" for attack and allows tactical stike forces. But quickly gets overcomplicated and hard to control... it's not like it's a bad game, but learning all that I can learn to play the game isn't that much fun. And the control system feels... tacked on... as if you were never ment to Finally, comes a game that does what should have been done ages ago... removes the "bulking up" for attack and allows tactical stike forces. But quickly gets overcomplicated and hard to control... it's not like it's a bad game, but learning all that I can learn to play the game isn't that much fun. And the control system feels... tacked on... as if you were never ment to play, but only to watch. Expand
  3. Apr 15, 2012
    9
    this is one of the most definitive RTS games in gaming history. Wanna know why? keep reading.
    PLOT, SCRIPT, NARATIVE AND WRITING: On the dessert planet of Kharak due to a satellite malfunction the people who live there discover an ancient startship in a dessert along with a hyperspace engine and a stone with coordinates with to what appears to be their planet of origin, called Hiigara
    this is one of the most definitive RTS games in gaming history. Wanna know why? keep reading.
    PLOT, SCRIPT, NARATIVE AND WRITING: On the dessert planet of Kharak due to a satellite malfunction the people who live there discover an ancient startship in a dessert along with a hyperspace engine and a stone with coordinates with to what appears to be their planet of origin, called Hiigara curved on it. The Kharakian clans put aside their differences and collaborated to build a huge mothership that would take them to Hiigara. A neuroscientist named karan developed a system that connected a human being with the mothership as its living computer. Karan volunteered and became the ships living computer and commander. First trials are about to begin, and this is where the game begins and where my spoiling ends. The writing of the game has a poetic direction. The narrator, the characters all feel like they are coming from inside a poem of sorts. This whole direction of narrative is very original and effective in contributing to the game's atmosphere. The voice acting seemed dull at the beginning, but this changed fast. It has a subtle emotional tension that works really well.
    GAMEPLAY AND MECHANICS: The mothership is your primary base of opperations. There you can build all sorts of ships, from the smallest scout to the biggest battlecruiser, but it cannot move and while it is very durable it can't dish out any real punishment. There is also the carrier, a unit that has more limited building capabilities and the research ships that are used to acquire new units and tech and which you can only have six at any given moment. And now lets see the part of the game that really made it stand out. Its unique, for an RTS, 3D space navigation. Now there is an extra dimension to navigate. This opens up new possibilities in tactics. Send ships, not just around, but also above and under your enemy, a function that i believe was greatly appreciated by those who liked multiplayer. This mechanic is implemented excellently in HW and really works, but it has some minor quirks. You see, to move your unit you can't just right or left click somewhere in the map. You must either select the appropriate option from a menu opened by right clicking the unit or units whom you wish to move and then left clicking on the map, and you must keep pressing shift in order to choose directional height. Fear not though. The tutorial does an excellent job on teaching you the ropes and the movement system is relatively easy to get used to.
    There is also a world map mode accessed by pressing spacebar. From there you got an over all view of the entire map so you can monitor various fronts, you can see where resources are denser and you units appear as green dots(enemy as red while colour varies in multiplayer). One of the best features of the game is the fact that whatever you have(units, resources etc.) carries on to the next mission. You must be effective in the missions ahead as it would be unpleasant if you have ended up on the next mission with very low resources and with a very small ineffective wing of interceptors vs a full enemy fleet. Missions themselves are very unpredictable in nature, and I wont say more about this element so I dont spoil them. Lastly many missions will make you fill like you fighting against all odds, and you do. Enemy forces will often outnumber your's quite a bit and you will be like â
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Metascore
93

Universal acclaim - based on 20 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 20 out of 20
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 20
  3. Negative: 0 out of 20
  1. Simply one of those titles that makes you say "Wow." You'll have to pick your jaw up off the floor when you experience it for the first time. It is a rare gem; an awesome feat of programming, graphical design, and sound production, all wrapped around superb gameplay. It deserves the highest praise.
  2. With its stunning 3D engine, uniquely challenging gameplay in both single- and multiplayer modes, great audio, and terrific story, Homeworld is both an excellent game and one that may well reshape the entire real-time strategy genre.
  3. Not only has control of this environment been handled well, but the smoothness of overall presentation and gameplay seem to reflect an excellence from RTS titles that we should all be looking forward to in the future.