Salvo! Image
Metascore
58

Mixed or average reviews - based on 5 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: Travel back in time to an era when battles for the supremacy of the sea lanes was decided by brave men commanding massive fortresses of floating wood and cloth. No radar lock- ons, just the Mark I eyeball, and no guided missiles, just heavy orbs of iron. Battle would be joined so closeTravel back in time to an era when battles for the supremacy of the sea lanes was decided by brave men commanding massive fortresses of floating wood and cloth. No radar lock- ons, just the Mark I eyeball, and no guided missiles, just heavy orbs of iron. Battle would be joined so close together that you could practically see what your enemy had for lunch by spotting the stains on his uniform. This was an era of steel nerves and sound tactics, of sea knowledge and possessing a little bit of Poseidon's own luck. Spruegames' Salvo! recreates this era. [Shrapnel Games] Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 0 out of 5
  2. Negative: 1 out of 5
  1. Salvo! is fun, but I just didn’t become hooked. I can see this appealing a lot more to those interested in historical naval combat, but for me it just wasn’t enough to keep my attention for more than a handful of hours.
  2. This is a niche game and one for those who are a huge fan of this type of game.
  3. 65
    There aren't too many games that simulate this type of combat, so you pretty much have to take what you can get. Still, for forty bucks I expected a few more bells and whistles.
  4. Turn based strategy fans have to be really desperate to seek out Salvo. It's not a terrible game by any stretch but it's just too slow and ponderous to shake me out of the doldrums. I know a game is in trouble when all I do is think about things that would make it better.
  5. A fair game that is almost completely undone by an interface as archaic as the warfare it presents. [Nov 2005, p.79]