Sid Meier's Civilization V: Gods & Kings Image
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80

Generally favorable reviews - based on 53 Critics What's this?

User Score
7.6

Generally favorable reviews- based on 435 Ratings

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  • Summary: Sid Meier's Civilization V: God & Kings takes players through time as they engage in new quests and global competitions, interact with new types of city-states, and master exciting new systems for land and naval combat. Nine new civilizations; nine new wonders; three original scenarios;Sid Meier's Civilization V: God & Kings takes players through time as they engage in new quests and global competitions, interact with new types of city-states, and master exciting new systems for land and naval combat. Nine new civilizations; nine new wonders; three original scenarios; and dozens of new units, buildings, technologies and resources have also been added, offering even more ways for players to expand their empire on their quest to rule the world. Expand
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 42 out of 53
  2. Negative: 1 out of 53
  1. PC PowerPlay
    Jul 31, 2012
    100
    The rarest of all expansions: the one that's better than its base game. [Aug 2012, p.58]
  2. Jun 18, 2012
    90
    Gods & Kings feels like what Civilization V wanted to be all along. It doesn't so much "expand" the game as evolve it. Strategic combat finally feels strategic, and the diplomatic game, enhanced by religion, espionage and a few new tweaks, finally matters.
  3. Jun 22, 2012
    90
    Civilization V: Gods and Kings is an eminently worthwhile collection of big and small changes that enhance an already amazing game.
  4. Jul 12, 2012
    81
    A grab bag of game systems to bring new life to Civ V. Definitely worthwhile, and almost certainly holier than thou. [Sept 2012, p.76]
  5. 80
    Gods & Kings does not make Civilization V a new game, but a better one. You canĀ“t ask more out of an add-on.
  6. Jun 18, 2012
    80
    To put it succinctly: it is more Civilization V to add to your copy of Civilization V. If you still have even a flicker of a desire to play more Civilzation V, that news should be all you need to justify picking up Gods & Kings.
  7. Jun 18, 2012
    40
    This is the same disappointing strategy game it was a year and a half ago, except that it now has two finicky and mostly unimpressive systems shoehorned in.

See all 53 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 33 out of 61
  2. Negative: 8 out of 61
  1. Nov 24, 2012
    10
    Gods and Kings is a true expansion pack, not a minor DLC as we keep having from other games.
    The expansion really adds to the game, giving
    Gods and Kings is a true expansion pack, not a minor DLC as we keep having from other games.
    The expansion really adds to the game, giving you a bunch of new features to play with, and it makes the strategy-setting more complex and, in result, better. The features include not only the religion, but also new civilizations, units, wonders, the expanded diplomacy... It really improves the game!
    In regard to the price, I think that 24 dollars may be a little too much for an expansion, as you can buy a lot of full games for that price, so I'd wait for some sale (like Black Friday) to get it with a good discount.
    But it is definitely worth it.
    Expand
  2. Jul 10, 2012
    9
    My love for the Civilization series started as a kid playing the first Civilization on my Amiga. I've seen features appear and disappearMy love for the Civilization series started as a kid playing the first Civilization on my Amiga. I've seen features appear and disappear trough the various installments, but never did so many features go missing as it did between the forth and fifth game. Therefore I was excited when this expansion was announced, as it was bringing back espionage and religion, two things that had in fact been introduced in an expansion to Civilization 4. The question; Is it worth buying something that maybe should have been included from the start? In short, YES! This expansion adds another layer of strategy to the game, and also fixes some of the imbalances in the tech tree and dominant strategies. Also worth mentioning is the 9 interesting new nations that are focused on either city states or the new religion mechanic "faith". There are also a bunch of new units that "plugs" the gap between the late 19th century and the start of the 20th century. All in all, a great expansion to an already great game! Expand
  3. DrZ
    Jun 22, 2012
    9
    My history with Civ: I have played all Civ series and Alpha centauri.

    After first playing Civ V I thought it wasn't good enough of a series
    My history with Civ: I have played all Civ series and Alpha centauri.

    After first playing Civ V I thought it wasn't good enough of a series for the masterpiece Civ IV was. There were a lot of bugs, balance issues and a wierd diplomacy system. But after spending some time to understand it I begun to think that it has more tactical value than IV because of the combat system. It reminds me of Panzer general in some way. The expansion addresses a whole lot of issues that the Vanilla had: - great improvement in the AI (it will no longer just walk into the range of my units, also combines his units in a good manner) - Diplomacy far more intelligible - RA spam is no more - Open border selling span is gone because now you need an embassy and it comes later into the tech tree - Religion is far less passive than in IV and has a lot more diversity - City states are no more easily bought with money but you really need to do quests now.

    Over all i think the developers really tried to balance it and listened to the community. I hope more people will try it out
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  4. Mar 7, 2013
    8
    It's still that same great Civ V, but improved. Expansion brings religion, spies, new units, wonders, civilizations scenarios. All newIt's still that same great Civ V, but improved. Expansion brings religion, spies, new units, wonders, civilizations scenarios. All new content make this game better Expand
  5. Jun 19, 2012
    7
    Gods & Kings does a lot right, but stumbles a bit when it comes to the ostensible focus of the expansion - religion and espionage. Let's startGods & Kings does a lot right, but stumbles a bit when it comes to the ostensible focus of the expansion - religion and espionage. Let's start with the good. You get a lot more bang for your buck with this expansion rather than the previous model of 'sell a civ for $5'. There are several decent civilizations added, expanding your options for play, new luxury resources to take advantage of, and 2 new city state types along with more in-depth interaction. Various other gameplay changes such as a slightly retooled combat system, new buildings/units/wonders, and an overhaul of certain key aspects will probably require you to change your strategies a bit. The scenarios included are interesting and detailed, particularly the steampunk themed one. Now for the bad. Religion is a bit more hands off than I'd like - most of the game is spent waiting around for your 'faith resource' to accrue, then choosing perks from a list. If religion sounds suspiciously like another culture bar, that's because it essentially is. After you have enough 'faith resource', you wait for a great prophet to be generated. Once he is, you found your religion (naming it 'Pastafarianism' or 'Atheism' is only funny once, trust me) and choose some unique traits. The 'build-a-religion' thing is a pretty cool idea, but when certain traits give +10% wonder building, and others give +1 food from camps, you can be pretty sure where everyone playing to win is going to head. From there you can go on and spread it to neighboring cities, but unfortunately, religion starts to die off in importance in later eras of the game and slowly becomes replaced with Espionage. I understand the Real World reasoning behind it, but instead of two full gameplay functions, it feels like I'm only getting 2 halves. Espionage is done completely within the menu interface. I found it to be sort of interesting, but again, very hands off, as once you move your spy to a city, they do things automatically with no further input. All in all, Gods & Kings is a decent expansion, but it's mainly due to the other stuff that's bundled with with it rather than the key features. Hopefully future dev tweaking and balancing will make religion and espionage more interesting than they are currently, as well as fix the numerous bugs that shipped with the last couple of patches. If you enjoyed Civ 5 as-is, you will probably like this expansion quite a bit. On the other hand, if you were disappointed in Civ 5 due to gameplay , strategic depth or another similar reason, Gods & Kings unfortunately doesn't really do anything to resolve the underlying issues. Expand
  6. Dec 22, 2012
    6
    The game lacked soul on release and even now continues to lack soul with the upgrade to Gods and Kings. You will expend a great deal of timeThe game lacked soul on release and even now continues to lack soul with the upgrade to Gods and Kings. You will expend a great deal of time on this game. You will enjoy it. Its just not as good as Civ 4. Expand
  7. Feb 17, 2013
    0
    less than useless. Although my PC is clearly within the crosshairs of this game, it constantly hangs. It always says "Next Turn", butless than useless. Although my PC is clearly within the crosshairs of this game, it constantly hangs. It always says "Next Turn", but nothing happens. The little workers work, but the game does not progress. I have to get to the Task Manager to close the game and Steam. Really not worth the effort for 5 minutes of play. Throwing it out. Will never buy from Steam or Sid again. Expand

See all 61 User Reviews